Results 61–80 of 2704 for speaker:Sir Douglas Hacking

Title (20 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: My hon. Friend the Member for Dulwich (Mr. Bracewell Smith) said that he believed in the sincerity of the Minister of Labour. I want to say at once that I, also, believe in his sincerity; it may have been misplaced, but that he is sincere I have not the slightest doubt. In saying that, I hope nobody will imagine that I or my colleagues, who have been opposing this Bill, have been insincere....

Title (20 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I am not asking anything about it. I am referring to the Minister's repeated statements about the tourist industry, which does touch the Clauses of the Bill, for otherwise, surely, the Minister would not have made that statement about assistance to the tourist trade. I will bow to your Ruling, Mr. Deputy-Speaker, but perhaps I may be allowed to say that the tourist trade to which the Minister...

First Schedule. — (Constitution, Officers and Proceedings of the Commmission.) (6 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I see that my name appears at the head of the list of those moving the Amendment. I gave a pledge a few days ago that I would not move any further Amendments, but I hope the Committee will pardon me if I take part in this discussion. So many bouquets have been thrown at the Minister that I hate to be left out. He has made a very important concession, and I believe it will go a long way...

Orders of the Day — Catering Wages Bill (1 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: Before we resume our proceedings on the Committee stage of this Bill, may I ask your permission to move to report Progress and ask leave to sit again, in order that I may be permitted to make a statement on the future of the Bill?

Orders of the Day — Catering Wages Bill (1 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I beg to move, That the Chairman do report Progress, and ask leave to sit again I desire to make a statement on the future attitude of myself and certain hon. Members who agree with me in the opposition which we have offered to this Measure. We have now spent two days on this Bill in Committee. For two days we have tried to reason with the Government. It has taken 12 hours to discuss four...

Orders of the Day — Catering Wages Bill (1 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: If the hon. Member will allow me, that is not quite what I said. I did not say that the Committee stage had been wiped out in advance. I was basing my argument and reasons on what had happened in this House during the last two days' Debate, that I had felt entitled to ask for concessions and that the concessions were all refused.

Orders of the Day — Catering Wages Bill (1 Apr 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: In spite of the disagreement on my proposals, I still think that I have done the right thing, and in these circumstances I beg to ask leave to withdraw the Motion.

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I agree with what my hon. and gallant Friend said, but surely we are getting into a little difficulty with regard to the general classification if we accept the Parliamentary Secretary's word. He said no one need be afraid that the good employer was going to be prejudiced in any way. I take it that he means that the good employer will not have to be regulated [Interruption.] I am glad my hon....

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: That is exactly my point. If he is brought into the scope of the Bill, he will have to be regulated in the same way that the bad employer will be regulated. If that is not so, what are we doing with this classification? The position is that the Commission decides whether or not a wages board should operate in any particular section of the industry, and, as I understand it, all the people...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: Inquiry will be made by the Commission, and the Commission is responsible for the setting-up of the wages board. It will decide definitely whether or not a particular section of the industry will have a wages board.

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I take it that, if the Commission is dissatisfied with remuneration and conditions of employment, the only thing it is empowered to do is to set up a wages board?

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: It is as narrow as this. The Commission only has the power, if it is dissatisfied after its inquiry into any particular section of the industry, of setting up a wages board. Is there to be any difference in the treatment meted out within any one section? If I can have a reply to that, it will give me some satisfaction.

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I agree with my hon. Friend the Member for Blackpool (Mr. Robinson) that seasonal workers always have expressions of sympathy passed on to them, and there it stops. The Minister of Labour has given us an assurance to-day, but what does it amount to? I took down his words as far as I was able to do so. He gave an assurance that he would ask the Commission to give special consideration to the...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: Tipping does come within the meaning of the word "remuneration"; there is no doubt about that, I take it? The Minister said just now that he felt this matter could be considered because the Commission had power to inquire into remuneration. Is he quite satisfied that tips are included within the meaning of the word "remuneration"?

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I do not want to delay progress on this Bill, but this question of tipping is a very important matter. The point we ought to have at heart is that tipping, if possible, should be abolished. That is the general feeling of the Committee, but the difficulty you are up against is how you are to abolish tipping. Not only have you to consider the feelings of the people who have been getting tips,...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I have very little more to say. (An HON. MEMBER: "Do not be hurried."] I am not being hurried. I was about to say that you must consider the view of people who are in receipt of tips, and I ask that although we are all in favour of the abolition of tipping, if it is possible, nevertheless we must give some thought to those who are receiving tips. There are few of us in this Chamber who...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I have taken the trouble to look up the meaning of these two words in the best dictionary I could find and have discovered that "welfare" includes health, prosperity and success. We are dealing specifically in this subsection with any matters affecting the remuneration, conditions of employment and health of such workers. In other words, we are making specific mention of health, prosperity...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: The Committee may be surprised that I should rise on this occasion in order to thank the Minister for his reply. I am sure that it was a proper reply, if I may be allowed to say so. It is wrong that consideration should be given to the restoration, repair and equipment of hotels, restaurants and boarding establishments under the terms of this Bill. The existing conditions will be dealt with;...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I think we are getting very confused in regard to the matter. As I understand the learned Solicitor-General, he says that the buildings, the restoration, repair and re-equipment of undertakings, could be considered by this Commission. That point has been disputed by my hon. and gallant Friend the Member for East Nottingham (Major Gluckstein). The Solicitor-General has made it clear that they...

Clause 2. — (General Functions of the Commission.) (31 Mar 1943)

Sir Douglas Hacking: I understood that it was the intention of the Chair to call the Amendment to line 18 of Clause 2.


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