Results 101–120 of 821 for speaker:Mr Phil Gallie

BSE Crisis (13 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: The hon. Member for Pembroke (Mr. Ainger) said that his farmers are angry. Of course they are angry: every farmer in the United Kingdom is angry. Across the UK, most people, irrespective of whether they are involved in agriculture, are angry about BSE, CJD and the cull requirements. But I doubt whether any other Government would have been able to find the £2.45 billion compensation that the...

BSE Crisis (13 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: If that is the case for Northern Ireland, does my hon. Friend agree that there is also a good argument for considering the Scottish situation?

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: Will the hon. Gentleman give way?

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: rose—

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I thank the hon. Gentleman for giving way. For a while I had the feeling that he had something against Scots. He has repeatedly said that shooters will still be able to use rifles in pursuit of their sport. He is usually a great champion of the disabled. The disabled can use handguns, but cannot use rifles, especially from wheelchairs. Has the hon. Gentleman thought of that?

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: rose—

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: May I take my right hon. and learned Friend back to clause 8? Ammunition is not mentioned in connection with the transfer of pistols between one location and another. Is there a case for building in a separation factor, so that ammunition and pistols are never on the streets together?

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: The hon. Gentleman said that my right hon. Friend has not consulted on this matter. The Secretary of State published a document in June which clearly laid out his intentions, and from that he produced this excellent Bill. He has listened to people. I would guess that there has been a considerable response. Why does the hon. Gentleman say that he never consulted?

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: People reading tonight's debate will be somewhat mystified to discover that we are voting on an amendment that declines to give the Bill a Second Reading. They will be mystified because the hon. Member for Hamilton (Mr. Robertson) says that he wants the Bill to proceed but is using his motion as a device to bring about a debate. I realise that the hon. Gentleman is an expert in Opposition...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I dare say that Lord McCluskey will be interested in the hon. and learned Gentleman's comments. I should like to run through the results of the survey that we carried out. Individuals were asked to identify areas of concern across a range of national policies. More than 40 per cent. identified law and order as their No. 1 priority, with issues such as health and employment also mentioned. I...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I always give way to the hon. Gentleman.

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: Yes, it was organised by my constituency. I am quite prepared to hand round the survey sheet for hon. Members to see; it was designed not to pick up Tory votes but to ask questions about key issues. I make no apology for the fact that I put my faith in the public to give me guidance on certain issues. That is why I am referring to the survey, which showed that over 40 per cent. of people had...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: The hon. Gentleman is slightly impetuous. We asked whether there should be a referendum on capital punishment. I was going to raise that subject, because I was slightly surprised that only 60 per cent. of people were in favour—I had expected a higher figure. We did not specifically ask them whether they were in favour of the restoration of capital punishment; had we done so, the number in...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: The hon. Gentleman's point is unworthy of an answer, and I shall not give him one. I have said that we asked people whether they wanted a referendum on capital punishment, and 60 per cent. said yes. However, that was not the purpose of the survey. We were trying to find out whether there was general public support for the main issues included in the White Paper. We asked what a life sentence...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I have to admit that we tried to keep the survey fairly simple. We recognise that the great mass of the British public do not understand the niceties of our legal system—they leave the definitions to others. The people who responded to the survey expect the legal system to have a sense of justice and fairness. The hon. Members for Glasgow, Maryhill (Mrs. Fyfe) and for Glasgow, Govan (Mr....

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I will give way to the hon. Lady in a minute. My constituents see gangs of youngsters with super-lagers or Buckfast wine and other fortified wines—it is a shame that the hon. Member for Monklands, East (Mrs. Liddell) is not present—and they are mystified by the police's inability to do anything about it unless there is a perceived breach of the peace. The proposal to enable the police to...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I disagree with the hon. Lady. I have driven through her constituency—not stopping to make speeches, I hasten to add—and seen youngsters of 13 or 14 on the streets. If neither the police nor the hon. Lady cannot identify 13 and 14-year-olds, something is wrong. I understand that Glasgow city council has used local authority powers to impose an overall drinking ban. That is fine—the...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I recognise that seven years is a minimum sentence for drug traffickers, but it is too low and should be higher. There is no justification for anyone who attempts to sell drugs and is convicted for the third time. I welcome the abandonment of automatic release. I argued strongly in 1992–93 that the automatic halving of sentences was wrong. Prisoners should be able to earn remission, but I...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: Absolutely not. Prison officers are well equipped to deal with such problems, and I am sure that they will be able to cope, and that they will welcome the Bill's proposals. I was surprised to find that the Bill contains no mention of the right of appeal for the prosecution against summary court judgments. I am advised by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State that the subject is covered...

Orders of the Day — Crime and Punishment (Scotland) Bill (5 Nov 1996)

Mr Phil Gallie: I thank my right hon. Friend for that assurance. I would never doubt his commitment to ensuring that we do not adopt the nationalisation policies previously advocated by the Opposition—I am happy to say that even they now seem to have abandoned them.


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.