Results 161–180 of 8610 for speaker:Sir Keith Joseph

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The teachers are men and women given by God free will, and it is their decision to disrupt children's education. There is no question of having to do that.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The behaviour of teachers is not such as to recommend the Government to consider a review body. Moreover, it is perfectly possible for the employers and teachers to agree on pay that rewards good teachers, recruits and retains people of the right quality, and which is affordable.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: If the hon. Gentleman has suggestions that would be affordable, would achieve the Government's purposes, and would end the disruption, I would gladly listen to them or read them. Of the options available to the Government, I believe that the right one is to persuade the teachers to do their duty by the children and to finish the disruption now.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I would not be surprised if that were true, and I am sure that the gentleman concerned remains self-righteous despite it.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The employers also asked for an inquiry and the Government considered such ideas, but there is no reason to expect that an inquiry would automatically end the current disruption. I hope that the hon. Gentleman tries to bring the same persuasive power to bear on the teachers as he does on the Government.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: On 11 December the management panel restated its view that a Royal Commission or some other kind of inquiry should be established to look into teachers' pay, structure, conditions of service and negotiating machinery. Naturally I will give careful consideration to that request, but I have to say that it is difficult to see how such action would produce an early resolution of the present...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: It is not self-evident that such an inquiry would bring to an end the present disruption. Discussions are taking place this afternoon between the employers and the teachers' representatives. I do not want to pin too much hope on what might emerge from the discussions this afternoon, but I repeat that an inquiry would not necessarily end the disruption.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: No, indeed not. I do not for a moment believe that my modest suggestion, which is agreed in principle by so many teachers as well as by so many members of the public, has any part to play in this dispute.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: Most certainly yes. One of the advantages of the offer that the employers made on 12 September, with the help of conditional additional money from the taxpayers, was precisely that it would have enabled employers to offer relatively attractive salaries to teachers who are in short supply.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: It is an indication of the irrationality of some of the unions involved in the dispute that makes the right hon. Gentleman accept the possibility that even an inquiry would not bring to an end the destructive damage that is being caused by the dispute to the education of children. It is often in the minds of hon. Members on both sides of the House that, if introduced, an inquiry would end the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: My hon. Friend makes very sensible suggestions, but they are, alas, for the trade unions and the teachers concerned, not for the Government.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Pay Dispute (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: For the umpteenth time—because I do not believe that it would fulfil the hopes of many hon. Members, and of many outside the House, who imagine that the teacher unions would then behave reasonably.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teacher Appraisal (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I should like to see teacher appraisal conducted at the level of the individual school by the teachers themselves, in accordance with general arrangements introduced and monitored by local education authorities.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teacher Appraisal (17 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I do not agree with everything that Mr. Jarvis does or says, but I am informed that there is a good deal of unanimity of opinion between Mr. Jarvis and his union and the Government on the matter of appraisal.

Orders of the Day — Education (Amendment) Bill (5 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I beg to move, That the Bill be now read a Second time. Two years ago I introduced to the House a Bill to empower the holder of my office and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales to pay specific grants, known as education support grants, to local education authorities. That Bill became the Education (Grants and Awards) Act 1984, and gave my right hon. Friend and me power to...

Orders of the Day — Education (Amendment) Bill (5 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The regulations were amended by the then Government. However, it is not for the hon. Gentleman or for the holder of my office to pronounce on what a court would find was implied by the contract between a local education authority and a teacher. That matter is for a court to decide if an employer wishes to test the case. I simply state that the regulations were amended in 1968. Our principal...

Orders of the Day — Education (Amendment) Bill (5 Dec 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I respect the view of my hon. Friend's constituent. It will be for teachers to choose to do so if the local education authority wishes to offer them the opportunity to become paid supervisors of the midday period. We do not intend to prescribe the details of new arrangements beyond what I have said. Individual authorities are best placed to determine matters such as staffing numbers and...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Dispute (19 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: A series of offers have been made to the teacher unions. The package of reforms and pay improvements offered in the Burham committee on 12 September had the Government's endorsement and represented a basis for a worthwhile settlement, beneficial to teachers and pupils alike. All offers have been rejected by the unions even as a basis for further negotiations. The reconstituted teachers' panel...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Dispute (19 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: It is not I who brought about the ending of the NUT majority on the Burnham teachers' panel. It was brought about by the individual decision of thousands of teachers who, of their own free will, left membership of the NUT. It is not the Government who have failed to act in the dispute. We have made a substantial, though conditional, offer. It is the teacher unions which have consistently...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education and Science: Teachers' Dispute (19 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I agree with my hon. Friend. The teachers' unions seem to be putting children absolutely last in their considerations.


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