Results 1–20 of 5798 for speaker:Mr Arthur Woodburn

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (20 Apr 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: I am interested in the argument. I agree that it is important. But will the right hon. Gentleman define, in terms of how much off the income tax, what sweeping reductions in direct taxation mean? It sounds very big. Does it mean 6d., as has been suggested, or Is.? What are sweeping reductions in income tax?

Oral Answers to Questions — Criminal Law (Law Commission's Recommendations) (7 Apr 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: In view of the figures for violent crime, will the Prime Minister ask the Law Commission to consider whether it would be a good idea to intimate to criminals that anyone carrying a deadly weapon would be liable to have five years added to any sentence which would otherwise be imposed upon him, and so stop the carrying of weapons?

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport: Honours System and Ministerial Patronage (24 Mar 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: Would the Prime Minister consider, in looking into this matter, whether there is any way in which people who desert this country in order to avoid taxation or who support the rebel government in Rhodesia could have their Honours withdrawn?

Northern Ireland (Incidents, Derry) (24 Mar 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: I appeal, through you, Mr. Speaker, to the hon. and gallant Member for Down, South (Captain Orr), who is bringing this House into disrepute by insisting on a course of action which he knows it is impossible for the Chair to condone. The hon. and gallant Member is placing the Chair in such a position that he is bringing the House into disrepute. On that ground, I hope that he will withdraw and...

Orders of the Day — Rate Support Grant (Scotland) (3 Mar 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: Is not the hon. Gentleman aware that interest charges are high all over the world? Is he suggesting that the Government have caused that, as well?

Orders of the Day — Britain and the European Communities (White Paper) (25 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: The right hon. Member for Brighton, Pavilion (Mr. Amery) will excuse me if I do not follow him; because I agree with much of what he said. I have listened to the debate with great interest. There have been some very fine speeches. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs gave a wonderful exposition of the case for the Market. The Devil's advocate, as...

Orders of the Day — Britain and the European Communities (White Paper) (25 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: The Treaty of Rome says that the whole of Europe should sit around the same table and discuss Europe's affairs. Viewing the matter logically, we are in Europe, our firms are in Europe, much of our trade is in Europe, and many of our people travel to Europe. When one can go from here to Paris in half an hour, artificial barriers are an anachronism. It takes about three or four days for a lorry...

Orders of the Day — Britain and the European Communities (White Paper) (25 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: That will happen in any case. One thing which one cannot get people to realise is that no one can put more cabbages on the table than he grows in his garden. Every housewife knows this, but many expert economists do not seem to. The Chancellor has great difficulty in convincing our people that they cannot consume more than they produce. So that problem will have to be solved anyway. What we...

Britain and the European Communities (White Paper) (24 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: My right hon. Friend is mentioning a figure of £1,000 million, which is to cross the financial frontier. How will this get across the financial frontier unless the Community buys the goods from us?

Britain and the European Communities (White Paper) (24 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: It is happening in South America.

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Employment (18 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: Will not my right hon. Friend have an analysis made to show how modernisation in the mines, in agriculture and in many other industries has reduced male employment? Is not this a penalty for going into the scientific age?

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Murder (Punishment) (18 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. Would not the hon. Member's Question amount to a criminal offence outside this House of murmuring the judges, who are not responsible to the Executive for the administration of justice?

Orders of the Day — Scotland (Fee-Paying Schools) (2 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: I am very interested in the hon. Gentleman's remarks about who is going to sabotage whom. Is he saying that it should be the declared intention of Glasgow and Edinburgh to disobey the decisions of Parliament and to try to frustrate what Parliament has passed in an Act of Parliament? Does he approve of Labour members of councils doing the same, should a Conservative Government ever come to power?

Orders of the Day — Scotland (Fee-Paying Schools) (2 Feb 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: I do not know whether the hon. Gentleman knows where in Edinburgh the Royal High School is, but there is very little population there, so the pupils will have to travel. The hon. Gentleman makes two suggestions. First, that there is selection by merit. That would not be denied in a comprehensive school. Children in comprehensive schools go into streams according to merit. The second point is...

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Teachers (21 Jan 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: Will my hon. Friend take note of the fact that there is reported to be a large return of scientists who went to America with the so-called "brain drain", and there are likely to be a number of scientists becoming redundant due to the restriction of our own research programme? Cannot they be recruited for schools?

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Forestry Commission (Employees) (21 Jan 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: Is the Minister aware that the Land Commission made an exhaustive investigation into the possibility of using these deer forests for forestry and agricultural purposes, but that there is a severe limit to any economic possibility of making proper use of them?

Oral Answers to Questions — National Finance: Taxation Revenue (20 Jan 1970)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: Do the Government impose taxes to punish people, or to provide services?

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. Is it not the case that voting for postponement means voting for the Motion before the House, and that the House is entitled four years later, to come to a conclusion?

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: The hon. Gentleman will be aware that we already incarcerate for life, without hope of release, people who are slightly dangerous mentally, and they are never likely to commit a murder because they are kept from so doing by being in prison. No one seems to have any sympathy for them.

Capital Punishment (15 Dec 1969)

Mr Arthur Woodburn: I should like to understand the position. There seems to be an assumption that any decision of this House is binding on Parliaments for ever. Is it not the case that at any time that the need arose Parliament could introduce fresh legislation to enforce capital punishment? What is all the fuss about?


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