Results 1661–1680 of 1714 for speaker:Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I know that impressive court orders are made splitting up Standard Oil, dividing the share of markets in the Aluminum case, and so on. However, I doubt if, in spite of that elaborate network and vast expense, the old boy network has been effectively broken up in America. In fact, I propose to spend the long vacation in America studying this point.

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: No. The hon. Member is probably right when he says that the old boy network in America may be less effective than here, because they are not such old boys in the sense that they do not work in the same way as we do, and because the old boy network is not quite so strong there quite apart from any question of monopolies or restrictive practices. Here, it is extremely strong, and that...

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: No industry, until it has been actually examined, would admit that it was not in order. It is only after a decision by an impartial body, such as this one, that an industry will admit to itself, let alone to anyone else, that what it is doing is not perfectly proper, right and honourable. In 90 per cent. of the cases investigated industry has agreed to reverse certain practices hitherto...

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Until somebody has proved it to be so, it is not a malpractice. It is quite wrong to prejudge the issue and to say that something is a malpractice until an independent body has said so; it cannot be assumed to be anything but a good practice. For example, I referred at the beginning of my speech to a "closed door." That is something that everybody regards automatically as a malpractice, and...

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Mr. Fletcher-Cooke rose—

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Mr. Fletcher-Cooke rose—

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Mr. Fletcher-Cooke rose—

Orders of the Day — Monopolies Commission (23 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I have been trying to do so because the hon. and learned Member has twice repeated our pledge that we would use the Monopolies Commission to the full. Is he suggesting that the Monopolies Commission have not been working hard during the last six months, that they have not been working night and day? I can assure him that if he is suggesting that his suggestion is false.

Oral Answers to Questions — Fuel and Power: Branded Petrol (7 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: asked the Minister of Fuel and Power when he expects to allow branded petrol to be once again on sale to the public.

Oral Answers to Questions — Fuel and Power: Branded Petrol (7 Jul 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Is the Minister aware that we are almost the only civilised country in the world which gives the consumer no opportunity of buying better petrol and thus getting a greater mileage per gallon?

Oral Answers to Questions — Employment: Building Trade Workers, Sunderland (17 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Can my hon. Friend give the comparable figure for 1950?

Orders of the Day — Marine and Aviation Insurance (War Risks) Bill (16 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Surely the urgency of this Bill is crystal clear in spite of what the hon. Member for Enfield, East (Mr. Ernest Davies) has just said. It is because there may at any time be an extension of the situation, not of war in the old sense of near war, but in the Korean sense, and that at that moment the market will be unable to cope with the matter. We hope it will not happen: we all think it will...

Orders of the Day — Marine and Aviation Insurance (War Risks) Bill (16 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: That may be so, but the owners have to prove war risk or marine risk, and they often fall between two stools. I think it is necessary that war risk should be more closely defined than appears in the definition Clause, and I would ask the Minister to look at that point again.

Orders of the Day — Marine and Aviation Insurance (War Risks) Bill (16 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I think the hon. and learned Gentleman will find that when it came to the point it was marine risk which was underwritten by the Government.

Orders of the Day — Marine and Aviation Insurance (War Risks) Bill (16 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: It is important that this point should be cleared up. The ast thing hon. and learned Gentlemen on both sides want is that we should be involved in an immense amount of litigation, when it can be cleared up in the definition Clause of this Bill, which is a useful opportunity for so doing. I am sure the Bill is necessary, and I hope it will pass into law quickly.

Orders of the Day — Marine and Aviation Insurance (War Risks) Bill (16 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I said it was because there might be an extension of the war in Korea.

Orders of the Day — Marine and Aviation Insurance (War Risks) Bill (16 Jun 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Will the hon. Member not distinguish between the situation today and as it might be tomorrow and that though commercial trade has not been interfered with, that is not to say it may never be interfered with? That is a dangerous situation which any prudent Government must guard against.

Clause 45. — (Bodies Corporate Not Ordinarily Resident in the United Kingdom.) (26 May 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I want to put a question to the Chancellor. Do the profits that are brought into charge by this Clause include in their computation any amount of Excess Profits Levy that these foreign companies may have to pay in their countries? I know that there has been great mitigation on this question of double taxation, but I am under the impression that that has been related largely to Income Tax...

Clause 53. — (Assessment and Collection, etc.) (26 May 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: On a point of order. I am not experienced in these matters, but I understood it was not competent for a Private Member to move an Amendment which would increase the burden on the taxpayer. I gathered that that was a well-established constitutional principle, and I should like to know how it comes about that this Amendment is in order when undoubtedly it increases the burden on the taxpayer....

Orders of the Day — European Situation (14 May 1952)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Surely the hon. Gentleman means a tripartisan foreign policy?


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