Results 61–80 of 463 for speaker:Mr Rupert Gwynne

Oral Answers to Questions — Irish Free State.: Munitions and Stores. (10 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I am not yet in a position to furnish the figures, but I hope they will be available in time for inclusion in the White Paper upon the Financial Relations between the British and Free State Governments, which the Treasury have undertaken to present this Session.

Oral Answers to Questions — Irish Free State.: Munitions and Stores. (10 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: Our information is not complete by any means.

Oral Answers to Questions — Irish Free State.: Munitions and Stores. (10 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I understand that is the case as regards a considerable amount of the property referred to.

Oral Answers to Questions — Irish Free State.: Munitions and Stores. (10 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: If the right hon. Gentleman is referring to arms and ammunition sent from this country, I understand it was obtained through the Disposal Board.

Oral Answers to Questions — Irish Free State.: Munitions and Stores. (10 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: The right hon. Gentleman should address that question to the Treasury, who are responsible for the Disposal Board. I may add that as the Public Accounts Committee are now inquiring into the matter, it is not desirable to raise the question in the House at present.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ruhr Occupation.: British Area. (9 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I have been asked to reply to these questions. So far as I am aware, no recent measures taken by the French have materially affected the situation of the British Army on the Rhine. I am not aware of any restriction on the freedom of movement of British subjects entering or leaving the British zone, or of any influx of refugees, or of any anticipated food shortage. No special reports have been...

Oral Answers to Questions — Navy and Army Canteen Board. (4 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I cannot precisely verify the hon. and gallant Member's information, and I am not aware of its source, but, if it has been derived from the inquiries of the Select Committee of which he is a member, I would suggest that the matter could best be pursued at present by that Committee rather than by way of question and answer in the House. In general, my information is that, in the early months...

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Alexander Military Hospital, Portsmouth. (4 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I would point out that Army hospitals are not intended for persons unconnected with the Army, and I am not in a position specially to authorise a standing arrangement for the treatment of civilians at any hospital at the expense of Army funds. I am not aware, however, that first-aid has been refused by the hospital referred to in any case where it was requisite on urgent medical grounds. If...

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Canadian Hay. (4 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I am aware that some of the hay at present being supplied is Canadian, and I understand that it is at least equal in quality to the English hay. At Aldershot, however, the Canadian hay is less than half the total quantity supplied to date. It is the invariable practice of the Department to regard contract prices as confidential, and I regret, that I am unable to furnish particulars of them....

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Canadian Hay. (4 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I did not say I was discriminating against Canadian produce. I used the word "preference," and said that, all other things being equal, we gave preference to the English hay, the same as we give the Colonies preference against foreign countries.

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Canadian Hay. (4 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: That is my information in the present case; but, of course, you get good hay and bad hay in Canada, as well as in England. Much depends on the season.

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army of Occupation (Pay). (3 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: With the hon. and gallant Member's permission, I will circulate these figures in the OFFICIAL REPORT; but I may say that, in each week in question the official rate was slightly more advantageous to the soldier than the commercial rate would have been.

Oral Answers to Questions — MR. Wintour. (3 Jul 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: The answer is in the negative.

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: The hon. Member for Dumfries (Dr. Chapple) has made out a case, as he thinks, against the late Government One can conceive circumstances in which one could not defend the late Government, but in this instance I have no difficulty in doing so. This was a decision come to as long ago as 1921 by the late Government to do away with the colossal cordite factory at Gretna. The hon. Member complains...

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: The Report says that, except as a cordite factory, the Committee saw no useful purpose to which Gretna could be put. If this factory—no one disputes that it was carried on upon a vast scale—

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: No; that refers to the various ingredients required for the manufacture of cordite, and they say that except as a cordite factory they saw no useful purpose to which it could be put. Gretna could only be carried on economically as one to produce cordite on a large scale, so vast that under our present requirements we should only want it for one week in the year. I do not think that that...

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: What peace purposes does he suggest?

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: But these are in connection with munitions of war. How can an advocate of the League of Nations ask us to set up this vast factory—it makes no difference whether it is for cordite or other manufacture of that kind—that we should shut up Waltham Abbey and carry on Gretna Green, which is a much bigger undertaking?

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I have been quoting from the Report of the Pearson Committee, which said distinctly that it could only be carried on as a cordite factory. At any rate, whatever munitions may be manufactured there, I still contend that the hon. Member cannot on one day say he is an advocate of economy, of cutting down armaments, and of settling international disputes by conference, and on another day invite...

Orders of the Day — Gretna Factory. (9 May 1923)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: I think he did.


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