Results 141–160 of 8610 for speaker:Sir Keith Joseph

Orders of the Day — Supply (7 Jul 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: Like the hon. Gentleman the Member for Bedwellty (Mr. Finch), I want to use the occasion of this anniversary to congratulate all those concerned in the National Insurance scheme, both for creating and administering it, and the civil servants who carry out its functions throughout the country. Like the hon. Gentleman, I also want to use the occasion to take a critical look at its present...

Orders of the Day — Supply (7 Jul 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: I shall be coming to that. It is one of the central themes of what I want to say. I would say, in passing, that many elderly people without the help of their families to advise them do not always know about the provisions that a benevolent State, a benevolent local authority and benevolent voluntary societies could make available to them if only they knew about them. All the surveys which...

Orders of the Day — Supply (7 Jul 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: It is the hon. Gentleman himself who is confused. I was taking up his criticism of my right hon. Friend for my right hon. Friend's action in obtaining 1s. 3d. a week from new entrants towards the pension of those who are at present retired. The hon. Gentleman was saying that this was a gross departure from the insurance principle and yet he himself has departed far further from the insurance...

Orders of the Day — Supply (7 Jul 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Member fails to recognise that I am criticising him not for doing that, but for maintaining that his is an insurance scheme. It is not; it is a scheme of taxation and redistribution. That may be all right, but on page 24 of his pamphlet he maintains that it is an insurance scheme. I was going to say that opting out may be restricted because of the ruin it could bring to the scheme,...

Orders of the Day — Supply (7 Jul 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The right hon. Gentleman would be quite right if the contributions of the higher than average wage earners were not used in the scheme to subsidise the benefits of the lower than average wage earners. He would be right if the contributions of the higher than average wage earners were to be used solely for their own benefit, but they will not be. I submit that occupational pension schemes...

Orders of the Day — Family Allowances and National Insurance Bill (28 Nov 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: I beg to second the Motion. I should like to start by paying tribute to my hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Mr. Denzil Freeth), the able and energetic Member to whom the Economist referred, for introducing this useful piece of legislation. Hon. Members who are lucky enough in the Ballot become for a short period of days the centre of enormous pressure from the panacea mongers and the...

Orders of the Day — National Insurance Bill (27 Jan 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Whereas the right hon. Gentleman has quoted exactly Mr. Jackson's views, would he not agree that, later in the conference at which Mr. Jackson spoke, some equal experts strongly disagreed with him that this was either necessary or practicable?

Orders of the Day — National Insurance Bill (27 Jan 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Would the hon. Member give the figures for the man who enters at the age of 50?

Orders of the Day — National Insurance Bill (27 Jan 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: I think the country as a whole has much for which to thank the Members of the Opposition who have brought out so plainly in their work and speeches the difference in philosophy between the two parties on this most important matter. I have an embarrassing choice because there have been so many things I have heard today with which I disagree that I cannot possibly cope properly with them all....

Orders of the Day — National Insurance Bill (27 Jan 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Could the hon. Gentleman explain what he means by redistri- bution? I do not quite understand what he is saying.

Orders of the Day — National Insurance Bill (27 Jan 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Their own basic pension—not everybody else's.

Fuel and Power (Policy) (6 Feb 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Sir Keith Joseph (Leeds, North-East) rose—

Fuel and Power (Policy) (6 Feb 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Member for Wigan (Mr. Fitch) has made a most vigorous and interesting speech. He has unusual knowledge both of cotton and coal, and that is interesting, because miners use nylon and cotton workers use oil and both want to stop their own obsolescence, but each enjoys the fruits of processes which displace the other. It seems to me that the processes of change cannot be checked, and we...

Fuel and Power (Policy) (6 Feb 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Surely, the whole burden of the argument of the hon. Gentleman's colleagues is that the present pattern of production is to be petrified or ossified. The hon. Gentleman's colleagues do not accept the need for change. I would agree with him that change is to be anticipated where possible, but it cannot be prevented. There is a conflict between producer and consumer. The producer wants the...

Fuel and Power (Policy) (6 Feb 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: I did say that I was riot criticising the unions. I was asking why, in a period in which the unions had negotiated substantial wage increases, they had not—or it may be that they have—organised, fringe benefits, such as compensation for redundancy if it should occur, instead of those wage increases.

Employment (Older Men and Women) (6 Mar 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: I, too, wish to congratulate my hon. and gallant Friend the Member for Dorset, North (Colonel R. H. Glyn) on his choice of this subject when he was lucky enough to win the Ballot. What I cannot quite understand is why so many hon. and right hon. Members opposite should think my hon. and gallant Friend's choice of subject so unimportant that they have not even taken the trouble to attend, let...

Employment (Older Men and Women) (6 Mar 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: May I finish the sentence? Is it their belief that the welfare of a growing proportion of the population, which already numbers 7 million of our fellow citizens and which in 25 years' time will number 10 million, is so trivial a matter that they do not trouble to intervene at all in the debate, and does that account for the fact that for half an hour there was not one hon. Member on the...

Employment (Older Men and Women) (6 Mar 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: The right hon. Gentleman has shown himself to be considerably wounded by the truth. The fact is that there were no hon. Members opposite for half an hour. I am willing to concede that on Fridays there are other calls on hon. Members, and I wish to ask the indulgence of the House, if I have to leave before my hon. Friend replies to the debate, owing to an engagement in the North of England.

Employment (Older Men and Women) (6 Mar 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: Perhaps I ought to say that the quality of those hon. Members attending on both sides of the House makes up for their lack of quantity. However, I am glad to see that the right hon. Member for Blyth (Mr. Robens), who takes such a sincere interest in this problem, is present. This theme is one of such vast canvas that it is impossible to cope with everything one wants to say. There are two...

Employment (Older Men and Women) (6 Mar 1959)

Sir Keith Joseph: I did not intend the hon. Member any discourtesy.


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