Results 1–20 of 1239 for speaker:Sir Ian Percival

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements (14 May 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Is my right hon. Friend aware that, however hard the Leader of the Opposition may try, and whatever they are praying for in Moscow in the next few weeks, millions of people in the United Kingdom will be praying that she will be given the health and strength to continue to give the magnificent lead that she has given to us all for eight solid years? Whatever hon. and right hon. Members...

Crown Proceedings (Armed Forces) Bill (24 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am glad to have the opportunity to say a brief word in congratulating and thanking all concerned. I congratulate and thank my hon. Friend the Member for Davyhulme (Mr. Churchill) for promoting that Bill, and the Government for the attitude that they have adopted towards it. I congratulate the House on being, it would seem, about to do something useful, albeit within a limited sphere. I was...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: The right hon. Gentleman will I am sure acknowledge that I faced that matter head on and said that I could not agree to an inconsistent clause. It has to apply throughout the United Kingdom. Is the right hon. Gentleman saying that, for fear of the consequences, we must not have juries? He has overlooked the fact that even if that were true—I do not accept that it is—other suggestions...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Will my right hon. Friend give way?

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am interested that my right hon. Friend and others are making such a meal of this. If there be an ambiguity, it can be put right perfectly easily by the addition of four words. We have another House for that purpose. I would be the first to add those words. That point is no argument against the principle of the Clause.

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: We do in a war.

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: It seems my right hon. Friend has declared war on me.

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am grateful to the right hon. Gentleman for giving way. As I have said, I am a little surprised that such a meal has been made of this. I accepted that one must be consistent. I did not think it was acceptable to have the death penalty here, but not in Northern Ireland. I did not think it was acceptable that we should be prevented by threats from doing what we wanted. I said that special...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I beg to move, That the clause be read a Second time. I start from the premise that every single right hon. and hon. Member is greatly concerned about the level of violence in this country, that we all have an equal concern for the sanctity of life, and that we are all equally conscious of the responsibility that rests on our shoulders for the safety of those whose lives are at risk from...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: That problem is not new. It has always been with us, and it existed when juries tried murder cases when we had the death penalty. The answer is that no one with very strong views either way should sit on the jury if it can be avoided, and judges have ways of indicating this to those who are liable to serve. [Interruption.] I gave way to an old friend, but from now on I shall do my best to...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: No, I will not give way.

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Next, some suggest that one is civilised if one is against the death penalty and uncivilised if one is not. That is a most arrogant assertion. There is no need for the death penalty in a civilised society—but first find a civilised society! To suggest that those of us who support the death penalty are uncivilised is a great impertinence—and very pompous. There is a word for it in Yiddish,...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: It would, of course, have to be applied by means of another provision. I am simply stating frankly that I intend it to apply across the board in an attempt to grasp a nettle about which I know that people feel strongly. Some will say that we cannot execute terrorist killers in Northern Ireland— a part of our own country—for fear of the consequences and that we must therefore reject the...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am coming to that. I must be firmer in resisting the temptation to deal with each intervention as it arises. I will deal with these issues in my own time and in my own way. The House will find that I shall not seek to duck any matter of importance. We are told that we should not use the death penalty because it would create martyrs. I echo the view on this expressed by my right hon. Friend...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am sure, Mr. Speaker, that both you and right hon. and hon. Members will appreciate that the more inverventions of one kind or another that there are, the longer it may take to make the points which I want to put across. I hope that the House will bear that in mind. The hon. Gentleman is quite right. It would be necessary for these provisions, if carried, to be extended. I am merely...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I have already conceded that there are some who will not be deterred by anything. I am talking about those who can be deterred. I do not accept that there are people who cannot be deterred. In respect of those who can be deterred the conclusion to be drawn from my hon. Friend's proposition is in my view the opposite of his. The third point, which is the one that has given me most concern...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am sure that every person who has ever taken part in a trial in which a person's life was at stake must have shared my view and must have taken every conceivable care to see that a mistake was not made. I think that there is great exaggeration about the assertions as to mistakes that have been made. Many of the allegations are I think ill-founded. Nevertheless, I accept that there is a...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: My right hon. and learned Friend, who is an old and valued friend, cannot have been present when I dealt with that point at the start of my speech. If it means what he says— and I am not sure that it does—it can very easily be put right by adding the four words "in either case done". My answer is simple and I am surprised that my right hon. and learned Friend should seek to deal with it...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: If, in fact, it is capable of having the effect that my right hon. and learned Friend said, I would be the first to wish to remedy it by putting in those words. I am asking the House to vote for the principle that has been perfectly adequately summarised by my right hon. and learned Friend. Finally, I want to say a word about the significance of public opinion in these matters. I hold as...

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Both my right hon. Friend and the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton (Mr. Kaufman) missed one point that I made: that special procedures might be necessary.


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