Results 1–20 of 3504 for speaker:Mr Charles Pannell

Patriotism (20 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: Will the Prime Minister, particularly at this time of the year, refrain from lending any cover from his own great office to the idea that the line of patriotism is drawn straight down this Chamber? Will he allow that half of the nation which largely supports the Labour Party is just as likely to stand for this country in peace or war as any of those yappers from the back benches opposite?

Economic Situation (Debate) (17 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: On a point of order. I wonder, Mr. Speaker, whether you will reconsider your earlier statement. I think it is out of character of the Chair that it should issue anything which either stops a Member from asking a question or impedes him, or which might indicate that the Chair has any reservations. The Chair must surely face the debate at the time. With great respect, I wonder whether you, Mr....

Complaint of Privilege (5 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: Thank you very much for your ruling, Mr. Speaker. I know the extreme difficulty you are in when you are commenting on matters arising from a speech made by the Speaker of the other House. That is the difficulty I face. We are dealing with the Speaker of the House of Lords, with the Lord Chancellor. We are really dealing with a judge in his own right. Consequently, the Leader of the House...

Complaint of Privilege (5 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: I am only making a further submission to you, Mr. Speaker. When we ask you to consider a matter for 24 hours, most of us hold our peace. I had no idea what you would say today. But the Lord Chancellor has not held his peace. He went on television again last night. How long will this go on? Since yesterday the matter has been sub judice. A judge of the High Court should have recognised the...

Complaint of Privilege (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: I wish to raise a matter of privilege, or rather of contempt of this House, by the Lord Chancellor. I start from a self-evident basis that you, Mr. Speaker, and you alone, are responsible for the Order Paper. What goes on it is a matter for you, and it is for you to rule a matter out of order if you think it is wrong. It is not for the Lord Chancellor, in another place, drinking and eating at...

Complaint of Privilege (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: If the hon. Gentleman who called out "Humbug" will rise in his place, Mr. Speaker will no doubt call him to order.

Complaint of Privilege (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: I cannot give way for the submission of a point of order. I shall be glad to see, Mr. Speaker, that you have the benefit of the statement and the copy of The Times which has given the speech full-length treatment, to say nothing of the lesser newspapers, so that you will be able so to rule.

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: I join with other hon. Members in saying how glad we are to see the right hon. Gentleman the Secretary of State for Employment back in the House. However, I do not know whether he is glad to be here in his new capacity, but at least we can say that he brings a fresh mind to bear on this subject. I intend to get down to issues so that he can address his mind to the subject of this debate. The...

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: My answer is that they had a flat duty to find out. They might have impounded the union's superannuation fund and put the benefits of aged members at risk.

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: I will not give way to my hon. Friend. I have quite enough to do. I am sure that he will be able to make his speech later. The sequestrators could have found out where the money came from. We cannot accept an infallible, remote judge at the top taking no notice of the consequences of his action. The reference to Con-Mech is worth recalling. The Department of Employment no longer...

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: The answer was given by my right hon. Friend the Member for East Ham, North (Mr. Prentice). The general fund is contributed to by all members of the union. If any punishment is to be inflicted it should be inflicted on the whole of the union. The political fund is made up of contributions by members who have opted to pay into it. Therefore, if the punishment is inflicted on the political...

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: Quite right, too.

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: The hon. and learned Gentleman used the word "unanimously'' There was no unanimity. The court itself does or does not do something. There is no unanimity issue, because the president of the court supervenes.

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: They should have found out.

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: The cheque was endorsed to the political account. The hon. and learned Gentleman is making this case for Sir John Donaldson. He is reading a brief.

Industrial Relations (4 Dec 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: Does the hon. and learned Gentleman defend it?

Business of the House (29 Nov 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: If the right hon. Gentleman cannot find time for the motion on the question of the President of the National Industrial Relations Court, will he represent to the Lord Chancellor that it is undesirable that the president of that court should make proclamations outside the court on matters which might be subject to appeal, in the way that he commented on his findings in the court to a meeting...

Yorkshire and Humberside (23 Nov 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: My hon. Friend has mentioned the question of noise. Earlier in his speech he rather blessed the proposal to extend the Leeds-Bradford airport at Yeadon. He did not, however, mention the extension of the noise nuisance to the people in my constituency who live nearby. Has he a view about that?

Yorkshire and Humberside (23 Nov 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: While looking at statistics in preparation for this debate, I noticed that the waiting list in Leeds, the biggest place in the region, had doubled in the past year. Does not the hon. Gentleman think that that is a useful statistic?

Oral Answers to Questions — Greater London Council (15 Nov 1973)

Mr Charles Pannell: Will the Prime Minister tell the House why he is so touchy about meeting the leader of the GLC? When he found that his progress from here to Downing Street was held up, he was not above contacting Desmond Plummer by means of an expensive telephone call to Tokyo. It seems a very short space to travel to exchange courtesies by the heads of two administrations.


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