Results 1–20 of 402 for speaker:Mr David Hardman

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: I could not help feeling that the right hon. Lady the Member for Moss Side (Miss Horsbrugh) was a little gloomy and pernickety in her opening remarks, and she ended up in the same strain. She was most anxious to know more about 1950. I am sorry that she has not allowed us some sort of celebration. A jubilee celebration is not unnatural after 50 years of progress, with which she agrees. We...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: Yes, Sir, I can give that assurance. It is true that there has been some doubt as to whether places were to be spread where, in fact, they were needed, but I can give the assurance that we no longer have that doubt which has been expressed in the past in this House by my right hon. Friend and myself. There is something else that we must bear in mind apropos the building programme, and that...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: That is what I meant to say. Another of the problems that face my right hon. Friend and myself in the field of technical education is that the demand for it is insatiable, and in spite of the fact that local education authorities have, since the war, started work on provisions estimated to cost the £18 million which I have detailed. It is quite impossible to accommodate all the students...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: I do not think that the hon. Gentleman need be so academically indignant. One is giving an official view, but, at the same time, painting out that there is a personal view as well. I should have thought that it was to the advantage of the Committee that it should be known quite clearly and honestly where Ministers stand in regard to these problems. If the hon. Member does not like the word...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: With equal respect, perhaps the hon. Member will wait until I have linked this up with the grammar school. It seems to me that we should welcome this experiment in the comprehensive school, and it should be given every support on educational grounds alone. It may be asked: Why is it today—and this is coming to the point which the hon. Member mentioned—so few proposals for comprehensive...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: We have had an example where an authority has emphasised this form of schooling as its main objective, and we want that experiment to go ahead; we wish it good will and hope for its success. The right hon. Lady referred to another problem which is confronting us at the present time and that is the closure of village schools. From what has been written in the Press and from what has been said...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: Yes, and are we going to suggest with our experience of school meals that it was not the best kind of meal to receive? There is a shortage of teachers to be taken into account especially a shortage of women teachers. There is the great difficulty of recruiting teachers for small schools. Undoubtedly, there is virtue in the village school at its best, and in the devoted service which so many...

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: If I may interrupt the hon. Gentleman, he will realise that there are grave site difficulties in London, and as far as the school to which he is referring is concerned, the children will have playing field facilities elsewhere.

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: I would remind the hon. Gentleman that experiments are taking place elsewhere.

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: Perhaps the hon. Member will allow me to make this point. Comprehensive schools are not necessarily all of the same kind or of the same size. It would be possible for one autho- rity, for example, in a rural area, to propose one kind of comprehensive school as an experiment which would be quite different from the kind which would be proposed, for example, by the L.C.C.

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: They are already used by the university college authorities in assessing the grants.

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: No.

Orders of the Day — Education (24 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: The fact is that there is no cut in expenditure on technical education, but there is delay in reaching the maximum.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: Subject to the general requirement that the school dinner shall be well balanced nutritionally and designed as the main meal of the day, the dietaries used are a matter for the discretion of the local education authorities and their expert advisers, who give very careful consideration to the children's nutritional requirements. I cannot, therefore say how many of the 2,600,000 dinners served...

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: The advice I have received is contrary to my hon. Friend's suggestion. At present there is a meat allowance for school dinners sufficient to serve meat four days out of five, and we have found that this is the most satisfactory meal and the one most desired by the majority of girls and boys attending school.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: There is no intention to limit the school meals service. As my hon. Friend knows, building to extend the service in existing schools was stopped in the autumn of 1949. The effect of the defence programme is that the resumption of building for this purpose will have to be postponed.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: I did not say that. I said on Thursday last that there would be a postponement of the increases which we had envisaged. We regret the postponement, but the fact is it will take a longer time to reach the capital expenditure which we would have put in our programme.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: If the work is necessary to extend an existing building it will not be reduced, and adequate dining facilities will be part of every new school to be constructed or at present under construction. That is as far as I can go.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: No, Sir, I would not admit that.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education: School Meals (5 Jul 1951)

Mr David Hardman: I am quite willing to take on the hon. Gentleman.


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