Results 1–20 of 10507 for speaker:Sir Harry Hylton-Foster

Oral Answers to Questions — International Nuclear Force (Asia) (5 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. The invitation to ask a supplementary question is an invitation to ask one question.

Port Transport Industry (Report) (5 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: I do not think that that raises a point of order, but I should like to take the opportunity of pointing out that all I am allowed to allow on a statement is the asking of a few questions. It is very difficult to fit in many questions by back bench Members if Front Bench Members ask all the questions. I wish not to reprove, but to invite indulgence.

Port Transport Industry (Report) (5 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: I was about to conclude this matter and to make some observations on those lines myself. Without further comment, I leave the matter to the right hon. Gentleman. Perhaps I might say that I shall have to ask my fellow Members, to whom I have thought fit to allot time for Adjournment debates, to impact their speeches as much as they can so that we do not squeeze out others.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Aviation: London Airport (Aircraft Movements) (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. I do not think that that arises on this Question.

Defence Review (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: I have received no such request.

Defence Review (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: That does not give rise to a point of order.

Defence Review (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: The point is this. The word "contempt" has a magic and technical meaning. Should the hon. Member wish to make a complaint of breach of privilege, it should be done at another time and I would then consider it on its merits.

Defence Review (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: I do not think it is a contempt in any sense. I have repeatedly pointed out that it is a form of cheating which is to be deprecated.

Defence Review (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: We must have a point of order if there is one, but I do not think there has been one up to now.

Defence Review (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: The position is that if the Minister asked leave to make a statement he would get it, because I have no power to refuse it. There is nothing else I can do about it. I give no encouragement about tomorrow, but I take the opportunity of saying that after having worked out a provisional timetable with the greatest possible care I find that thereafter there will be a Royal Commission...

Agriculture (White Papers) (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: I cannot deal with the matter of general practice now. It would merely hold up the House. Also, I should like to refresh my memory about the difficulties of this. I had to look at it once in the last Parliament.

Agriculture (White Papers) (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. Hon. Members cannot make speeches about this matter. There is very great pressure on the time of the House.

Agriculture (White Papers) (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. We must go on.

Agriculture (White Papers) (4 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: I am sorry. I have to decide these things, which is an extremely difficult task to discharge. We have spent more than 20 minutes on questions on this subject and it would not be fair to the rest of the House and its business to go on in that way.

Oral Answers to Questions — United Nations: Peace-Keeping Operations (2 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. The noble Lady will have to explain whether the report was one for which the Minister is responsible in some way; otherwise, it is out of order.

Oral Answers to Questions — United Nations: Peace-Keeping Operations (2 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. The Minister can answer as far as we have gone.

Oral Answers to Questions — Vietnam (2 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: That does not arise.

Oral Answers to Questions — European Economic Community (2 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. It is difficult to make progress with foreign affairs.

Oral Answers to Questions — State Visits (Processions) (2 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: Order. We must do some State driving. Let us get on.

Commonwealth Immigration (2 Aug 1965)

Sir Harry Hylton-Foster: We must pass on to the other business of the House.


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