Results 121–140 of 737 for speaker:Mr John Wheatley

Orders of the Day — Women's Disabilities Bill (25 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: There is no statutory counterpart to Clause 1 in Scottish law. The procedure adopted is part of the general procedure of what we call the law of diligence and which, I understand, is known in England as the law of distress. By this law a person can, by decree of the court, use diligence against anyone who has money in his possession belonging to the respondent. A decree obtained by a wife or...

Orders of the Day — Women's Disabilities Bill (25 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Would the hon. Member explain his objection to making provision for people whom we can get hold of and who have money?

Orders of the Day — Women's Disabilities Bill (25 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Does not the hon. Member appreciate that the statutory tenant, under the Rent Restrictions Acts, is in exactly the same position?

Orders of the Day — Women's Disabilities Bill (25 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: No. I meant the circumstances where the husband who is the tenant dies and, under the Rent Restrictions Acts, the wife becomes the statutory tenant.

Orders of the Day — Women's Disabilities Bill (25 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Only with landlords.

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Bill: Clause 5. — (Evasion of Charges.) (24 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: May I ask one of the Ministers to give a very short explanation of the justification of this particular Clause? This Clause introduces into the National Health Service something entirely new, and instead of making beneficiaries under the Health Service it imposes charges and also penal provisions against the people who come under the Service. It goes on first to give a person the right to...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Bill: Clause 5. — (Evasion of Charges.) (24 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: But will the right hon. Gentleman admit that this is a direct result of the introduction of these charges? It was something which could not have flowed from the charges which were provided in the Act of last year. Consequently, if the right hon. Gentleman is allowing such sums to be recovered by way of civil debt, why not consider that as sufficient remedy for the people administering the...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Bill: Clause 5. — (Evasion of Charges.) (24 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Would not there be available an ordinary common law charge of attempted fraud? Why introduce this into the structure of the National Health Service where it has not appeared before? Surely the right hon. Gentleman consulted the Law Officers on this matter, including the Law Officers of Scotland?

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: In my submission, Mr. Speaker, there are two points that arise in this point of order. First of all there is the competency of the Motion; and second, the form in which the Motion has been tabled. I respectfully submit to you, on the question of competency, that in so far as this House has laid down Standing Order No. 41 as the normal procedure governing the guillotine procedure in Committee...

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: First of all, that was in relation to procedure regulating a Committee upstairs.

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: In any event, this to quoque form of argument gets us nowhere. The theme song of the Government in relation to these procedural matters would appear to be "Anything you can do I can do better." Unfortunately for them, in the light of experience it is turning out that they are doing it much worse. But whether it was right or wrong in 1947 is not a matter we are discussing at the present...

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Well, it is a pity for the hon. Gentleman, because his education might have been a bit advanced if I had been. Be that as it may, we are considering the question as it affects the House at the present time, and I and my hon. and right hon. Friends are exercised about this derogation of your powers, Mr. Speaker, which is embodied in this Motion, and accordingly I think we should be very...

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: That is not my point, if I may say so with respect. My point is that this Motion is not in proper form, in that it contains a number of propositions, some of which might be acceptable to an hon. Member and others not acceptable. Accordingly, he would be in the very difficult position of having to vote either against the Motion as a whole or in favour of it, when he was prepared to vote one...

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: With respect, we are dealing with a substantive Motion which eventually has either to be carried by the House or rejected by the House. [HON. MEMBERS: "As amended."] It may or may not be amended, but at the end of the day a person who had voted for an Amendment which had been rejected would find himself perhaps in the position of being in sympathy of one part of the Motion but totally out of...

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Oh!

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: rose—

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: Would the hon. and learned Gentleman point to any one of those Amendments which he thinks was frivolous or unnecessary?

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: On a point of order. Is not it a reflection on the Chair to say that most of the speeches were irrelevant because, if they were totally irrelevant, as the hon. and learned Gentleman suggests, it was the duty of the Chair to pull up the hon. Member who was speaking.

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: There are two points which arise on these Amendments. The first is to expand the amount of time devoted to the Committee stage by two days, and the other is to re-institute the procedure under Standing Order 41. On the other hand, the Government propose to give one day, and the introduction of new procedure to supersede that under Standing Order 41. In respect of both matters, the onus is on...

National Health Service Bill (Time-Table) (23 Apr 1952)

Mr John Wheatley: We at least know from that answer that none of the Amendments were Amendments to which objection could be taken, and, therefore, the only objection which the right hon. Gentleman and his hon. Friends can have is that an undue length of time was taken to discuss them. We on this side of the House do not concede that, but, even assuming that were so, is that a justification for this very rigid...


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