Results 41–60 of 228 for speaker:Hon. Harold Nicolson

European Situation. (3 Apr 1939)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: In following the hon. Member for North Battersea (Mr. Sanders), I wish merely to add my pebble to that great bastion of support which the Prime Minister must feel that he has now behind him. I think it is only fair and fitting that those of us who criticised the Munich Agreement should admit that at one point at least we made a miscalculation. We grossly underestimated the effect which the...

European Situation. (3 Apr 1939)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I do not know the exact proportion of the Communist and Socialist parties in Germany compared to the 80,000,000 population, but I am certain that they are all against it. I do not wish to enter into that argument, because I would be delighted to agree with the hon. Gentleman in any proportions he could give me. I am trying to diminish the optimism of those who imagine that the present system...

European Situation. (3 Apr 1939)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I doubt whether it is 40 per cent. to-day. To continue my argument, I was saying that it is important that we should not under-estimate the fear aroused in the German public by the conception of encirclement. We here know perfectly well that the Prime Minister is quite incapable or unwilling to encircle anything. We think it ridiculous to pretend that our Government at any moment wishes to...

Orders of the Day — Class Vii.: International Situation. (31 Jul 1939)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I was quite aware of what the hon. Baronet said. I suggested that what he said was a misstatement, due to want of special study of the subject of which he is speaking. As a matter of fact, the speeches to which he referred have not been used as propaganda. What has been used is old dug-out propaganda material from the period of the last War. If it comes to a question of propaganda the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Film Studios. (13 Sep 1939)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Is the right hon. Gentleman aware of the great use which is being made in Germany and other countries of the film as an instrument of propaganda?

Oral Answers to Questions — Aliens.: British Council for Christian Settlement in Europe. (19 Oct 1939)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: asked the Home Secretary whether he is aware that several persons prominently connected with the Link, which was disbanded as an agency of enemy propaganda, have now joined a new organisation, styling itself "The British Council for Christian Settlement in Europe"; and whether the activities of these people are still being watched?

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It is an outside organisation.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Yes, Sir, under the supervision of the head of the Mission.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: No, it is through the Foreign Office to the head of the Mission. Reports come to us, and there is a sort of dual liaison.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I am sure my right hon. Friend would agree with the hon. Member for Romford (Mr. Parker) that this Debate has served a useful purpose. We are very grateful to hon. Members not only for the brevity of their speeches, which has enabled the Committee to get through such variety of discussion in so short a time, but for the many suggestions on many topics that have been made to us, and the...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: They are increasing all the time. I cannot give the exact number now, but I will let the hon. Member know. Not only in times of danger should there be somebody to guide local opinion, but in the event of any dislocation of information taking place, such as a momentary stoppage of the wireless, there should be recognised people in every street, if possible, whose information is taken as...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: They get it from the regional office. All regional offices have their central office where the news is received and they have branch offices where it is disseminated. My hon. Friend the Member for Norwich (Mr. H. Strauss) launched an attack—I do not think a deserved attack—upon the British Broadcasting Corporation and especially upon their choice of Mr. Middleton Murry, I would not have...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: In any case I do not admit the principle that you must refuse to use the services of a person because that person has in the past been completely opposed to war.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: He gave six talks and I cannot pretend to have listened to more than one or two of them but he is an extremely cultured critic with a very sensitive mind and great knowledge and is very competent to deal with any literary or critical subject. A great deal has been said in this Debate about the proportions between entertainment and talks in the B.B.C. programme, and the Minister's...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It is a great question whether Germans should be used for this purpose or not. As the hon. Gentleman knows, there has always been great controversy about whether it causes more annoyance than pleasure in these cases to hear Germans speaking on the wireless. My personal opinion is that you should always use a purely sectional German representing a definite class or interest and that it is a...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: There certainly is a distinction. The hon. Lady the Member for the English Universities (Miss Rathbone) was the first to touch upon the question of what I may call Anglo-French propaganda, and she drew a rather gloomy picture of the doubts that were being expressed in France about our war effort. I went to France about two months ago and lectured in about 12 different places. The people whom...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Yes, that is what we are doing at this moment. It is all very difficult, but what we have been trying to arrangements been, not to hear from French people over here about France's war effort or to send English people to France to talk to the French people about this country's war effort, but to get English speakers to tell our country about the French war effort and French speakers to tell...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Well, what am I to do? Would it be more effective if I tried to talk as the Minister of Labour does, than if the Minister of Labour tried to talk as I do? It is a question of how one talks. If it is intensely irritating for the hon. Member for Burslem to listen to me, he has only to do one little thing—that is, to turn off. I am certainly not going to adopt a sham attitude on the wireless...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Yes, Sir. That is realised. The second question that the hon. Member for East Wolverhampton asked was about a panel of speakers. We are getting a great many non-political, or non-House of Commons people, such as Professor Jones and that type.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Perhaps the hon. Member will let me know what he has in mind. He spoke a great deal of propaganda in the Balkans, and I can tell him that this is also being organised. The suggestion is being made, and, in fact, is urgently being considered, to send out a sort of supervisor, a man of experience and position, to supervise the whole question of public relations with the Balkans. He will have a...


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