Results 61–80 of 458 for speaker:Mr David Mason

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: What I said was that sterling prices had not risen, but that if we had been on the gold standard we should have had much lower prices. That was my point. If we had been on gold, we should have increased the purchasing power of wages. It is true that sterling prices have not risen, but we have not had the advantages which would have accrued if we had been on a gold standard.

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: The hon. Gentleman does my right hon. Friend an injustice. Surely he recognises that there is a moral responsibility involved in this matter.

New Clause. — (Provisions as to the custody of public moneys.) (11 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: I agree with a good deal of what the hon. Member for South Croydon (Mr. H. Williams) has said. I should like to ask the Minister whether there is any provision for an official audit.

New Clause. — (Provisions as to the custody of public moneys.) (11 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: That will involve an official audit?

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill.: Clause 238. — (Compensation for loss of rights.) (5 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: I should like to support what my hon. Friend the Member for Kidderminster (Sir J. Wardlaw-Milne) has just said, while sympathising with my hon. Friends opposite with regard to the hardship which might be caused by the fall of the rupee. I would point out, however, that the Bill distinctly says in Clause 238: If by reason of anything done under this Part of this Act the conditions of service...

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill.: Clause 2–35. — (Reserved posts.) (4 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: In the last Subsection it states that 28 days is the period during which these rules must remain laid before this House. We know that that is too short a time even in the ordinary course of events in matters dealing with this country. There are many questions here under paragraphs (a)and(b)which involve the Governor-General, and which would take a considerable amount of time. I quite agree...

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill.: Clause 177. — (Directions and principles to be observed by Railway Authority.) (1 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: I think the Mover and Seconder of the Amendment are unnecessarily alarmed that trade will not come to this country from India. It is bound to come here, because we promote the finance of those railways on account of the Indian loans which are placed in this country. All Indian loans placed here must go to India either in goods or in service, and hon. Members are, as I say, unnecessarily...

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill.: Clause 177. — (Directions and principles to be observed by Railway Authority.) (1 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: Goods or services. Would the hon. Member explain how it is liquidated?

Oral Answers to Questions — Monetary Policy. (28 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: 35. asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether, in view of the distress and depression of trade, both internally and externally, affecting adversely our foreign trade which is taking place in the gold bloc countries, and which has been accentuated by the fall in the value of the paper pound, His Majesty's Government will now take steps to advance the establishment of a common monetary standard?

Oral Answers to Questions — Monetary Policy. (28 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: Can the right hon. Gentleman say when he will be in a position to give some information, and how much distress and depression of trade are necessary before he takes action?

Unemployment (Dependants' Benefit). (28 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: Cannot the Minister responsible give an undertaking that he will make an inquiry?

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Army Estimates, 1935. (18 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: It was a collective force.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Army Estimates, 1935. (18 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: We have not gibed. The right hon. Gentleman gibed at the Labour Opposition. I am simply pointing out that it was a collective force on the Saar.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates and Estimates for Revknue Departments, 1935 (Vote on Account). (7 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: It is my experience generally of cartels and monopolies that they are as a rule devised for the benefit of producers and that they penalise the consumers. I rose to introduce a somewhat different subject, though one connected with the earlier part of the Debate, namely, the scandals which have been unearthed in the City of London. There is one thing that we find, those of us who have studied...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates and Estimates for Revknue Departments, 1935 (Vote on Account). (7 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: I tried to be perfectly fair, I gave the actual figures. I gave the figures when we went off the gold standard in 1931 and the figures for last year. The increase amounts to £41,000,000.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates and Estimates for Revknue Departments, 1935 (Vote on Account). (7 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: I said that Paris is amazed that we in this country do not seem to appreciate the gravity of the situation.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates and Estimates for Revknue Departments, 1935 (Vote on Account). (7 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: The point I made was that sterling prices, as a result of inflation, have not fallen to the same extent as gold prices.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates and Estimates for Revknue Departments, 1935 (Vote on Account). (7 Mar 1935)

Mr David Mason: The fall in exchange value has not affected to any great extent the internal value of the pound, but it has had an effect upon its external purchasing power.


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