Results 201–220 of 8610 for speaker:Sir Keith Joseph

Orders of the Day — Social Security and Education (11 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I am sure that the hon. Gentleman would benefit greatly from reading the great books of Adam Smith—"The Theory of the Moral Sentiments" as well as "The Wealth of Nations". Today's debate has benefited from a number of speeches not on the main subject to which I am replying. I pay tribute to the force and sincerity of the contributions of my hon. Friend the Member for Broxtowe (Mr. Lester)...

Orders of the Day — Social Security and Education (11 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: No. I will not give way again. I acknowledge that HMI reports often show, after full inspections, that some teaching—not only science teaching—is too didactic. The Government intend to increase in-service training to help teachers to improve their performance where necessary, but the constant cry of Her Majesty's inspectors, throughout almost all their reports, goes far wider. They say...

Orders of the Day — Social Security and Education (11 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I shall not give way. Yet the conditional offer made available by the Government has enabled the employers to provide for 70,000 or more extra promotions. One in five classroom teachers can expect promotion if that offer is accepted on the conditions that have been proposed. The offer is based not on the even sharing of the money among all teachers but differentially, to award effective...

Orders of the Day — Social Security and Education (11 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I do not quarrel with the hon. Gentleman about teachers' pay in West Germany; I quarrel with his comment that the West German standard of living is about the same as ours. Their prosperity and their productivity, which leads to prosperity, is greater than ours. Therefore, the pay in every sector of German society is substantially above British pay.

Orders of the Day — Social Security and Education (11 Nov 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I want to make it clear that I certainly was not smiling. I am very sad to hear the hon. Member repeating the same errors time and time again. Mixed up with his errors are some truths. I only wish I could convey to him some of the errors he is making, though I acknowledge some of the grievance that he reflects.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: With permission, Mr. Speaker, I should like to make a statement about the teachers' dispute in England and Wales. Intense efforts have been made in recent months by the Government to bring this damaging dispute to a satisfactory conclusion. I regret to say that they have, so far, been unsuccessful. Some of the teacher unions have chosen to continue to disrupt the education of the pupils in...

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Gentleman rightly gave his teachers his advice to accept the offer on the table and to stop the disruption, as did my right hon. and learned Friend the Member for Warrington, South (Mr. Carlisle), who was my predecessor in this office. Regarding the idea of an inquiry, as far as I know the teachers rejected it out of hand.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I accept that a substantial number of teachers are not willing to disrupt education and are not doing so, but I must ask my right hon. and learned Friend whether he thinks that the behaviour of the majority of teachers is such as to make my right hon. Friends in government look kindly on the idea of a review body, especially as the majority of nurses, for instance, will not neglect the...

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: Yes, I am so satisfied, though I always consider on its merits any complaint put to me. On the substance of the hon. Gentleman's question, I must remind him that successive authorities from Lord Houghton onwards, including successive Governments and employers, have said that we shall not get better schools until teachers accept explicitly the conditions of service.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: But my understanding is that the employers have been to ACAS, and I think that ACAS has seen representatives of the teacher unions, so far in vain.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I regret that the growing of a beard does not seem to have changed the hon. Gentleman's attitude. In fact, the Government have put, on condition. a very large sum of extra money on the table.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I think that very large numbers of teachers, including some who are disrupting, must be very, very sad indeed at the damage that they are causing to pupils. Let there be no doubt that the disrupting of children's education is the fault of some teacher unions and their members.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I hope that the hon. Gentleman agrees with his hon. Friend the Member for Durham, North (Mr. Radice) that the teachers should have accepted the offer and ended the disruption.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I am grateful to my hon. Friend. I have no brand-new advice, but I remind the House that unless the teachers' unions accept that they should be bound by the conditions that have been absolutely normal for generations of teachers we shall not have the best schools that we want for all our children.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The Government have provided—on condition—£1,250 million extra money which the teachers' unions, led by the NUT, rejected after 20 minutes. After all, the disruption is being caused by some teacher unions. Do let the House remember that. It is they who are refusing to sit down and discuss.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: My hon. Friend is on to the legitimate point made by teachers, that the money being made available by the Government is that which is available for spending by local education authorities and which would be subject to a contribution by the taxpayer at the level decided for the year concerned for the taxpayer's contribution to the rate support grant. To that extent it is the same as any other...

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Gentleman forgets that the Government have put forward a very large sum of extra money, admittedly on condition, in order to achieve that which successive Governments and Lord Houghton wanted — explicit conditions accepted by teachers. Surely that is an initiative which should not be dismissed and yet the hon. Gentleman did not even accept it as an initiative.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: That is a difficult question to answer. The parents of the children who are suffering now are being asked — I hope for not much longer — to endure damage in order to improve education for all children, including their own, in the future if the employers, with the help of the Government, can reach the desired bargain. That is not much comfort to the parents of children who are on the verge...

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I am surprised that the hon. Gentleman should take that line. In December 1984 the NUT walked out of discussions and in this last month, by a majority over the other teacher unions, the NUT ended any possibility of negotiations.

Teachers' Dispute (England and Wales) (22 Oct 1985)

Sir Keith Joseph: I have come to think that most teachers now recognise the offer. I think that most teachers are apt to compare the offer with the rewards available to some, but not all, teachers if they moved to business and lived a life with many more risks than are attached to the award which they might receive.


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