Results 41–60 of 458 for speaker:Mr David Mason

Oral Answers to Questions — Taxation (International Comparison). (16 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: 34. asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he can inform the House of the taxation per head in the United Kingdom for 1913–44 and that for 1933–34, also the corresponding figures for France, Germany, Italy, and the United States of America?

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill.: Seventh Schedule. — (Legislative Lists.) (14 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: I would ask the Government whether it is not possible for them to give some assurance that if they retain this provision in the Bill they will also provide for agricultural banks or facilities of that sort. I agree with the hon. and gallant Member for Bournemouth (Sir H. Croft) that this money-lending is a scourge in India. But it is also a necessary evil. What are the Government going to do...

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill.: Seventh Schedule. — (Legislative Lists.) (14 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: I did not suggest that the British Government could do it, but I only asked the Government to—

Oral Answers to Questions — Comparative Taxation. (9 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: 23. asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he can inform the House of the taxation per head in the United Kingdom for 1913–14 and that for 1933–34, also the corresponding figures for France, Germany, Italy, and the United States of America?

Oral Answers to Questions — Comparative Taxation. (9 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: Will the right hon. Gentleman allow me to apologise for the short notice of this question? I wished to get the figures, if possible, before the discussion of the Finance Bill.

Oral Answers to Questions — Subsidies. (9 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: 24. asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer the total amount of money which was voted by the House of Commons by way of subsidy during the past financial year?

Oral Answers to Questions — Subsidies. (9 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: Having regard to the significance of that reply, will the right hon. Gentleman bear in mind the advisability of reducing these subsidies in the coming years so as to relieve general taxation?

Oral Answers to Questions — Germany.: Loans (Interest). (7 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: Is the right hon. Gentleman not satisfied that to proceed by way of a clearing-house in regard to these debts would be most inadvisable?

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment as to Relief in Respect Oflife Insurance Premiums. (1 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: I entirely support the Motion submitted by the hon. Gentleman. The Financial Secretary to the Treasury comes down here and makes apologies for his colleague of the Board of Trade not being present. We should have been delighted to see him, but we hear that he is engaged at a Chamber of Commerce function. After all, the House of Commons takes predecence over a Chamber of Commerce. But that is...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment as to Relief in Respect Oflife Insurance Premiums. (1 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: I am sorry if I have transgressed, but my object in supporting the Motion was to point out the inability of the representative of the Treasury to explain the Resolution. Incidentally, the Resolution does mention that it is proposed in the public interest, and I think that is a very good reason for supporting the Motion to adjourn the Debate. If we are asked to pass a Resolution authorising...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment as to Relief in Respect Oflife Insurance Premiums. (1 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: In the circumstances, I will content myself with saying that I entirely support the Motion, and I hope that many others in the House, whatever their views may be in regard to the tax, will also support it on the general principle and in the interests of the dignity and responsibility of the House of Commons. Many of us must feel most indignant that we should be asked to come here and be...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment as to Relief in Respect Oflife Insurance Premiums. (1 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: I also desire to support the Chancellor of the Exchequer in his refusal to accept the proposal. It is very true that any large increase in indirect taxation presses hardest on the poor. There is no question about the figures, I gave them during the Budget Debate, and they show that the average of Income Tax and Surtax had declined whereas there has been a large increase in Customs and other...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment as to Relief in Respect Oflife Insurance Premiums. (1 May 1935)

Mr David Mason: I am hoping for the day when we shall be able to reduce Income Tax to a reasonable figure.

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: With a great deal of what the hon. Member for Lime-house (Mr. Attlee) has said, I am in full agreement. I agree that when the right hon. Gentleman does indulge in a raid, he does it in a respectable manner. I should like to offer my congratulations along with others to the Chancellor of the Exchequer for his lucid exposition. Whether we agree with him or not, I am sure that his unfailing...

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: That may be. It is estimated that about £80,000,000 is a fair sum saved per annum on the National Debt.

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: Thank you for correcting my statement, but there has been a saving in the interest charge of no less than £96,600,000, or last year something like £80,000,000. I would ask how this large sum is being used? Of course, various items contribute to this revenue, but I think it will be admitted that the saving by the conversion of National Debt is far and away the largest item which has enabled...

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: I will come to that matter. It is not the essential test. If you wish to test whether your currency is inflated or depreciated, you adopt this simple method. It is not my method, and it is well known to authorities on finance. Adam Smith used it more than a hundred years ago. The Mint price is 85s. for an ounce of fine gold, and you compare that figure with the market price which to-day is...

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: It is rather difficult to deal with a wide reference of that character. I only ask the hon. Member to do me the honour to read the OFFICIAL REPORT to-morrow. I have tried very hard to be clear and lucid. The hon. Gentleman is right, for it is a question which refers to our bread and butter. It is essential that we should try to base this matter on sound finance in order to help the...

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: No. I do not suggest that for a moment, but the purchase and sale of gold is I believe very considerable. However, we are at a loss to know what actually happens because we do not get an account.

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (17 Apr 1935)

Mr David Mason: That is true, but it is impossible to say. I assume, however, from the imports and exports of gold that there is a large holding in gold both in the Bank of England and in the Exchange Equalisation Account. If stabilisation takes place we shall know where we are, and if there be a deficit we should have to write it off as a loss. To assume, as the right hon. Gentleman assumed so complacently,...


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