Results 281–300 of 458 for speaker:Mr David Mason

Wholesale Prices. (8 Mar 1933)

Mr David Mason: It has not benefited industry.

Orders of the Day — Civil Estimates, Supplementary Estimate, 1932.: Dominion Services. (7 Mar 1933)

Mr David Mason: I agree that we must be careful in lending money to anyone, but it is not right to call this a guarantee. It is a Grant-in-aid, and I think it is right and proper. This is a, time when we are suffering in all parts of the world, and if we are able, by nursing certain debtors who are in distress, to save what we have already lent, that is surely the part of wisdom rather than of recklessness....

Orders of the Day — Civil Estimates, Supplementary Estimate, 1932.: Dominion Services. (7 Mar 1933)

Mr David Mason: No, but to help Newfoundland to maintain its credit. If other people have already lent considerable sums to Newfoundland and other parts of the British Dominions, is it not wise finance to nurse these people, who in the present depression need to be brought back to solvency? Does not that benefit every class, whether the capitalist or the working class? If we suffer great losses all over the...

Orders of the Day — Civil Estimates, Supplementary Estimate, 1932.: Dominion Services. (7 Mar 1933)

Mr David Mason: We are discussing Newfoundland at the moment. I hope my right hon. Friend will bear that in mind. I wish him well and hope the money will be well spent.

Orders of the Day — Supply. (27 Feb 1933)

Mr David Mason: I agree with the hon. and learned Member for Nelson and Colne (Mr. Thorp) that the announcement of the Foreign Secretary in regard to the placing of an embargo on munitions going to both belligerents is a most important pronouncement, and I also agree, after the condemnation of Japan which we have heard from the Leader of the Opposition, from the Foreign Secretary himself, and from the right...

Orders of the Day — Supply. (27 Feb 1933)

Mr David Mason: Let me continue the narrative and the Committee can judge for themselves how successful or unsuccessful he was. I suggested to him that his answers in the House indicated that he, representing the British Government, did not intend to do anything, and his reply was Chat I was a bloody-minded pacifist. That was his conception of ordinary Members of the House trying to bring what influence they...

Orders of the Day — Supply. (27 Feb 1933)

Mr David Mason: If the right hon. Gentleman will allow me, I admit the advantage he has scored about the time, but as he referred in rather scathing terms to a private conversation, the Committee may think we met casually. He must remember, I am sure, that publicly before hon. Members, he asked me to come out with him into the Lobby. It is because of that fact that I referred to the conversation.

Orders of the Day — London Passenger Transport Bill.: Clause 30. — (Representations by local authorities as to withdrawal, reduction of or need for services provided or to be provided, by the board.) (13 Feb 1933)

Mr David Mason: I rather agree with the last speaker, but perhaps the hon. Member for West Bermondsey (Dr. Salter), who moved the Amendment, was not quite conscious of what it implied. There is a provision later in the Clause which reads as follows: Provided that the rates tribunal in determining an application under this Section shall have regard to the desirability of the establishment and maintenance by...

Orders of the Day — London Passenger Transport Bill.: Clause 30. — (Representations by local authorities as to withdrawal, reduction of or need for services provided or to be provided, by the board.) (13 Feb 1933)

Mr David Mason: Well, I suggest that we should not leave out this rates tribunal. The Minister could not provide for an adequate reserve fund, and so on, and do all the things which the tribunal has to do. Both are necessary, it seems to me, and with all respect to the hon. and learned Member for East Bristol, with whose speech I am largely in agreement,

Business of the House. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: Has the right hon. Gentleman any further information to give us with regard to negotiations in connection with the American debt?

Business of the House. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: And whether, during the Recess, he contemplates taking the initiative in regard to bringing this question up for review?

Monetary Reform. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: That was before.

Monetary Reform. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: Will the hon. Gentleman explain what is the difference in principle between what he called the Gold Standard of 1914 and the gold exchange standard?

Monetary Reform. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: It was amazing to hear the speech of the hon. Member for Chislehurst (Mr. Smithers). When an hon. Member gets up in this House and suggests that we should push America and France off the Gold Standard, and does not tell us how we are to do it, except by refusing to take in more of their imports, one is at a loss to know how to reply. There is no sinister design on the part of either France or...

Monetary Reform. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: Hon. Members might at least try to learn the elements of finance. I do not pose as an expert and an authority, but I have made a little study of these matters, and I put it to the hon. Gentleman, who is very kind in speaking of my consistency, as the real reason for what is called the high price of gold bullion. It is not because of the high price of gold bullion since we went off the Gold...

Monetary Reform. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: The fall in sterling prices has not quite followed it because of inflation in this country. Suppose you are importing raw cotton to-morrow. When the pound is at parity you can get 4 dollars 86 cents for it, but to-day you can only get 3 dollars 20 cents. That means that the pound has fallen in purchasing power. Is not that so 7 I have a pound and I exchange it for raw cotton. Am I not better...

Monetary Reform. (21 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: It will help America in the sense of giving stability to exchange.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Ministry of Labour. (19 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: With regard to the sum of £10,000 mentioned, what exactly are the duties to be performed for expediting these schemes?

Reparations and War Debts. (14 Dec 1932)

Mr David Mason: Does the right hon. and learned Gentleman advocate inflation?


Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.