Results 241–260 of 458 for speaker:Mr David Mason

Finance [Post Office Fund]. (24 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: What will the right hon. Gentleman do with this money?

Business of the House. (11 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: May I ask the right hon. Gentleman, in view of the fact that it was ruled out of order last night, to amend the Exchange Equalisation Bill and that it was not definitely stated that it would not be possible to incorporate such an Amendment in the Finance Bill, whether he will bear in mind the wishes expressed to him so well by the right hon. Gentleman the Leader of the Opposition when we come...

Orders of the Day — Exchange Equalisation Account Bill.: Clause 1. — (Amendment of s. 24 (4) of 22 & 23 Geo. 5. c. 25.) (10 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I have a manuscript Amendment which proposes, in page 1, line 6, at the beginning, to insert the words: Subject to the Comptroller and Auditor-General having reported to Parliament on the thirtieth day of September of each year regarding the administration of the fund, and having presented a statement giving a valuation of the fund as on the thirty-first day of March preceding, and having...

Orders of the Day — Exchange Equalisation Account Bill.: Clause 1. — (Amendment of s. 24 (4) of 22 & 23 Geo. 5. c. 25.) (10 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: The Amendment which I hoped to have the pleasure of moving represents a view held by many hon. Members. May I ask why you rule it out of order? It is an Amendment asking whether we cannot have a report or a valuation before we vote this large sum of money.

Orders of the Day — Exchange Equalisation Account Bill.: Clause 1. — (Amendment of s. 24 (4) of 22 & 23 Geo. 5. c. 25.) (10 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I would ask you, Mr. Chairman, whether it is possible, within the limits of this Bill, to move such an Amendment, or—

Orders of the Day — Exchange Equalisation Account Bill.: Clause 1. — (Amendment of s. 24 (4) of 22 & 23 Geo. 5. c. 25.) (10 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I beg to move, in page I, line 11, to leave out the words "three hundred and fifty," and to insert instead thereof the words "two hundred." I have been asked by my hon. Friend the Member for Huddersfield (Mr. Mabane) to move this Amendment on his behalf. It is very difficult in a very narrow Bill such as this to move any Amendment. It is an extraordinarily narrow Bill, and the only possible...

Orders of the Day — Exchange Equalisation Account Bill.: Clause 1. — (Amendment of s. 24 (4) of 22 & 23 Geo. 5. c. 25.) (10 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I am endeavouring to give reasons why I move the reduction of the amount and to persuade the Committee that we should not vote this large sum. If I can show that the principle of the Bill for which this sum of money is asked, is unsound, I hope that will come within your Ruling.

Orders of the Day — Exchange Equalisation Account Bill.: Clause 1. — (Amendment of s. 24 (4) of 22 & 23 Geo. 5. c. 25.) (10 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I shall endeavour to keep within your Ruling. My object is to reduce this amount in order to reduce the mischief which the Bill may do to as small a compass as possible, and to lessen the evil. I am very much confined as to the arguments which I can submit but I do not believe the Committee appreciate the danger involved in this proposal. In the whole history of Parliament I do not think...

Oral Answers to Questions — Post Office.: Salary Cuts. (8 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: 21. asked the Postmaster-General whether, in view of the action of certain industrial companies in restoring the cuts in the salaries of their employés, His Majesty's Government propose to follow this example in the case of the employés in the Post Office?

Exchange Equalisation Account [Money]. (4 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: With much of what the hon. Member for Farnham (Sir A. M. Samuel) has said I agree, and in general I agree with the views expressed by the hon. and learned Member for East Bristol (Sir S. Cripps) for a declaration of Government policy. We are all desirous of knowing what is the Government's policy. We may differ as to our views on currency problems, but when the Chancellor of the Exchequer...

Exchange Equalisation Account [Money]. (4 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I am sorry if I put too great an honour upon the hon. Member. Under the Finance Act of 1932, Section 7, it is provided that: This account shall In every year until it is wound up be examined by the Comptroller and Auditor-General in such manner as he in his discretion thinks proper, with a view to ascertaining whether the operations of and in connection with the account have been in...

Exchange Equalisation Account [Money]. (4 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: It involved a liability of £150,000,000, and he is now asking for a further £200,000,000. One cannot tell what it will cost if he gets back eventually to the old parity. If he takes out his balance to-day it might show a small profit, but we are only temporarily off the Gold Standard. Even the Chancellor of the Exchequer will agree that that is the case. I want to know, seeing that we have...

Exchange Equalisation Account [Money]. (4 May 1933)

Mr David Mason: I will deal with one thing at a time. I am trying to show that if the right hon. Gentleman would tell us what his policy is we should be able to estimate whether it is wise or the reverse to give him power to incur a further expenditure of £200,000,000. We shall lose a large part of that £200,000,000, which is to be used for purchasing gold bullion. If he intends to get back to parity and...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment of Law. (27 Apr 1933)

Mr David Mason: I am sure that the right hon. Gentleman who has just spoken will not expect me to follow him into the intricacies and the technicalities of the taxation of beer. All of us will agree that the right hon. Gentleman could have taken no part in bringing pressure on the Treasury with regard to this proposed taxation. On the contrary it will be within the memory of some hon. Members that when the...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment of Law. (27 Apr 1933)

Mr David Mason: Then perhaps the right hon. Gentleman will unite with me in trying to elicit from the Government whether their policy is to maintain the honour of this country and get back to the old parity, or to alter the parity in a manner which has been suggested in the public press. Suppose that you were to establish our currency on a different parity, say at about the existing rate of exchange, I...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment of Law. (27 Apr 1933)

Mr David Mason: That is why I am asking the right hon. Gentleman to unite with those of us who are fighting for sound finance and a sound currency. This is a subject which ought to appeal to the right hon. Gentleman and his colleagues. They talk of wages but if the £ is stabilised at a parity different from the old parity, with a lower content of gold, it will mean a reduction of wages throughout the length...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment of Law. (27 Apr 1933)

Mr David Mason: That is a very proper question and my object in offering these observations is to show how people can buy them. I think if you can by increasing the demand—[HON. MEMBERS: "Hear, hear!"] I have tried to show how you could increase the demand. I have pointed out on a previous occasion how, about the middle of last century, £150,000,000 was spent in this country on the development of railways...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment of Law. (27 Apr 1933)

Mr David Mason: I am coming to that. I am trying to show the analogy if the right hon. Gentleman will be patient with me. That vast expenditure brought about an increased demand. Workmen were fully employed and agriculture flourished because there was this vast expenditure. The difficulty to-day is this. The Government are just as anxious as we are to bring about an increased demand and I am in favour of...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means.: Amendment of Law. (27 Apr 1933)

Mr David Mason: I am quite in favour of that too but I ask the right hon. Gentleman to take a bigger view. You will never in this little island keep 45,000,000 employed, prosperous and happy by means of palliatives. It is useless to imagine that we can live on each other. We live by our foreign trade and the question is how we can restore our foreign trade. I have tried in a humble way to show how we can do...


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