Results 61–80 of 239 for speaker:Mr Nigel Nicolson

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: There is another Amendment—

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: Sir Rhys, it is most relevant—

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: Perhaps I might continue with my argument but omit that point. On two other grounds a newspaper can never be a horror comic. If a horror comic is published under the auspices of a newspaper, then the sheet ceases to be a newspaper and becomes a horror comic. Newspapers contain news. [Hon. Members: "Not always."] They never consist wholly or mainly of pictures. Even the "Daily Mirror" does...

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: So-called newspapers published for children could come within the definition of the Bill, because they would certainly be covered by the term "other like work." They are not newspapers in the sense the hon. Member used the word, but in the eyes of a jury they would certainly be covered by the Bill, although they are much closer to the magazine type of publication than to a newspaper, in the...

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I think that it will weary the Committee if I go on disclosing my interest as a publisher. With the permission of the House, I make this third disclosure as the final one for this evening. I do not disagree with the Amendment, or with what the hon. Member for St. Pancras, North (Mr. K. Robinson) said about it, but it will cover only a tiny field. It will cover only those publications which...

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I am sorry to oppose the Amendment, but I do so most strongly. If the Amendment is incorporated in the Bill, it could release a flood of concealed horror and pornography in publications designed for children. Both hon. Members who have spoken have said that one cannot by photography produce some horrific, bestial result as one can by drawings. That is not true. One can, by methods of trick...

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Works to Which This Act Applies.) (24 Mar 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: May I, as a publisher, state my view? My hon. and learned Friend has indicated that he will look at the matter again. [An HON. MEMBER: "Has he?"] He has. I should be perfectly happy to be judged upon the phrase without the words "as a whole." It would give me sufficient safeguards. The word "work" is a generalisation because it does not refer to any specific part of the work. The word "tend"...

Orders of the Day — Children and Young Persons (Harmful Publications) Bill: Clause 3. — (Power to Search for, and Dispose of, Works to Which This Act Applies and Articles for Printing Them.) (4 Apr 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: On behalf of publishers, I should like to say a final word of welcome to the Bill. I was among those who, on Second Reading, criticised the Bill rather heavily for including in its definitions publications which were not particularly harmful. I now think that my criticisms at that time were exaggerated, and that they have been entirely removed by the Amendments which my right hon. and gallant...

Orders of the Day — Children and Young Persons (Harmful Publications) Bill: Clause 3. — (Power to Search for, and Dispose of, Works to Which This Act Applies and Articles for Printing Them.) (4 Apr 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I am the only publisher who has spoken in our debates. I must point out to the hon. Gentleman that in everything I said I tried to strengthen the Bill against the publishers of horror comics, and a few minutes ago I gave it, on behalf of the whole of my profession, the warmest welcome I could because it is directed against something that we want to root out.

Oral Answers to Questions — National Finance: Expenditure (Food) (19 Apr 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: Is there not something rather pathetic about the efforts of the hon. Member for Dartford (Mr. Dodds) to tell the people of this country that they are worse off under Conservatism?

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: Let us imagine that the hon. and learned Gentleman has to intervene in Israel under the Tripartite Declaration in order to protect Israel against an attack from the neighbouring Arab countries. By the terms of our Treaties with the Arab countries, we should not have the use of airfields in Jordan, Iraq and elsewhere in the area. Cyprus is perfectly positioned to enable us to bring quick and...

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: But the hon. and learned Gentleman is arguing that it is ridiculous to have a base of any sort in Cyprus.

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: What about Haifa?

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I agree with the hon. Member for Coventry, East (Mr. Crossman) on two things. First, I agree that this is a matter of urgency. Secondly, I agree that it is something which concerns the Foreign Office as much as the Colonial Office. I am sure that it will not have escaped him that it was the Foreign Office, in the person of the present Minister of Defence, who made our case at the United...

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I am just coming to that. The hon. Member for Coventry, East remarked that it is not very attractive to the Cypriots to be told that we are going to establish airfields in their country from which H-bombers can take off. Would it be any more attractive if the airfields were under Greek supervision?

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: Whether it is a Crown Colony or a province of Greece, an H-bomb falling upon an airfield in the middle of a small country has precisely the same effect, that of obliteration.

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: It will not have escaped the attention of the hon. and learned Gentleman, I am sure, that both Great Britain and Greece are members of the some alliance, which is guarding against the same enemy. We are both members of N.A.T.O., and Russia is our common enemy. The airfields, whosever they are, will have precisely the same purpose. The airfields in Cyprus are totally irrelevant to the question...

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I appreciate the hon. Member's point. I deliberately referred to the Cypriots as Europeans. This brings me to my next point. The Cypriots are hurt because they feel that they are subject to precisely the same form of colonial rule as East or West Africans.

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: I do not want to be too long. It is because the Cypriots are subject to the Colonial Office in London and have as their administrators reasonable and efficient British officials who may have come straight from Africa, Singapore or some other remote Colony, that they feel it to be an indignity to a people who are of European race, are educated, are Greeks if one likes, and have proved that...

Orders of the Day — Cyprus (5 May 1955)

Mr Nigel Nicolson: Malta would be another example of the type of Colony I have in mind, and that is why I want to put this proposition to my right hon. Friend. Could we not in some way devise this intermediate stage, which would not be a humiliating status, but would not confer that full self-government in the sense in which Australia or New Zealand possess it, which carries with it the right to secede from the...


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