Results 181–200 of 2879 for speaker:Mr Douglas Houghton

New Clause 2: Description of Candidate in Nomination Paper and on Ballot Paper (18 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: The hon. Gentlman is misleading the House if he is suggesting that Mr. Speaker's Conference did not have outside evidence. In reporting to the Prime Minister, Mr. Speaker said that the conference had studied with care masses of evidence and documentation from many sources. Surely we all remember the documents we received from the various political parties, only to mention a few and perhaps...

New Clause 2: Description of Candidate in Nomination Paper and on Ballot Paper (18 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I apologise for my late arrival in the Chamber on this occasion, but hon. Members always have to be in two places at once. I have just about managed it. I draw my right hon. Friend's attention to the fact that six major proposals were made by Mr. Speaker's Conference, that four were rejected, that one was modified and that the other was accepted. That is not a very good score for Mr....

Schedule 5: Insertions Authorised in Representa- Tion of the People Act 1949 in Revised Edition of Statutes (18 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I am a little puzzled at the course of the debate. When you called the Third Reading, Mr. Deputy Speaker, my hon. Friend the Member for Kingston upon Hull, North (Mr. McNamara), quick off the mark, gave us his most interesting analysis of the facts of the existing electoral arrangements in the local elections in his constituency. The right hon. and learned Member for St. Marylebone (Mr....

Schedule 5: Insertions Authorised in Representa- Tion of the People Act 1949 in Revised Edition of Statutes (18 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I was relating my observations to Clause 1, which deals with voting at the age of 18. I was explaining how things happened concerning me when that Clause was before the House in Committee. I shall leave that now for I think I have explained myself enough. The important point now to which the House has to have regard is how we are to prepare young people for their new responsibilities. I was...

Schedule 1: Exempted Goods (4 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I beg to move Amendment No. 94, in page 6, line 48, at end insert: 39.02 … … High density, high molecular weight polyethylene.

Schedule 1: Exempted Goods (4 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: Amendment No. 94 is one of a group of Amendments to the Schedule which I understand relates to artificial resins and plastic materials and covers as wide a range as synthetic rubber and seamless tubular artificial sausage casing made from regenerated cellulose. I am not aware of ever having had sausages encased in that material, but I have no doubt that it is very important.

Schedule 1: Exempted Goods (4 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: It is, so to speak, a non-skin. I will confine my remarks to Amendment No. 94. I suppose that this is a smaller moonbeam in the larger illumination of this Schedule. I cannot say that it has any great importance to the industrial activity and exports of this country, but it reveals the kind of anomaly and difficulty which many firms will encounter under the scheme. I make no apology for...

Schedule 1: Exempted Goods (4 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: We are getting on very well, but any additional equipment which enables us to get on better will be very welcome. With this material it is possible to make shuttles for textile manufactures. I am informed that the wood for a wooden shuttle will be imported under the exemptions provided for in the Schedule, but that the raw material to make a plastic shuttle will be caught by the Bill. I am...

Schedule 1: Exempted Goods (4 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I did not come here for the hon. Gentleman's sympathy, but for a concession from my right hon. Friends.

Schedule 1: Exempted Goods (4 Dec 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: The hon. Gentleman will realise that peanuts are also exempt.

Clause 1: Voting Age (26 Nov 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I deny categorically what my hon. Friend is saying. I was in the conference at that stage and I was present when these events took place. No one said, after the Latey Report came out, that it was irrelevant. Indeed, what we decided in waiting for it was that it was relevant. But it was not conclusive.

Clause 1: Voting Age (26 Nov 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: Since hon. Members on Mr. Speaker's Conference were nominated by the Chief Whips on either side of the House, does my hon. Friend think that those of us who served on it were put there in the hope that we should come out against votes at 18? I find it difficult to understand what the political strategy was, if the appointments to Mr. Speaker's Conference seemed to predetermine its...

Clause 1: Voting Age (26 Nov 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: It may be that this subject was too difficult and contentious to be referred to Mr. Speaker's Conference. What Mr. Speaker's Conference has done i9s to produce on a contentious issue the biggest common denominator of agreement of a conference composed of representatives from all sides of the House. That is what, traditionally, Mr.Speaker's Conference is intended to do, namely, to find an...

The Civil Service (21 Nov 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: Will the right hon. Gentleman tell me whether the Commission recommended the unified grading structure on the basis of the information brought back by Sir Philip Allen and the Chairman after only five days in the United States, or on the basis of a closer examination of the limitations and inflexibility of the American system?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (24 Apr 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: To judge from the debate so far, Selective Employment Tax has very few friends. I do not pretend to be one myself, and I was glad to hear the Chancellor say that he would set on foot an examination of the effect of the tax, its incidence and, I hope, its anomalies and injustices so that we can have a complete account of the way in which it has worked and what its economic and other effects...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (24 Apr 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: It is not as simple as that. I concede that most people who have retired are living on a smaller income than they had when they were at work and that many of them are living on fixed incomes. Nevertheless, there are quite a lot of retired people who are getting the benefit of the improved value of equities, of pension increases and, in a number of cases, of some form of employment. But we...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (24 Apr 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: The hon. Gentleman will not expect me to weep about that. I think that he might, with some justice in society dispossess himself of a little more than the child relief that he does not really need. However, I will reserve a soft spot in my heart for these people. As I get older I develop more compassion for the deprived members of the community—and I am sure that they are part of it.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (24 Apr 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I must get on. I have just given way to the hon. Member for Scarborough and Whitby (Mr. Michael Shaw). The purpose here is to withhold the benefit of the increases from those liable at the standard rate while those paying at a reduced rate are to benefit only proportionately. Here is the important fiscal significance of what the Chancellor is proposing in Clause 14. The principle of...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (24 Apr 1968)

Mr Douglas Houghton: I thank the hon. Gentleman for mentioning that, because I was coming to it. The social significance is that by this method we can increase the family allowance for poorer people beyond the point that we would otherwise do it, and at the same time we can save £60 million in the cost of family allowance increases proposed under the other Bill. Socially, fiscally and financially we have a...


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