Results 121–140 of 402 for speaker:Mr Thomas Naylor

Secret Session. (30 Jul 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: On a point of Order. May I draw attention to the fact that if this discussion as to whether or not there should be a secret or an open Session continues much longer there will be no Session at all?

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Power to provide for trial of offences by special courts in certain areas.) (24 Jul 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: I do not think the suggestion made by my hon. Friend the Member for Ebbw Vale (Mr. Bevan) has been properly understood. I disagree with the hon. and gallant Member opposite when he says that the two proposals now at issue before the Committee are very much the same. It seems to me that they are divided in principle. The Home Secretary's suggestion is connected only with the Royal...

Miscellaneous.: Clause 1. — (Power to provide for trial of offences by special courts in certain areas.) (23 Jul 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: As the Amendment is now drafted, I think there must be some mistake. The word "engaged" should be "shall."

Miscellaneous.: Clause 1. — (Power to provide for trial of offences by special courts in certain areas.) (23 Jul 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: The word "shall" is necessary for the sense of the Clause.

Sittings of the House (Air-Raid Warnings). (11 Jul 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: There is one possibility which has been overlooked, namely, that the bombs may be falling before any warning is given and all the Members who are in this House put out of commission or blown to pieces. What would the procedure be in that case? Would it be in order for anyone who escaped to move to report Progress and ask leave to sit again?

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Supply.: Scrap Metal. (19 Jun 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: asked the Minister of Supply what offer of iron railings he has received from the London Inns of Court?

Oral Answers to Questions — Civil Defence.: Air-Raid Precautions Officers. (6 Jun 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he is aware of the dissatisfaction existing among officers in charge of local air-raid precautions stretcher parties, whose duties involve the control of a large number of men, at receiving no more than the £3 per week paid to the members of the rank and file; and whether, bearing in mind the effect such treatment must have upon...

Oral Answers to Questions — Civil Defence.: Reception Areas, East Coast. (9 May 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: asked the Minister of Health whether, in view of recent happenings on the East coast, he will now remove East and South-East coast towns and villages from the list of reception areas, and arrange for the transfer of the children now in those places to areas less vulnerable to enemy aircraft or other forms of attack?

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Supply.: Wood-Pulp and Paper Production. (9 May 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: asked the Minister of Supply whether, in view of the increasing shortage of paper-making material, and the effect of such shortage on production and employment in the printing, newspaper and paper-making trades, he will take steps to secure a long-term agreement for the maximum amount of supplies of wood-pulp and logs from Canada and Newfoundland to prevent those stocks being absorbed by...

Oral Answers to Questions — Excelsior Philanthropic Society. (2 May 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: Can the right hon. Gentleman explain why an institution of this kind which is not considered sufficiently respectable to be allowed to operate in the provinces, is considered good enough for London?

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (4 Apr 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: I beg to move, in page 8, line 14, at the end, to insert: Provided that if any member of a society dies whilst serving, his next of kin or other representative shall be entitled to any benefit to which they would have been entitled if death had occurred before the cessation of contributions. I do not know whether the Financial Secretary has examined this Amendment, but I think he will agree...

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (4 Apr 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: I have to accept the inevitable.

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (4 Apr 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: I accept the inevitability of a dead man not being able to resume contributions.

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (4 Apr 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: The Financial Secretary will recognise that the Clause with which we are now dealingmakes provision for the suspension of benefits to members until such time as they resume contributions. My point is that a deceased member cannot possibly resume contributions, and that if there is no such Amendment in the Bill a trade union or a friendly society may say that they decline to pay benefit...

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (4 Apr 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: On the understanding that the Financial Secretary will give serious consideration to an Amendment on these lines—I do not insist on the actual words of this Amendment—and on the understanding that I shall take the opportunity of returning to the matter on the Report stage, I beg to ask leave to withdraw the Amendment.

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (20 Mar 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: I find myself largely in agreement with the hon. Member for Gorbals (Mr. Buchanan). I approach this Bill from the point of view of an unofficial member of a friendly society and of a trade union, and I ask myself whether there is anything in the Bill that could not be done by a friendly society or a trade union without any assistance whatever from the State. The Bill proposes to eliminate the...

Orders of the Day — Societies (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (20 Mar 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: It may be next to nothing; and where will the member be? The Bill is based on the assumption that there are going to be great disasters, that large numbers of members will be hurt in the war and that trade unions and friendly societies will not be able to pay the benefits. Experience has shown that it is not persons but property that suffers in air raids, but the member is still under the...

Orders of the Day — Old Age and Widows' Pensions Bill.: Clause 13. — (Temporary provisions as to commencement of supplementary pensions.) (4 Mar 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: I want to ask a question, and I have no doubt the right hon. Gentleman will give me a straight answer. Am I right in assuming that the fixing of the dates in this Clause has no connection with the possibility of a General Election in the autumn?

Orders of the Day — Civil Estimates, Supplementary Estimates, 1939.: Ministry of Labour and National Service. (22 Feb 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: The question which I wish to raise has reference to Item G, a supplementary sum of £200,000 in connection with the contributions payable by the State to the Unemployment Fund. This is a result, the Minister explained, of an improvement in employment, meaning that more employers and more employed were paying contributions, which made it necessary for the Exchequer to be drawn upon to the...

Orders of the Day — Civil Estimates, Supplementary Estimates, 1939.: Ministry of Labour and National Service. (22 Feb 1940)

Mr Thomas Naylor: Am I not entitled, in consequence of that item of £200,000, which means a distinct gain for the Unemployment Insurance Fund, to make are quest to the Minister to reconsider a regulation which would give him the opportunity of reverting to the original number of days' benefit—312 days as against 180? After all, it is a matter of expenditure.


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