Results 1–20 of 593 for speaker:Mr George Spencer

Orders of the Day — Agricultural Rates Bill. (19 Apr 1929)

Mr George Spencer: I wish to support the action of the Government in the interests of the farmers of the country. I have just been helping an Independent candidate at Boston who is the owner or part-owner of 8,000 acres of land. Anything that is given by this Bill will go to that man himself as farmer. Last year, he lost £40,000, although his land is some of the best to be found in the country. If a man in...

Orders of the Day — Agricultural Rates Bill. (19 Apr 1929)

Mr George Spencer: I am about to finish. I believe that we are on the right lines in relieving the farmer of some of the burden that is on him. I hope not only that this Bill will pass, but that something further will be done.

Orders of the Day — Agricultural Rates Bill. (19 Apr 1929)

Mr George Spencer: Does my hon. Friend know that the wages of agricultural labourers have been raised in many instances by 100 per cent., but that wages are in danger of being reduced unless something is done for the farmers?

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Debate on the Address. (7 Nov 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Anyone who knows British trade and industry will have to regret that such a deplorable state of affairs exists, not only in the coal trade, which is exceedingly bad, but in almost the whole of the basic industries of the country. There may be particular causes of which I know nothing at all, but, in my opinion, there are two main causes which have contributed more than any other to the sorry...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Debate on the Address. (7 Nov 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Professor Sidgwick. What has been the main argument and the whole basis of Free Trade, starting with Adam Smith and built up a. little bit by John Stuart Mill? It has been this, that you have at the extremes of our country great barriers over which capital cannot go and cannot leave the country, and this capital, they say, will be employed in the country and, as it is employed in the country,...

Orders of the Day — Workmen's Compensation Bill. (4 May 1928)

Mr George Spencer: There must be something genuine in the position because the accidents themselves have increased, which is the remarkable thing. Anything that would reduce the number of accidents would be of great service to the industry.

Orders of the Day — Workmen's Compensation Bill. (4 May 1928)

Mr George Spencer: There is in the insurance companies, at any rate.

Orders of the Day — Workmen's Compensation Bill. (4 May 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Many things have happened which make it very desirable indeed that the Workmen's Compensation Law should be amended. Not the least of these has been the very serious change in the cost of living. The recommendations made, apart altogether from the cost of living, by the Holman Gregory Report, suggest a figure of 66⅔ per cent. for what is now only 50 per cent. I have never been capable of...

Orders of the Day — Workmen's Compensation Bill. (4 May 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Because it is an act which the man has done thousands of times, and may do thousands of times more, without any accident arising from it. If it is laid down that a man must not violate any law or Regulation, especially in the case of the coal-mining industry, you will add 50 per cent. to the cost to-morrow. It is a well-known fact that it is an impossibility to work the mines economically...

Orders of the Day — Workmen's Compensation Bill. (4 May 1928)

Mr George Spencer: I must not assume laurels which are not mine. I think it was the hon. Member for the Hartlepools who made that statement.

Orders of the Day — Empire Trade and Development. (10 Apr 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Does the hon. Member really mean that the value of the total exports of butter from all parts of the Empire in 1913, including Australian butter, was only £382,000? I think he must be wrong.

Orders of the Day — Empire Trade and Development. (10 Apr 1928)

Mr George Spencer: I hardly think I should have intervened had it not been that the hon. Member for Abertillery (Mr. Barker) said that the Empire was more of a sham than a reality. Whatever may be the opinion of the Labour Benches, that is not the opinion of my Friends around me. I also, like my hon. Friend, have had the privilege of travelling in the Empire; in fact, I emigrated in the early days of my youth.

Orders of the Day — Empire Trade and Development. (10 Apr 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Yes, I came back. I have always regretted that when I had got married, I did not go out again, because the delight of life in those parts of the Empire is much greater than in England, mainly owing to the climate. I should like to take up a point made by the hon. Member for Dumfries (Dr. Chapple) as to the paternal Government in New Zealand. The Government in New Zealand undoubtedly does...

Orders of the Day — Empire Trade and Development. (10 Apr 1928)

Mr George Spencer: Subsequently to 1896 the condition of the working classes has not been improving. It would not be in Order to discuss that at length, but since 1896—it may be a coincidence, or something to do with it—we have had a great extension of the sloppy, semi-Socialistic measures so advocated from the Labour Benches. [HON. MEMBERS: "Free trade."] Yes, we have had free trade. It would take too long...

Orders of the Day — Empire Trade and Development. (10 Apr 1928)

Mr George Spencer: No. Under the most virile, individualistic system of farming. If my hon. Friend will allow me to say this, it is that the Denmark farmer keeps all he makes. That is not Socialism, if I know anything about Socialism. The Denmark farmer is the occupying owner, with the full ownership of the means of production, distribution and exchange. That is not Socialism, if I know anything about...

Orders of the Day — Government and Coal Industry. (7 Dec 1927)

Mr George Spencer: This problem presents itself from two points of view, one, the human aspect, and the other, the economic. As regards the human side of the question, I should like to say that I think it ought now to be treated as a special problem, and that the Government should render every assistance possible for the purpose of conveying men from one locality to another. I know perfectly well that this is...

Orders of the Day — Government and Coal Industry. (7 Dec 1927)

Mr George Spencer: I give the hon. Member a present of all that. Whatever the past has been, let us recognise what the fact is now. Everybody will recognise the fact, and whoever will come down to-the real truth has to admit that the losses are serious, taking them right throughout the coalfields. Are not these figures correct? They are not mine, but the figures of Mr. Cook, and were circulated by him. He says...

Orders of the Day — Government and Coal Industry. (7 Dec 1927)

Mr George Spencer: I am interested in bringing back the industry to a standard of prosperity. Surely if we have got an agreement, apart from its local character, to the principles of which we have previously given willing consent how can we complain? Everybody knows that if there is higher prosperity and if the coalowners get a higher return on their investments that prosperity will be reflected in higher wages...

Orders of the Day — Government and Coal Industry. (7 Dec 1927)

Mr George Spencer: I was at that time one of the miners, and I am to-day, and I have done just as much service to the miners as any man who tries to cry me down. These are the words in a report of a deputation of owners and miners to the Prime Minister, and they stand as an everlasting charge against our own incompetency and inability to seize a. golden opportunity that was presented to us. There attended the...

Orders of the Day — Government and Coal Industry. (7 Dec 1927)

Mr George Spencer: I am going to deal with that point in a moment, and I am going to show that, from the trade union point of view, and from the very expres- sions of the Labour party itself, it is necessary that we ought to do something more than talk in the House of Commons if we are going to rehabilitate the trade of this country. Let me, however, go on to deal with the imports of iron and steel. The figures...


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