Results 101–120 of 3647 for speaker:Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause I. — (Privileges, immunities and capacities of certain international organisations and their staffs.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I appreciate the intention of the Government in proposing this Amendment but I want to ask the Minister of State whether he will not go a little further, not as to the words but as to giving an undertaking. A great deal of the doubts that have been and are still being expressed with regard to the whole matter of the Bill arises from the obsolete character of these immunities and privileges...

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Surely, the hon. and learned Gentleman is under a complete misapprehension as to the effect of the words in the Clause. The effect is that the House of Commons, equally with another place, has a positive initiative in this matter. The Orders in Council do not arise at all unless this House has previously presented—

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: If I am incorrect in that, I will not proceed with my argument.

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: When I intervened a little while ago, I had not quite grasped that there were two types of Orders in Council that would, if the Amendment were carried, conflict with Clause 1. As I understand it, Clause 2 will apply both to Orders in Council under the original Bill and also to that particular type of Order in Council under the Amendment we have carried to Clause 1.

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I quite understand that, but do I understand the Attorney-General to say that the provisions in the Clause now under consideration do not apply to an Order in Council carried as an Amendment? It is an important point. If they do not apply, then the result of the Amendment carried just recently, at the invitation of the hon. Member for Colchester (Mr. Lewis), definitely brings Sections 1 and 2...

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I still do not understand the learned Attorney-General's point. Do I understand him now to say that Sub-section (4) of Clause 2 will not apply to the Orders in Council which have been carried in the Amendment relating to Sub-section (2, c) of Clause I.

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: So that in fact the Bill can be extended for a further period of five years by the introduction of a fresh Order in Council.

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I will try to make it a little clearer. The Bill runs for five years. Before the expiry of five years an Order in Council can be laid in both Houses of Parliament for the provision to be extended.

Orders of the Day — DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (EXTEN-SION) BILL [Lords]: Clause 2. — (Provisions as to Orders in Council.) (24 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: It is rather complicated, but Clause 2 (4) refers to "any such Order in Council." If these words relate to the new Amendments in Clause 1, Sub-section (2c) that enables the Government to modify or revoke an Order in Council which has been extended for five years by another one. I may be wrong, but perhaps the Attorney-General will look into the matter. It is rather difficult on the spur of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Demobilisation: Resettlement Grants (19 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: asked the Minister of Labour whether he has reached a decision in reference to demobilisation, on the establishment of a system of resettlement grants to enable those who on being called up had to give up businesses to restart; and whether he is making arrangements for special training in business management in order to prevent the exploitation of ex-Servicemen on their return.

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Civil Aviation (White Paper) (17 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: asked the Secretary of State for Air whether in view of the forthcoming international conference he is now in a position to state the Government's policy for the post-war ordering of international civil air transport.

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Civil Aviation (White Paper) (17 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Will the Deputy Prime Minister say whether, after this White Paper is in the hands of Members, if there is a desire for a Debate, he will arrange through the usual channels to have an opportunity for discussion?

Orders of the Day — Clause 2. — (Immediate division of constituencies having electorates exceeding 100,000.) (12 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I certainly cannot claim to speak for the Speaker's Conference. All I can do is to try to present to the Home Secretary the views that I hold and held during the Speaker's Conference, and which I imagine influenced my colleagues who sat with me on that body under the control of Mr. Speaker. These considerations were in our minds. In the first place, we realised that there might be a very...

Orders of the Day — Clause 6. — (Exception of university constituencies.) (12 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Thank you, Mr. Williams, for putting into other words precisely the answer that I should have given to the hon. and learned Member. I am not proposing to disclose in any particular the debates or discussions which took place in the Conference, but I am giving the point of view of those who came to the Conference with a desire to arrive, under the guidance of Mr. Speaker, at agreed solutions....

Orders of the Day — Clause 6. — (Exception of university constituencies.) (12 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Perhaps I may explain. I have not the document here, but if the Minister looks at it I think he will see that in another part of it it says that it must not necessarily be taken that a decision was unanimous when it is recorded that there was no Division and no vote was taken.

Orders of the Day — LIABILITIES (WAR-TIME ADJUST MENT) BILL [Lords] (11 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I do not rise for the purpose of delaying the House in coming to a decision on this important Bill. I think we are greatly indebted to the Attorney-General for the description he has given of the various amendments in the law which are being made. They, of course, cover a very wide range of detailed points, and I have no intention of going over those details again. I propose to confine...

Orders of the Day — House of Commons (Redistri Bution of Seats) Bill (10 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: In regard to the exceedingly interesting points just put before the House by the hon. Member for Twickenham (Mr. Keeling), I should like to say that they are, of course, as my hon. Friend will recognise, largely Committee points, and no doubt he will have an opportunity of putting his views on this matter in Committee. So far as I am concerned, I shall listen with the greatest attention to...

Orders of the Day — House of Commons (Redistri Bution of Seats) Bill (10 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I do not think that you can compare those countries with this country and I will leave that to the hon. Member to develop in his own way. I say that it is likely to make for more sections and more factions. It is not at all impossible that there might become a religious faction in this House, and there might be sections returned to promote various nostrums, all of which might be inimical to...

Orders of the Day — Town and Country Planning Bill: Clause 45. — (Assessment of compensation in connection with acquisition of land for public purposes by reference to 1939 prices.) (6 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I have no desire to enter into the discussion as to the merits of the particular form of Debate we should have. I prefer to deal with the position put by the Prime Minister. I have, of course, listened with very great attention, and if I may say so, with sympathetic attention, to what he has put before us. I appreciate the large background on which he sees the Debate on this Clause, and I...

Orders of the Day — Town and Country Planning Bill: Clause 45. — (Assessment of compensation in connection with acquisition of land for public purposes by reference to 1939 prices.) (6 Oct 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I think the proposal of the Prime Minister is more indefinite than it ought to be. The only promise I heard the Prime Minister give was that these Clauses would be introduced in another Bill before the appointed day. That sounds like a fairly definite promise, but inasmuch as the appointed day is not as yet appointed, and it is for the Government to say when they will appoint it, it is trying...


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