Results 781–800 of 833 for speaker:Sir Isaac Pitman

Orders of the Day — Technical Education (22 Mar 1946)

Sir Isaac Pitman: Is the hon. Gentleman aware that there are only two ad hoc buildings for technical education for the whole of the enormous area of London?

Orders of the Day — Technical Education (22 Mar 1946)

Sir Isaac Pitman: Before the hon. Member concludes may I ask him a question about a modern school in Bath? There are a first-class secondary grammar school and a first-class technical school. The competition for places in the technical school has gone up enormously. I fear, and I think hon. Members opposite fear, that when a modern school is available, only the "riff raff" will wish to apply for...

Orders of the Day — Technical Education (22 Mar 1946)

Sir Isaac Pitman: It applies everywhere.

SUPPLY [11th March]: Clause 4. — Power of Secretary of State to make amalgamation schemes.) (13 Mar 1946)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I would like to urge that the Home Secretary should give way on this particular Amendment. I represent one of the cities that has received honourable mention, and I have been specially asked to urge the Home Secretary in this particular direction. The right hon. Gentleman has chosen the figure of 100,000, and the hon. Member for Ipswich (Mr. Stokes) has asked why it should be 60,000. It is...

SUPPLY [11th March]: Clause 4. — Power of Secretary of State to make amalgamation schemes.) (13 Mar 1946)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I beg to second the Amendment.

Orders of the Day — Miscellaneous Financial Provisions Bill (1 Mar 1946)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I have two small points to which I would like to draw the attention of the Financial Secretary and to which I would like him to give an answer. The first refers to the question of war damage. May I say, in passing, that I support very strongly what my hon. Friend the Member for East Aberdeen (Mr. Boothby) has said about the importance of the Government paying quickly, and paying partially in...

Orders of the Day — Bank of England Bill (19 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I oppose the Bill because it takes away that most precious thing in all British institutions, the free association of people working freely and beneficially together. It seems to me, as my hon. and gallant Friend the Member for Flint (Lieut.-Colonel Birch) said, that it actually reduces the power of the Government in that respect by a double, and very unnecessary, double-locking of the door....

Orders of the Day — Bank of England Bill (19 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I am against the Bill. In the first place, the Bill is wrong in principle because it takes away something good, the freedom of people to work freely and do a good job because they wish to do it. Secondly, the Bill is unnecessary because on all sides it is agreed that the full powers which the Treasury has had have worked in such a way that the country has had the financial policy of the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce: Stationery (17 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: asked the President of the Board of Trade what quantity of graph paper or other stationery has been imported from the U.S.A. since 30th May, 1945; how much such paper has been supplied for the use of Government departments; to what extent the necessity for this import has been caused by lack of supply of raw material or labour to manufacture in Britain; and whether he is taking action to...

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce: Stationery (17 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: Is the right hon. and learned Gentleman aware that the paper used at Rothampstead Experimental Station appears to be of recent foreign importation?

Orders of the Day — BANK OF ENGLAND (re-committed) BILL (17 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: May I take the opportunity of asking the Chancellor to give us two assurances, one of which he might wish to give us, and about the other I am less sanguine. The first is that in this matter of "greater or less," he will make a disclosure of what the distribution by the Bank is to the Treasury? It seems to me that just as the ordinary company discloses what its distribution is, so the Bank of...

Orders of the Day — BANK OF ENGLAND (re-committed) BILL (17 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: The other point about which I am not quite certain is this. Would the right hon. Gentleman give to the Committee an undertaking that the Bank will not be used as a means of indirect taxation, as the hon. Member for the St. George's Division of Westminster (Mr. Howard) has said, like the Post Office and the B.B.C.? The Chancellor indicated dissent. I was rather afraid that he might give no...

Anglo-American Financial and Economic Discussions (12 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: May I ask a question of the right hon. and learned Gentleman which may be of help to the House as a whole? The words in Section B are a substantial reduction of tariffs and for the elimination of tariff preferences. The apparent anthesis between the elimination of tariff preferences and the reduction of tariffs. Is there anything to prevent it being the reduction or elimination of tariffs and...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (11 Dec 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I wish to raise two points. According to Clause 15, the allowance for lower taxation ceases at £125, so that the full rate of tax of 9s. starts at £125, whereas under the old rate the reduced allowance of 6s. 6d. continued up to £165. The effect of this is that £40 of the earlier income of the workman will come on to the higher rate sooner. I deplore that. I think it will have a very...

Orders of the Day — First Schedule. — (Classes of goods in respect of which Purchase Tax is to cease to be chargeable.) (29 Nov 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I beg to move, in page 53, line 14, at end, add: Office machines, equipment, furniture and forms not capable of use for or adaptable to domestic purposes. —In page 53, line 14, at end, add: Educational equipment and materials supplied through recognised educational suppliers. In line 14, at end, add: Stationery pre-printed or pre-printed and pre-ruled for educational use in such a way that...

Orders of the Day — First Schedule. — (Classes of goods in respect of which Purchase Tax is to cease to be chargeable.) (29 Nov 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: May I ask if the right hon. Gentleman will see a deputation? I think he will co-operate to that extent in order to help in the consideration of this problem between now and then. I do not want to take up the time of the Committee.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 15. — (Increase of certain, reliefs for1946–47 and subsequent years.) (28 Nov 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: It is with great pleasure that I support this Amendment. This is an issue on which I feel very strongly. It is a difficult issue to understand, and it has been made much more difficult because of a certain amount of confusion that has been brought into it. The Chancellor of the Exchequer paid me the compliment of interrupting me on one occasion to say that my arithmetic was wrong. It was...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 15. — (Increase of certain, reliefs for1946–47 and subsequent years.) (28 Nov 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: Under the immediately preceding one, and the one preceding that. A married man with no children, drawing £5,000 a year —in which category I think the right hon. Gentleman is himself —is having a relief of over £219 a year.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 15. — (Increase of certain, reliefs for1946–47 and subsequent years.) (28 Nov 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: That is a point I am coming to later, that these tables are definitely misleading because they dc not take postwar credit into account. The Chancellor of the Exchequer has had this graph, which I have here, and which shows that the peak occurs at £ 204 a year — which is £ 3 18s. 4d. a week. A working man drawing that amount is made to pay 10s. 10d. more tax in this Budget; whereas a...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 15. — (Increase of certain, reliefs for1946–47 and subsequent years.) (28 Nov 1945)

Sir Isaac Pitman: I can give it in figures from the table. I was going to give the table and the graph to the Chancellor, as I did my last graph. This line on the graph represents 1. Every one of these people will be paying that amount more than £1. Here you have £ 2, here you have £ 3 and at the top £ 4. The man with six children pays an additional tax of £ 3 9s. 3d. Again, that is not the sum total of...


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