Results 81–100 of 4481 for speaker:Mr Robert Mellish

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Before my hon. Friend answers, he also should remember, with regard to the facts of the Canadian dispute, that every longshoreman in Canada is now working; and they should know more about it than the hon. Member for Finsbury (Mr. Platts-Mills.)

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: May I bring to your notice, Mr. Deputy-Speaker, the fact that the hon. Member is alleging that no Member has any facts to repudiate what he is saying. May I point out that I have not yet been called in this Debate and that I have other facts?

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: You were not in the Chair, Sir, when the hon. Member for Finsbury (Mr. Platts-Mills) made his speech, and when he gave the House the benefit of certain facts which he said he had gained. I appealed to the Chair then, pointing out that I was also in possession of facts from the other point of view. Are we to have no chance of putting our points of view?

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: I am grateful for the opportunity of speaking, because I represent a constituency in which some thousands of men are now out on strike. I should like to begin by reminding the House that my father was an 1889 dock worker. He remained a dock worker all his life, took part in the 1912 dispute, to which the hon. Member for Finsbury (Mr. Platts-Mills) has referred, and at the age of 14 he joined...

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: I am not giving way yet. May I say to the hon. Member for West Fife (Mr. Gallacher) that I listened to his speech with interest? While he was talking I felt extremely sorry for the general secretary of the National Stevedores' Union, because, while the hon. Member was urging that these men should be supported in this lock-out and dispute and so on, the general secretary of the "Blue Union,"...

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: This is gross misrepresentation—[Interruption]

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: This is gross misrepresentation because when the men got back to Canada they would automatically be signed off.

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: That may be so, but the point they had in mind, and I accept the argument, was that they wanted to be sure that there would be no victimisation in Canada. It is in the log. I beg hon. Members to believe me; if they do not believe me, they can see it for themselves. It says: I am authorised to state that the owners undertake to prefer no charge against any of the undermentioned in respect of...

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: I thank my hon. Friend; that is a fair point. The answer, I understand, is that the Canadian strikers said there is no guarantee that they will not be prosecuted when they get back to Canada.

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: They said there was no guarantee—that is one thing. I was intending to come to that point later, because I want to deal with the evidence we got from the crew, and I will relate the whole story to the hon. Member for Nelson and Colne, if he will allow me. After we had heard from the captain of the ship, I asked to see the crew. My trade union training has taught me not to believe that what...

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks: Emergency Powers (Proclamation) (13 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Surely the most important people to judge whether a ship is "black" or not are the Canadian dock workers; they have said it is not "black," because they have loaded it.

Oral Answers to Questions — Metropolitan Police (Pensions) (14 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give the number of men now serving in the Metropolitan Police Force who joined the Force between 1st July, 1919, and 31st December, 1919, during 1920, and from 1st January to 28th August, 1921, respectively; and the numbers of these men who have now reached 55 years of age and will be retired under the age-limit rule with their...

Oral Answers to Questions — Metropolitan Police (Pensions) (14 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Is my right hon. Friend aware that, on the figures he has given, it would appear that in the Metropolitan area there are approximately 147 men who have done 30 years' service, but who, by virtue of the fact that they are not 55 years of age, in order to get the maximum pension, have to serve another three years? In the light of the fact that there are only 147 and that there is some...

Oral Answers to Questions — Metropolitan Police (Pensions) (14 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Would my right hon. Friend look at the matter again if the figures for the whole country prove to be quite small, because there is a hardship here, and there was a contract for 30 years' service only?

Strike, London Docks (21 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Is my right hon. Friend aware that the vast bulk of the men want to go back to work but that they are scared that a small minority will accuse them of being blacklegs? Is it not terribly important for a message to be given to these men to go to Victoria Park tomorrow and vote emphatically that they will go back to work? The self-styled lock-out committee are endeavouring to find a face-saving...

Strike, London Docks (21 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Can the Home Secretary please give the House any information as to when we are likely to receive the report which I know has been promised, and which my right hon. Friend the Minister of Labour has promised, in respect of the proof which the dock worker wants to see, and will deal with once he has the proof, of the elements which have caused the dispute? It is the proof that they are crying...

Strike, London Docks (21 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: We have.

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks (26 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: Would not the right hon. Gentleman agree that the Government had to bear in mind that there were 11,000 dockers still at work and that the suggestion of the Dock Labour Board, appointed without any consultation or authority, might have had the consequence of involving many of those people who were still loyally carrying out their jobs? Was it not opportune that the Government should say that...

Orders of the Day — Strike, London Docks (26 Jul 1949)

Mr Robert Mellish: In view of the position he holds as Chairman of the Port of London Authority, will the right hon. Gentleman clear up this point, which is very important? He talks about the unofficial strike leaders, but I hope he does not mean those people, ordinary dock workers, who were acting in an unofficial capacity and who were duped just as much as anyone. I hope that when the right hon. Gentleman...


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