Results 1–20 of 2418 for speaker:Mr Woodrow Wyatt

Oral Answers to Questions — Industry (Influenza Epidemics) (16 Apr 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: asked the Prime Minister whether he will co-ordinate the activities of the Secretary of State for Social Services and the Secretary of State for Employment and Productivity in order to reduce the adverse effects of influenza epidemics upon industry.

Oral Answers to Questions — Industry (Influenza Epidemics) (16 Apr 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: As the Prime Minister has been singularly unlucky in reducing the number of days lost by strikes, which have actually doubled in their rate since last June when the Government abandoned their trade union legislation, would it not be a good idea to make an effort in this field where it is generally accepted that vaccination could reduce the number of days lost through 'flu' by about 30 per cent?

Oral Answers to Questions — Royal Commission on Poverty (16 Apr 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: asked the Prime Minister whether he will recommend the appointment of a Royal Commission on Poverty.

Oral Answers to Questions — Royal Commission on Poverty (16 Apr 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: Why is the Prime Minister so complacent about this matter? Would it not be a very good thing to have an up-to-date definition of what poverty really is, including child poverty—[HON. MEMBERS: "You do not know what it is."]—plus some practical recommendations on how to alleviate it scientifically and financially in a way which might be adopted, rather than not adopted as most other Royal...

Oral Answers to Questions — Housing (17 Mar 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. In order that Questions to my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister may be dealt with more expeditiously, could not we have a quarter of an hour on Mondays and Wednesdays for electioneering, and could not we have injury time for points of order during Questions to my right hon. Friend?

Business of the House (5 Mar 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: What is my right hon. Friend doing about getting implemented the recommendation of the Select Committee on Procedure in 1959 that the convention of Privy Councillors having an automatic right to speak in debates should be cancelled? Does he not realise that most of our debates are wrecked by all these extinct volcanoes trying to erupt?

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: I hope that this will be the last time that we will debate the internal affairs of Nigeria. It has become distressing to hear the patronising neo-colonialists from both sides of the House trying to tell the Nigerians what to do and how to do it, as though black people were always to be under instructions, either from the extreme Right wing or from the do-gooders of the extreme Left wing. That...

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: I never heard my right hon. Friend, as Minister of Defence, when ordering arms from America, saying that that gave the Americans the right to interfere in our internal affairs.

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: I never heard him suggest that at the end of the war the American Government, who obviously much preferred Winston Churchill to Mr. Attlee, had the right to insist on the election of Mr. Churchill because they had given us arms and Lend-Lease.

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: I must insist to my right hon. Friend that the parallel is exact. He ordered arms from America and would not in the least dream of their interfering with our affairs. He did not just say, "Let us use our influence in Nigeria." He said that we had the right to intervene. We have not got that right. One of the great troubles in this whole affair has been the extraordinary bias shown by some of...

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: I am trying to be fair-minded. I know that it is an attitude which is foreign to my right hon. Friend, but it may be possible for others of us to try to be balanced in this matter. The Press is over-sensitive when it is attacked itself. It immediately starts crying, "Freedom of the Press", or "Censorship", and all that kind of rubbish. But there is no reason to suppose that Lord Hunt, Sir...

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: The Editor of The Times has run a very different policy in his paper from that which has been run by the Sunday Times, whose editor does not happen to be a Roman Catholic. The Editor of the Sunday Times has maintained throughout an objective and consistent reporting of the situation which has not been shown by The Times.

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: I wish that my hon. Friend would not get so angry. I have had to listen to an awful lot of rubbish from him in the past. Even this morning, The Times put the Hunt Report at the bottom of page 4, compressing the 8,000 words of that report into an 800-word tendentiously selected and slanted account of what the report says. It puts it under a sneering headline, "Optimistic Hunt", as though the...

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: Because I am trying to answer some of the silly things which are said.

Nigeria (Relief Plans) (26 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: No, I will not give way again. This sort of interference will not help aid. We shall only put up the backs of the Nigerian authorities. It could create in their minds the attitude, "To hell with it and to hell with them. We shall not do anything about aid". That would be the attitude if it were not for the fact that General Gowon is a remarkable man, a great statesman, a generous and...

Nigeria (22 Jan 1970)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: Is it not the case that Miss Bridget Bloom, who went on exactly the same journalistic tour as all the other reporters, wrote in this morning's Financial Times a very balanced account which was far more in line with the views of Lord Hunt and Sir Colin Thornley than that of most of the other reporters? Would it not be a good idea if the B.B.C. and the I.T.V. and the rest of the Press reported...

Oral Answers to Questions — Local Government and Regional Planning: Questions to the Prime Minister (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: When the Prime Minister says "With permission, I will answer Questions Nos. Q.1 and Q.3 together", whose permission is he seeking and who is giving the permission?

Council of Europe (Greece) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: While agreeing with the Government's attitude, will my right hon. Friend assure the House that Greece will be readmitted when she has reached at least the same democratic standards as Turkey, which is a member of the Council of Europe and has the jolly habit of executing Prime Ministers and Cabinet Ministers—or is it that Turkey is so far away that we do not know what goes on there and do...

Foreign Affairs (9 Dec 1969)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: What could be the purpose of an arms embargo, even supposing the other countries agreed, because it would only pave the way to the most ghastly forms of smuggling which would not shorten the war? Indeed, the war might last longer if they had to fall back on using bows and arrows.

Oral Answers to Questions — Social Services: Pensions (3 Nov 1969)

Mr Woodrow Wyatt: asked the Secretary of State for Social Services whether he will discontinue the payment of weekly 6d. pensions in cases where the recipient is in receipt of no other pensions.


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.