Results 341–360 of 8610 for speaker:Sir Keith Joseph

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The Government do not have any money. We already try to put taxpayers' money to the best use, and this debate is a valuable help in that process. The right hon. Member for Clydeside (Dame J. Hart) asked the key question. We would all like more money for science, but where is it to come from? My hon. Friend the Member for Wantage (Mr. Jackson), in an excellent speech, and the hon. Member for...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I must emphasise that, of the approximately £2 billion classified as defence research and development, only about 15 per cent. goes to research. Opposition Members referred to the United States President's increase of civil research by 30 per cent., but they did not allow for inflation. That was the nominal increase. The increase in real terms was 15 per cent.

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I shall not give way because I am right.

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I do not have that. I am referring to general civil research. I am glad to say that my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence has in mind two schemes which would increase collaboration with academic institutions in strategic research. The introduction of those schemes is likely to increase MOD expenditure in higher education. I do not pretend for one moment that that will solve...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I know only too sadly I shall send my hon. Friend a copy of my 21 May letter so that he may see the new possibilities The hon. Member for Stockton, South (Mr. Wrigglesworth) based his judgment that all is not well with science on a familiar report which was based largely on citations We live in a world that has been transformed from the days when we were pioneers in science—and we have to...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I do not think that the hon. Gentleman can justify the word "fiasco" It may have been a very unpleasant experience for me, but it resulted in the transfer of £55 million to basic science.

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I accept that what I originally asked for and had to reduce by 20 per cent. was probably too rapid and abrupt a change, but the people to whom the hon. Gentleman refers accepted a £55 million switch from their resources to basic science.

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: Today I shall concentrate on the utilitarian aspects of civil science. However, I first recognise and pay tribute to the noble function of scientific research in expanding our understanding of the world in which we live and, indeed, our understanding of the universe. I also realise the excitement, slog, frustration and satisfaction that those who devote their lives to scientific research...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I shall certainly inform myself, and write to the hon. Gentleman However, the research councils are treated as autonomous bodies that make their own decisions as to how to spend the taxpayers' money which I, under advice, distribute to them Subject to that, I shall look into the matter and write to the hon. Gentleman One of the themes which the Advisory Board for the Research Councils...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I well remember that in the 1950s we asked a civil servant—I cannot remember his name; I think it was C. P. Snow, was it not?

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: Indeed it was. We asked them to try to persuade British scientists to return, and that had some success. I do not know whether the current position demands similar action or how effective it would be. However, I note my hon. Friend's comments. It is well known that this country's track record in exploiting the commercial potential of our scientists' inventions has been poor. A number of...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I certainly acknowledge the problem, but to some extent it has been mitigated by the Government's new blood scheme, which has been welcomed by the universities. I note that the number of appointments that they would like to make significantly, though not dramatically, exceeds the number of vacancies that they expect during the equivalent time. I acknowledge the hon. Gentleman's valid point....

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I can best answer the hon. Gentleman by referring to the leading article in Nature of 13 June, in which a more balanced picture is given It gives credit to the Government for what they have done and makes relatively constructive suggestions about what the Government should do Therefore, I refer the hon. Gentleman to the current Nature leader. Despite that recent financial reinforcement, the...

Prayers: Government's Policy for Science (14 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I have no doubt that that and other points of view will emerge clearly, whatever is in the report. Science and scientists make an essential contribution to society— to its material prosperity, its comforts and convenience, and to the general well-being and health of the community. Their work can and does have far-reaching consequences for society. Scientific and technological advance is...

Oral Answers to Questions — Opposition Day: Higher Education (4 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I shall try to answer as many questions as I can in the time available. The hon. Member for Cambridgeshire, North-East (Mr. Freud), in a not altogether friendly discussion on the Green Paper, pointed out that the universities would like to be able to engage at least 900 more lecturers and senior staff during the next period. He was right. However, I must tell the House that during the same...

Oral Answers to Questions — Opposition Day: Higher Education (4 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: Not only will it, but during 1983–84 the universities raised an extra £54 million in that way. This is not a total answer, but it shows what can be done. The Opposition are still hooked on the old 1960s fallacy that more means better, but more does not necessarily mean better. That is why it is essential that, if more is spent, it should be accompanied by the policies to make sure that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Opposition Day: Higher Education (4 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: indicated assent.

Oral Answers to Questions — Opposition Day: Higher Education (4 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I wish to clarify that point before it becomes widely spread and misunderstood. The Government's proposal to legislate to remove tenure is for future contracts, not for those whose contracts already give them tenure.

Oral Answers to Questions — Opposition Day: Higher Education (4 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I beg to move, to leave out from "House" to the end of the Question and to add instead thereof: congratulates Her Majesty's Government on its policies for ensuring that higher education is better managed and more attuned to the needs of the economy, for maintaining and enhancing standards, and for broadening the criteria for access to higher education; urges Her Majesty's Government to...

Oral Answers to Questions — Opposition Day: Higher Education (4 Jun 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: If it be elitist, I am one who wishes to see thoroughly well trained surgeons, thoroughly well trained engineers and thoroughly developed intellects among those who take decisions on our citizens. I do not suggest that all those qualities can be secured only by those who have higher education. However, we can judge the higher education available by the possession of those qualities. I do not...


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