Results 101–120 of 8610 for speaker:Sir Keith Joseph

Estimates (Vote on Account) (18 Feb 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: If the expanding services and the cost of the National Health Service make necessary a further financial contribution, will not most people judge that it is far fairer that those who are of working age and well should bear the burden rather than those who are ill or retired?

National Health Service Contributions (25 Feb 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: I have enjoyed listening to both of the speeches that have set off this debate. I wish particularly to say what a pleasure it was to me to listen to my hon. and learned Friend the Financial Secretary stressing for once the benefits, instead of the costs, of the Health Service. To the list of extra amenities that he said our citizens now enjoy, I should like to add extra district nurses, more...

National Health Service Contributions (25 Feb 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The right hon. Gentleman has answered his hon. Friend very effectively. It was the hon. Lady who suggested the idea of a social service budget put forward by the Observer. Personally, I do not think that it would carry us a step forward. I do not think that it would increase incentives or produce a penny more, but there are elements in the graded contributions that share some of the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Hospitals: Patients (3 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: asked the Minister of Health whether the number of patients treated per bed at the non-teaching hospitals increased or decreased between 1955 and 1956; and by how much.

Oral Answers to Questions — Hospitals: Patients (3 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: Does not my right hon. and learned Friend agree that these increases reflect the greatest credit upon both the administrative and the medical staff involved?

Oral Answers to Questions — Hospitals: Organisation and Methods Service (3 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: asked the Minister of Health how many staff are engaged in the Hospital Organisation and Methods Service; what assignments are at present being undertaken by it; and whether he can yet announce how much he proposes to extend this service.

Oral Answers to Questions — Hospitals: Organisation and Methods Service (3 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: Without exaggerating the virtues of this technique, does not my right hon. and learned Friend feel that a staff of nine is grossly inadequate when put to use in such a vast organisation employing almost the third largest man-power force of the whole country; and when he comes to consider what he proposes to do, will he bear in mind that much benefit could be gained by circulating the results...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Health: Under-Doctored Areas (3 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: asked the Minister of Health the number of doctors practising in under-doctored areas; and the number of patients in these areas in 1952 and 1957.

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (5 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The right hon. Lady is being scrupulously fair. She should not import National Insurance elements into her comments at this stage.

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (5 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Gentleman is pursuing an interesting subject with expertness. When he says that if there were a graduated contribution, may I ask whether, in his opinion, it should take into account the family situation in order to be parallel with P.A.Y.E., or does he prefer a flat rate though graduated—if he understands what I mean?

Orders of the Day — National Health Service, England and Wales (17 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Gentleman might also bring out the interesting point that often where prescription unit cost is cheapest the number of visits to the doctor are most frequent.

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: If what the right hon. Gentleman is saying is true, why is it that the Socialist Administration did not start any new hospital buildings? Can it be simply that they were dealing with wartime arrears of maintenance, which would be a reasonable answer? The right hon. Gentleman has to face the fact that there is now a very large new hospital building programme as well as the ordinary...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: Is the hon. Gentleman maintaining that higher wages, which he himself proclaims, and lower unemployment do not justify a higher contribution?

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: We have heard a most interesting speech, based on his personal experience, by the hon. Member for Barking (Mr. Hastings). I shall always agree with him that there comes a point at which money available for the needs of nutrition can be dangerously little, but I would remind the hon. Gentleman that, as he said, the circumstances of today are remarkably different from those of the times of...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The expert who has just intervened knows very well that, numerically and financially, the benefits to the wage-earning section of the community can be counted in their hundreds of millions whereas the very belated remission of tax to the higher earners has not amounted to more than two or three score million pounds at most. I am not frightened of the hon. Gentleman's argument. I maintain and...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Member will remember that as and when the food subsidies were reduced, pensions and other payments to similar people were increased. The hon. Member will not need reminding that food surveys have shown that throughout the years the pensioner has maintained, or even substantially improved upon, his standard of living at the time to which the hon. Member referred. I agree with my hon....

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: Indeed there were. There has never been a specific sum attached to the Service, but a part of the contribution was dealt with separately, administratively, and was known as the Health Service contribution from the beginning. It fell to this Government to make it not allowable for tax, and therefore a more progressive burden.

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: Snap! That is exactly what I said. Under the administration of the Socialist Governments both health and superannuation payments, were allowable against tax, so that a person paying Surtax paid it out of gross and not net income. Does the hon. Member deny that?

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: The hon. Member has certainly succeeded in muddling me. I hope that my right hon. Friend will arbitrate between us. It was my understanding that the Conservative Government ceased to allow the National Health Service contribution element to be allowable against tax in the hands of the normal taxpayer, thus making this contribution payable from net and not from gross income. I leave it to my...

Orders of the Day — National Health Service Contributions Bill (24 Mar 1958)

Sir Keith Joseph: I beg the right hon. Gentleman's pardon—a proportion. He also argued that we should not be content with this but should put aside 4 per cent. or 4½ per cent. of the gross national product. The half per cent. which he allows himself as a discretion is a very large sum; it amounts to £80 million. He therefore gives himself an opportunity to beat the Government if they are within £80...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.