Results 1–20 of 2800 for speaker:Sir Kenneth Pickthorn

Orders of the Day — Packington Estate, Islington (Council on Tribunals' Report) (2 Mar 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: On a point of order. The Minister has chattered almost continuously throughout every speech except that of his hon. and learned Friend the Member for Dulwich (Mr. S. C. Silkin). Is it in order, Mr. Deputy Speaker, for him to make it so difficult for the rest of us to listen to the debate?

Leasehold Reform (28 Feb 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: The eloquence of the hon. Member for Swansea, East (Mr. McBride) was extremely reminiscent of that of Mr. Lloyd George, but I am not sure that his logic was as good as that of Mr. Lloyd George, at its best. He told us, if I may have his attention—

Leasehold Reform (28 Feb 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: I do not think that that kind of interruption is anything short of cheating. It has nothing whatever to do with the argument, and interruptions are intended for that purpose. I propose to refer particularly to the hon. Gentleman's telling us of a horrible story—apparently, the worst he could think of—in Cardiff, where stories are pretty horrible, as we have been told several times...

Leasehold Reform (28 Feb 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: This is the last time. I bet a shilling that the interruption is not relevant.

Leasehold Reform (28 Feb 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: I do not see the relevance of that interruption. My premonition was perfectly correct. Several hon. Members opposite have suggested that we cannot expect the British people to understand about leaseholds, I can expect the British people to understand about leaseholds. In case there are some hon. Gentlemen or hon. Ladies opposite who are British and do not understand, I will try to make them...

Leasehold Reform (28 Feb 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Will the hon. Member remember that during every one of those fifty years the burden of ground rent has been reduced—every year?

Defence Review (22 Feb 1966)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. Am I wrong—[HON. MEMBERS: "Yes."]—in remembering that this is not a debate, that these are supplementary questions and answers, and that it is extremely difficult to see how those who ask and answer them in the manner we have listened to over the past half hour can be remembering that very important fact?

Foreign Affairs (21 Dec 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Will the hon. Gentleman allow me?

Rhodesia (14 Dec 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Either.

Rhodesia (14 Dec 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Mr. Speaker, this is a sad occasion, perhaps rather sadder than the last occasion on which we discussed such Statutory Instruments. I should like, if I might, to have the attention of the Chief Secretary. I do not want to be more contentious than I must be, but with him I must, of course, be particularly contentious. He told us when he spoke about the special circumstances which now...

Rhodesia (14 Dec 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Surely it cannot be too wide to say that I am sorry that the Attorney-General, although he was here for the first speech of the debate, left at once. I had thought perhaps to go on to regret that the Solicitor-General had not left, but I quite see that there might be some objection to that. "A detailed examination of the legal and constitutional points is absolutely vital." That is what the...

Rhodesia (14 Dec 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Would the right hon. Gentleman permit me to ask a supplementary question? Are they relieved from any disqualification for other jobs which may have been involved in being directors of the Bank when they were so effectively?

Orders of the Day — Agriculture Bill (30 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Sir Kenneth Pickthorn (Carlton) rose——

Orders of the Day — Agriculture Bill (30 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: The right hon. Gentleman must give way to me.

Orders of the Day — Agriculture Bill (30 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: Mr. Speaker, I wish to know why I was picked out, for no reason at all. I am the last person to brawl or to be disorderly, but I think that when a Minister picks out one of his exiguous audience for insult, merely on the grounds that he does not like the expression on his face, the least he can do is to give the person picked out the chance to say what he thinks of the Minister.

Southern Rhodesia (Constitution Order) (24 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: I have listened with extreme envy to all the speeches which have preceded mine. The alacrity with which hon. Members participate in this debate, the confidence with which they recommend some courses, and the even greater confidence with which they damn others, are to me topics of great envy. I find no pleasure in this. I find no certainty. For days and weeks and months, and even years, I...

Southern Rhodesia (Constitution Order) (24 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: I am not going to explain what happened before the war to the hon. and learned Gentleman. This is not the proper occasion, and this kind of chi-iking is not suitable here and now. I do not wish to sound pompous. The greatest affairs are now our responsibility. Everybody who has spoken before me spoke of responsibility, responsibility, responsibility, over and over again. The Attorney-General...

Southern Rhodesia (Constitution Order) (24 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: It really is too impudent to tell us now that we are to study this question. I asked this question on Second Reading of the Enabling Bill. The Attorney-General rode off on the ground that he was so unfamiliar with this kind of legislation he did not understand the question. I raised it again at 6 o'clock this afternoon. It has been raised by my right hon. and learned Friend on the Front...

Southern Rhodesia Bill (15 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: It is extremely disagreeable, when a State is in external danger or difficulty—as ours now is—to put oneself in a posture which might seem grudging in support of one's Government. I have no such intention. What we are—I was going to say fighting for—struggling for, standing for, is said to be law and order. I agree with the hon. Member for Nelson and Colne (Mr. Sydney Silverman)...

Southern Rhodesia Bill (15 Nov 1965)

Sir Kenneth Pickthorn: On a point of order. I am very likely wrong—I frequently am —but it had never occurred to me before that it was the business of the Chair to call interrupters. If one or more persons desire to interrupt, it surely is the decision of the hon. Member who has the Floor by whom, if anyone, he will be interrupted.


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