Results 1–20 of 436 for speaker:Mr John Rawlinson

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (22 Dec 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I thank the right hon. Gentleman for what he. has said. I do not think he has quite grasped the. seriousness of this matter for the clergy. As he has just said, it will be a heavy cost, and to poor clergymen it is a very serious matter. The clergyman pays for the cost of collection, which may go up to 3, 4 or 5 per cent., but by this Bill he will have to pay something more, and the poor...

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (22 Dec 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I gather that my hon. and learned Friend assents to that. If that be so, it removes one of my great grievances. The heavy cost of administration will be that of the pool which has been arranged. The question of pooling the tithe will be a very heavy matter in regard to cost, and I want it to be made perfectly clear that the costs of administering the pool, that is, dividing the monies amongst...

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (22 Dec 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I understand, then, that the main expense, the cost of pooling, is to fall entirely on the clergymen, and not on Queen Anne's Bounty.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 39. — [Penalty for drunkenness while in charge of motor car and for reckless driving.] (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I am always pleased-when the Liberal Party step out of the breach, and express their real opinion, but it is only when they are losing a chance of sending someone to jail. How far is it really genuine on this occasion? The hon. and gallant Gentlemen knows as well as I do that if a man is driving recklessly, and knocks over or kills a child, he is guilty of manslaughter and can be sent to for...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 40. — (Prohibition on taking photographs, etc., in Court.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I should like to point out in this case there is no power to send anybody to prison in a general way. It is intended to apply to people who are making a living out of some or other public trial. I hope that the Home Secretary will consider this matter very carefully, and not be led away by what hon. Members on the opposite side of the House have said about the rights of the subject and so...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 40. — (Prohibition on taking photographs, etc., in Court.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I am afraid it will be stopped in future. It will be an infringement of the personal liberty of my hon. and learned Friend. As he is going into the court with his red bag to conduct his case, the photographer will not be allowed to snapshot him.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 40. — (Prohibition on taking photographs, etc., in Court.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: Perhaps that privilege still remains. But what I ask the House to do is to consider the feelings of people who really are deterred from coming forward to give evidence, who are caused genuine pain by having their photographs published far and wide, and in the interests of justice I hope this Clause will be allowed to go through. I am not speaking of the details of it, but, taken as a whole,...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 40. — (Prohibition on taking photographs, etc., in Court.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: Magistrates have no power at all to prevent it.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 40. — (Prohibition on taking photographs, etc., in Court.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: It would be impossible to accept such an Amendment as this, because, if a man snapshotted two or three times in court, it would not be enough merely to prove that he did that; you would have to prove that a photograph was actually taken. It might be that the camera might fail to act, and in that case no photograph would be taken. The mere fact of anyone attempting to take a photograph by...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 44. — (Abolition of presumption of coercion of married woman by husband.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I think the illustration we have just heard across the Floor of the House shows how important this alteration in the law is. As the Solicitor-General has said quite fairly, there are three courses open to us to pursue. Another great statesman said the same thing on a previous occasion. You may keep the law as it exists at present. Except my hon. and learned Friend the Member for Norwood (Mr....

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill.: Clause 44. — (Abolition of presumption of coercion of married woman by husband.) (20 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: In view of the position which the Bill stands, I do not propose to move this Amendment, but I hope the Government will consider it in another place.

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I beg to move, in page 1, line 13, at the end, to add the words: Provided that where any tithe rentcharge is on the appointed day vested in or held in trust for the Universities of Oxford or Cambridge or any of the colleges or houses of learning within either of those universities or any of the colleges of Eton, Win Chester, and Westminster, or any society or body of persons associated...

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I am not in the least in favour of this proposed substitution of the Commissioners of the Treasury for Queen Anne's Bounty, but I think the Solicitor-General said that Queen Anne's Bounty out of their own funds would defray the expenses of investment of these various securities—

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: Yes, of administration. Does that mean, as I hope sincerely it does, doing away with the present very high taxation upon the income of the incumbent of the benefice? Assuming that £100 goes to the incumbent, there is a large sum to come away for the cost of collection; there is a sum which we remember was described as overhead charges—that is to say, the charges of Queen Anne's Bounty in...

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I presume that the. Solicitor-General, in accordance with his answer, will omit the words "the expenses of administration" in Clause 4, page 3, line 19. There is an Amendment down which goes further than that.

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: I pressed this question very strongly in Committee, but I could get no assurance. Reading the Bill as it stands now, it seems to me that the £4 10s. and the £5 must be deducted before the incumbent can get anything at all. The Clause says that the £4 10s. shall be paid to the sinking fund and that the £5 shall be paid to the Inland Revenue Commissioners to be applied by them towards the...

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: May I thank the Solicitor-General. I take the view that it is a great concession and I thank him personally for adding it to the Bill, for at an earlier stage of the evening he seemed to think he would only be able to mention it to us. The provision is now being struck out of the Bill, and it is a great concession. In £9 10s. being paid, £4 10s. goes into the sinking fund and £5 to the...

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (19 Nov 1925)

Mr John Rawlinson: The point is this. A man is perfectly qualified to collect his own tithe. He does it now and has done it for a long time. His successor will wish to do it in future as his predecessor probably has done it in the past. Why should this House say, "You are not to do this any more. You are to employ an agent to do it." Even if it might be a local agent, agents will not work for nothing, and I do...


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.