Results 61–80 of 3647 for speaker:Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill: Second Schedule. — (Registration as Local Government Elector.) (23 Jan 1945)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I recognise that, Mr. Speaker, but perhaps I may be allowed to say that I prefer the Bill in the form in which it is coming before us on Third Reading to any changes which some of my Liberal friends would desire to see in it. On the other point to which they have taken exception, there is a feature of it in the Bill and, therefore, I think I should be in Order in referring to it—the plural...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill: New Clause. — (Abolition of plural voting.) (17 Jan 1945)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I think it only courteous to the hon. Lady the Member for Anglesey—I do not think she should yet be called "Noble Lady"; it is on the Order Paper but it is incorrect—[HON. MEMBERS: "She will be"]—to say a few words on this Clause. She has put forward the case of the plural vote, and this perhaps of all the matters raised in this Bill is the one really party political issue, and I think...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill: New Clause. — (Abolition of plural voting.) (17 Jan 1945)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I quite agree with that statement, which is perfectly correct. I intended to explain later on that this compromise only binds those who actually took part in it. It certainly does not bind my hon. Friend, and it does not bind people who were not actually members of the Speaker's Conference. Before I come to that, however, I would like to cast one eye upon the practical effect of what is left...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: As a Member of the Speaker's Conference, I supported all of the more important recommendations of that Conference, and I am very happy to find to-day that, in the main, at any rate, those recommendations are embodied in the present Bill, and that the House of Commons, in their discussion to-day, have, with few exceptions, supported the Bill. The main point is, of course, that of the...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I did not misunderstand the hon. and gallant Member, but I think that he has misunderstood the objection to his argument. I am not discussing Service people away from home, but Service personnel when they come back. At that time, owing to the shortage of houses, a great many of them will be lodgers in the constituency and it is of the essence of the old system of municipal voters that the...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I quite appreciate that, but I am pointing out what an absurd result it would produce. It would mean that a man coming into a constituency would not get a vote, but would remain a voter in a place which he has left and from which, presumably, his interests have departed, and although the hon. Member says that the inconvenience would only be for a time, it would be for a continuing number of...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: On that point of Order, Mr. Speaker. I was speaking only for myself, and how it appeared to me and, presumably, to my friends at the Conference. I am not revealing anything which should not be made public.

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I fully agree with your Ruling, Mr. Speaker. I did not disclose anything that took place at the Conference. I only said that those who considered the question, came to the con- clusion that Proportional Representation was an impossible institution to introduce into the country as a whole. Regarding the plural vote, I would remind the hon. Member for Skipton that on matters which were...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Is it not really four months and eight months?

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill (19 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Before the hon. and learned Gentleman leaves that point—perhaps I am asking something unreasonable—has he any idea of the approximate numbers that will be involved in this exception — tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, or is it as many as a million?

Orders of the Day — Poland (15 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I once spent a very unhappy weekend. I went to stay with a married couple, both of whom were my intimate and very dear friends, and with whom I had had a close association for a considerable part of my life. To my grievous distress I had been there hardly five minutes when I found that they were wrangling and describing one another in terms of abuse. When I pleaded with them for their sake,...

Recruitment to the Civil Service (14 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: It is a floor and not a ceiling.

Recruitment to the Civil Service (14 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Might we have an explanation from the right hon. Gentleman of what that means? Do I understand that that applies to each examination as it comes along, or does it cover the whole field?

Recruitment to the Civil Service (14 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: I think we have had an important discussion to-day, and, when my hon. Friend the Member for Wallsend (Miss Ward) expresses regret that this House has not been filled, I would remind her of two facts. First, some of us, who usually sit on these benches, are to-day in what I might call another place, and, further, the absence from these benches of a large number of hon. Members is due to the...

Recruitment to the Civil Service (14 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: The Financial Secretary agrees, I understand, with the interpretation I have put on these proposals. With regard to the nature of the examinations, when boys and girls come straight from school or young men and young women come from their university, the last two or three years of their life before they come out has been devoted to a certain amount of book knowledge and when you subject them...

Recruitment to the Civil Service (14 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Then to that extent it appears that my fears are justified.

Recruitment to the Civil Service (14 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Taking the figures the right hon. Gentleman has given, who are the 1,000—all the candidates, or all the men who are not ex-Servicemen, or all the women?

Orders of the Day — Burma (12 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: Before the right hon. Gentleman goes on to the next phase, I think it would be useful if he would elucidate the statement he made that this phase will be conducted under the aegis of the military authorities—under the Commander-in-Chief. Do I understand it will be under the United Nations, or under the British Government?

Orders of the Day — Liberated Europe (British Intervention) (8 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: May I respectfully point out to you, Mr. Speaker, that my hon. Friend behind said nothing of the kind. What he was endeavouring to do was to give a picture of opinion. He made no criticism himself. [HON. MEMBERS: "Oh."] He made no criticism himself. He was endeavouring to give a psychological picture. What he said was that there were certain people who took that view.

Greece (Disturbances, Athens) (5 Dec 1944)

Mr Frederick Pethick-Lawrence: While appreciating the great delicacy of the situation, I desire to ask the Prime Minister two questions arising out of his statement. Is he aware of the very grave anxiety felt in all sections in this country with regard to what has taken place, and will he undertake to keep the House informed from time to time in the immediate future so that we may know what the situation is from day to...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.