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Results 21–40 of 2959 for speaker:Mr Niall MacDermot

Orders of the Day — Planning Blight and Worsenment Bill (27 Feb 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: What were the other factors to which the hon. Gentleman alluded but did not specify? One knows that many small shopkeepers in high streets are gravely affected by the introduction of large supermarkets and so on?

Orders of the Day — Planning Blight and Worsenment Bill (27 Feb 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: If the hon. Gentleman is right in his argument, those customers must be going somewhere else. Therefore, someone else's business has profited to the same extent as those other businesses have suffered. Why shoud the community, and not those who have gained a profit, have to pay for those who have suffered a loss?

Local Government, England (Reform) (18 Feb 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: As I shall have a number of critical things to say about the White Paper and some of the Redcliffe-Maud proposals on which they are based, I begin by paying tribute to the courage of the Government, first of all, in setting up the Royal Commission at all. They grasped a nettle which had been avoided by previous Administrations for years. Everyone has known that reform, and radical reform, of...

Local Government, England (Reform) (18 Feb 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: I hope my hon. Friend will forgive me if I do not give way. I would rather not, since so many hon. Members wish to speak. When I joined the Army, on the first day I was issued with a uniform. I complained to the quarter-master sergeant that it did not fit very well and received the reply, "In the Army we do not make uniforms to fit the man; we make the man to fit the uniform". My complaint...

Concorde Aircraft (Test Routes) (17 Feb 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: Is it intended to measure the sound effects of the tests—not the subjective reactions of people to the sound, but how much actual noise is being made over what area? Can my right hon. Friend confirm that there will be, without much further delay, a proper study of the subjective reaction to Concorde's sound before any decisions are taken?

Local Government Reform in England (4 Feb 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: In welcoming my right hon. Friend's proposals, may I put two questions to him? First, what considerations led the Government not to recommend extending the metropolitan area principle to the Derby, Derbyshire, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire sub-region, which is growing almost as fast as the others which he has mentioned? Secondly, while welcoming what he said about the local councils, can be...

Orders of the Day — Right of Privacy Bill (23 Jan 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: Would my hon. Friend say why she thinks that there is anything in the Bill which would inhibit the Press in carrying out what she describes as the good type of investigation?

Orders of the Day — Right of Privacy Bill (23 Jan 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: Let the Bill go into Committee.

Orders of the Day — Right of Privacy Bill (23 Jan 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: May I raise one other point and put a specific question to my right hon. Friend? The "Justice" report advocates a simple remedy, and it argues the need for further criminal remedies. It also argues the need for separate legislation about data banks and computers. If the committee takes the view that several different pieces of legislation are required, will my right hon. Friend also bear in...

Orders of the Day — Right of Privacy Bill (23 Jan 1970)

Mr Niall MacDermot: I have been asked by my hon. Friend the Member for Birmingham, All Saints (Mr. Walden) to seek to reply to some of the points which have been raised. In that circumstance, I may not sound altogether impartial when I add my tribute to those which other hon. Members have already offered on his opening speech. Those of us who were privileged to hear it will, I think, treasure it as one of the...

Parliamentary Papers (Supply) (17 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: Is my right hon. Friend aware that those of us who have some knowledge of the difficulties with which the Stationery Office has had to contend over a period of 10 or more years —difficulties of which the right hon. Member for Barnet (Mr. Maudling) is well aware—will consider that this occasion perhaps calls for some degree of forbearance on the part of the House?

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: Mr. Niall MacDermot (Derby, North) rose—

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: Mr. MacDermot rose—

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: The choice before the House tonight is whether we should abolish capital punishment for murder, or go back to the earlier Act. [HON. MEMBERS: "No."] Hon. Members say, "No", and the right hon. and learned Member for St. Marylebone (Mr. Hogg) began his speech by trying to dismiss the 1957 Act as something which no one could defend and which we would not return to, but, in fact, that will...

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: If the hon. Gentleman is realistic, he will realise that if a man has committed two murders no Home Secretary is likely to release him after the second murder. What the retentionists have not shown is how they would propose to revise the Butler Act to do better the job which the Butler Act was supposed to do. Another aspect of the same argument put forward by the right hon. and learned...

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: —if he is caught, and is caught with firearms on him. The hon. Gentleman says "No", but I see every lawyer in the House nodding assent with me. Every lawyer knows that the mere possession of firearms will at once probably double the sentence.

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: The hon. Gentleman has shown that he is incapable of following an argument. [HON. MEMBERS: "No."] I shall come to the point the hon. Gentleman has made, but he is not following my argument. It is not right to say that there is a premium on murder. By the mere fact of carrying a firearm a criminal at once runs a very much greater risk.

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: If the criminal were to use, or to attempt to use, the firearm, as my learned Friend says his sentence would be much more than doubled; so he is running a very great risk indeed. Other hon. Members speak from their own experience, but it is not within my experience that the effect of abolition has been that the old lag type has taken to using firearms where he would not have done so before....

Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) (16 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: I did not say "young amateur criminals". I said "young professional criminals". The right hon. and learned Gentleman misheard me. I think he will agree that the type of offences of which he spoke is committed almost entirely by young criminals and not by the "old lag" type of professional criminal. What has not been proved, and it is the crux of the argument, is that the increase in the...

Control of Advertisements (10 Dec 1969)

Mr Niall MacDermot: The owner would have to get planning permission for the window first.


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