Results 81–100 of 1260 for speaker:Mr Donald Wade

Oral Answers to Questions — National Finance: Small Companies (Death Duties) (5 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Is it correct that the terms of reference of the Royal Commission on Taxation did not cover death duties? Does the hon. Gentleman agree that there is as strong a case for an inquiry into the nature and the effect of death duties as into other forms of taxation?

Oral Answers to Questions — Korea: Chemicals and Synthetic Substitutes (11 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: asked the Minister of Food what investigations of a general nature he is undertaking into the use of chemicals and synthetic substitutes in the production of food; and when he will be in a position to publish the results.

Oral Answers to Questions — Korea: Chemicals and Synthetic Substitutes (11 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Does the Minister agree that in recent years there has been an alarming increase in the use of chemicals in the production and processing of food? Does he agree that there has been no adequate inquiry into either the short-term or the long-term effect on the health of the nation?

Oral Answers to Questions — Korea: Flour Improvers (Investigations) (11 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: asked the Minister of Food to state what progress has been made in the investigations into the existing methods of treatment of flour; and whether he will give an assurance that the process of agenisation will be abandoned.

Oral Answers to Questions — Korea: Flour Improvers (Investigations) (11 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Does the Minister agree that on 31st March, 1952, referring to the Report of the Scientific Committee, he said; in view of its deleterious effect when fed in large quantities to certain animals it was felt that the use of agene should be discontinued." —[OFFICIAL REPORT. 31st March, 1952; Vol. 498, c. 1162.] Is it not time that it should be discontinued?

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army: Personal Case (17 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: asked the Secretary of State for War how long Private Brian M. Jupp, whose plea of conscience was upheld by the advisory tribunal on 15th December, 1952, was imprisoned under sentence by court-martial by reason of his conscientiously objecting to performing military service; and in what prison or prisons he was detained.

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army: Personal Case (17 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Is it not anomalous that one who is found to be a genuine conscientious objector should be compelled to serve a sentence of imprisonment before his case is heard?

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Defence: Conscientious Objectors (18 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Defence whether he will amend the existing procedure relating to National Service men who, after completing their full-time service, develop conscientious objections to part-time service, in order to ensure that such National Service men are not obliged to serve a sentence of imprisonment prior to their plea of conscience being considered...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Defence: Conscientious Objectors (18 Feb 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Does the hon. Gentleman not consider that this procedure is contrary to the principles of justice? Does he agree with his hon. Friend the Under-Secretary of State for War who, in reply to a Question of mine yesterday, said that a person claiming conscientious objection has to provide some form of evidence that he really believes what he says; and does he agree with his hon. Friend that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce: Monopolies Commission (3 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Does the Minister agree that if a policy of de-nationalisation is to lead to an extension of genuine private enterprise, it is absolutely essential that there should be some strengthening of the powers of the Monopolies Commission?

Oral Answers to Questions — Post Office: Union Recognition (Discussions) (11 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: asked the Assistant Postmaster-General whether he has now concluded his consideration of claims for recognition by Post Office unions; what decisions have been reached; and what principles will be applied in considering any future claims which may arise.

Oral Answers to Questions — Post Office: Union Recognition (Discussions) (11 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Can the hon. Gentleman give any indication when a decision will be made, having regard to the fact that approximately nine months have elapsed since the statement that the decision would be deferred for six months? Does the Minister not consider that in future it would be advantageous if there were certain guiding principles, such as those contained in the Listowel formula, which would assist...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: Training College Students (12 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: Does the right hon. Lady agree that it is most important that students should be encouraged to enter teachers' training colleges? Is she satisfied that she is fully informed as to the restrictions imposed at some of these training colleges?

Orders of the Day — Central African Federation (24 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: However deeply the House may be divided on this issue, we are agreed upon one point, and that is that the effects of the decision taken tonight will be very far-reaching, and that a grave responsibility rests upon right hon. and hon. Members. I agree with the right hon. and gallant Member for Kelvingrove (Lieut.-Colonel Elliot) in his opening remarks on that subject, but I do not follow his...

Orders of the Day — Central African Federation (24 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: That is stated in the Constitution.

Orders of the Day — Central African Federation (24 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: I am quite willing to answer the right hon. Gentleman. Under the Constitution, the maximum number of Africans would be nine, unless some of the 26 elected members on the roll are Africans themselves.

Orders of the Day — Central African Federation (24 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: I was coming to that point. I do not wish to evade it. If we study the scheme, the chances of an African being elected as one of the 26 is very small.

Orders of the Day — Central African Federation (24 Mar 1953)

Mr Donald Wade: In 1951, in Southern Rhodesia, the electoral law was altered, as hon. Members will know, increasing the qualifications. The chances of the Constitution being altered in favour of Africans is very remote. If it is altered it will require a two-thirds majority under the present Constitution. It is not unreasonable to assume, looking at it impartially, that there will be no Africans elected...


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