Results 1–20 of 63 for speaker:Mr Ernest Pickering

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Ministry of Health. (3 Jul 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: I do not intend—it would be foolish for me to try—to cover as much ground as the last speaker, who has taken the whole subject of health as his field. I wish to confine my remarks to the problem of housing, and especially the housing of the poorer-paid working classes. Like the last speaker, I desire to express my appreciation of the work that is being done by the Ministry of Health; it...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Ministry of Health. (3 Jul 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: Will the houses which are to be provided for poorly-paid workers merely replace the slums which have been cleared away, or will they be additional houses?

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Ministry of Health. (20 Jun 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: I am not rising in order to condemn the Minister for what he has done in regard to the housing problem, nor to praise him, but to add a little friendly criticism. I feel in a somewhat embarrassing position in criticising him for not gingering up local authorities more in regard to their housing schemes, because the Minister said to-day that he has not received a scheme from the city which I...

Orders of the Day — Supply. (20 Jun 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: I do not know exactly what my position is in this Debate. There is a good deal that I should like to say, and I do not see how I can say it. I am anxious to see the Minister ginger-up local authorities in the matter of slum clearance, and I would emphasise the point that you cannot separate, as they have been separated to some extent, the problems of re-housing and slum clearance. The law...

Orders of the Day — Japanese Competition. (21 Mar 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: Where does the hon. and gallant Gentleman get his figures from if he says that represents the Japanese wage?

Orders of the Day — Japanese Competition. (21 Mar 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: I do.

Orders of the Day — Industrial Councils Bill. (23 Feb 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: In listening to most debates in this House I must confess that I have sometimes been very much moved by the arguments of the other side, but in this Debate, though I have listened, I think, to every speech but one in opposition to this Bill, I have not received a single gleam of light. The opposition seems to me to be—I do not like to use the word—entirely factious, and merely diehard,...

Orders of the Day — Industrial Councils Bill. (23 Feb 1934)

Mr Ernest Pickering: Are the Government not prepared to make use of this Bill?

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: One of the reasons why I rise to speak is because I have some experience of the foreign country which is very much concerned in this discussion. At the same time I must emphasise the fact that I have a peculiar interest also in the Lancashire cotton industry, because I began my career among the cotton spinners. I have a tremendous interest in them and affection for them, and I long to see...

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: Yes. Every newspaper that I take up refers to sweated labour in Japan and also to slave labour. That is a false idea. I admit that the wages in Japan are lower than they are here, but they are not so low as the Lancashire people are told they are.

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: In the cotton industry—not taking the yen at its present value in our money, which would not be fair, because its purchasing power in Japan to-day is the same as it was 12 months ago—the lowest wages paid are from 10s. to 12s. a week and the wages rise to about 42s. That is the actual value of the wages. [HON. MEMBERS: "No."] I went to see Mr. Matsuyama myself, because I wanted to verify...

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: I have said that I regard the conditions in Japan as different from what they are here. The yen has not depreciated as far as the purchasing power of the workers in Japan is concerned. It has about the same purchasing power as it had 12 months ago, and it is no use insisting on the depreciated value of the yen in the matter of its purchasing power in Japan.

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: The purchasing power of the yen is about the same, but already there is a demand for an increase in wages and there is a tendency for the yen to purchase less.

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: The longest working hours are nine hours a day. I am not trying to justify all that is done in Japan. I ask the House to face facts and to realise that the conditions are not such that you can dismiss Japanese competition as being a competition which no decent industry ought to be called upon to meet. That is the point. The great thing about Japanese labour is that it is very skilled. A...

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: That is the statement of this Bombay manufacturer, show- ing the superior skill of the Japanese over the Indian worker.

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: Yes, automatic looms. I should like the House to realise that we have to deal with a class of worker who is well educated and who is becoming more and more conscious of his rights, whose wages are getting higher, and who is advancing towards a higher standard of living. Forty years ago rice was not even the diet of the workers, they had to live on something coarser still. Now they are getting...

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: May I ask if the hon. and gallant Member is attributing that view to me?

Trade and Commerce: Japanese Competition. (28 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: I should like to correct the hon. and gallant Member on that point. My friendship is for Lancashire in this matter, and I wanted to put what I thought was the truth of the situation in order that Lancashire might benefit.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce.: Ottawa Agreements (Australia). (11 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: 23. asked the Secretary of State for Dominion Affairs whether, in view of the fact that the Australian Government still maintain a duty ranging from 100 to 300 per cent. on United Kingdom hosiery and knitwear, he will furnish this House with the basic rate of wages in the hosiery and knitwear industry in this country and Australia?

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade and Commerce.: Ottawa Agreements (Australia). (11 Jul 1933)

Mr Ernest Pickering: Is the right hon. Gentleman not aware of the fact that the English industry claims that the basic rates in this country are as high as in any part of the world, and what other things account for these exceptionally high duties?


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