Results 281–300 of 1714 for speaker:Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill (15 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Surely the hon. and learned Gentleman is misreading the Clause. The murderer has already to have been convicted of the first murder—

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill (15 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: It states: … if before conviction of that murder he has … been convicted of another murder …

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: The answer is, clearly, "No", but I might be prepared to rent it if the owner were able to let it at a higher rent than he is at present entitled to charge.

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: The hon. Member for Leicester, Northwest (Mr. Janner) has had a lot of experience in and out of court of the operation of the Rent Acts. I have had a certain amount of experience, and I think that one thing on which we can all agree is that when this Bill becomes law the amount of work for lawyers will be considerably reduced.

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: If there is one section of the community that this Bill will hit, it will be the lawyers.

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: All I know is that they provide a small but steady income for a great many people in both the junior and senior branches of the profession, and such income will no longer be available. When the hon. Member for Leicester, North-West says that people will be driven to the county court, all one can say is that by reducing the rateable value limit to £40 and then to £30 and eventually...

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I am glad that the hon. Gentleman puts his political views—as I do—before his professional interests. Undoubtedly it is true to say that the Rent Acts work will largely and progressively disappear. We have been talking about our constituencies, and I wish to refer to mine. I have had figures sent and the extraordinary thing is that in the borough of Darwen 99 per cent. of privately-owned...

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Had I known that the hon. Gentleman was proposing not to answer my question but to ask something completely different, I should not have given way to him. But I gather from the implication of his intervention that he agrees it is perfectly justifiable to compare the two policies, and I think that must be so. I am surprised that the hon. Gentleman should be frightened of a comparison. When he...

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: On page 44 of the pamphlet is the statement that there will be a subsidy on new houses, implying that there will be no subsidy on the houses that the municipalities are to take over under the Labour Party's proposals?

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: It is interesting how frightened hon. Gentlemen on the Opposition Front Bench are of the comparison. Every time an Opposition speaker refers to the subject he takes this very technical point that the House is not supposed to be discussing the Labour Party's proposals.

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: It may be difficult to answer because the party opposite has not made up its mind. It is a very important question.

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I perfectly well see the point. My question is: do the proposals of the hon. and learned Gentleman's party allow the municipality to use its funds to subsidise the houses that they are going to acquire compulsorily? It is a sensible question which can be answered with "Yes" or "No", provided that the party opposite has made up its mind.

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: That is very fair. It means that the Labour Party's policy is to allow the local authority to decide whether it should subsidise the rents of the houses that it is to acquire compulsorily. It is to be left to local option. I am grateful to the hon. and learned Gentleman. That is something we have been trying to get for a long time. Now we have it on the record, and I feel that my speech is...

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I suspected that that would be the answer. I do not believe they will be made to do it by all the methods that some people suggest—on my own side of the House as well—as by complicated certificates of one kind or another, of which we have all had experience. I give this point to hon. Gentlemen opposite. I do not believe, except marginally and here and there, that is really an effective...

Orders of the Day — Rent Bill (22 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: One cannot say whether they would all be in favour or not. The hon. Member for Hackney, Central said that not one hon. Member in this House could possibly be returned on the votes of landlords and householders and their families. I am not at all sure that that is absolutely right. In my constituency there is the highest proportion of home ownership in the country. I shall not argue that...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of "constructive Malice.") (27 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I do not think that the hon. Gentleman the Member for Oldham, West (Mr. Hale) is quite correct when he says that the words "constructive malice" have been the subject of a great deal of judicial interpretation. Judges are very careful about the use of those words. The term is really an invention of the text book writers and dons. The side-note of the Clause says "Abolition of' constructive...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of "constructive Malice.") (27 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: I would say that it is the dons' construction of a judicial construction of the common law, one farther removed, but I do not really think it is of importance because it is in the side-note. We have to look at what is in the Measure itself. What we are doing by this subsection, as I understand it, is to try to find out what "malice aforethought" is required for the killing to amount to...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of "constructive Malice.") (27 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: That may well be so. I should not like to say "yes" or "no" to the hon. Member. He may well be right. I find it difficult to isolate the sort of murder that does occur except in the course or furtherance of another offence. I suppose if there is such a murder—and there may be—the malice aforethought required must surely be an intention to kill. It cannot be anything else. If it be that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport: Road Transport (Alternative Facilities) (28 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: asked the Minister of Transport and Civil Aviation if he will issue a general direction to the British Transport Commission, that it should proceed no further with the closure or dismantling of any railway line whilst the present shortage of oil fuel continues.

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport: Road Transport (Alternative Facilities) (28 Nov 1956)

Mr Charles Fletcher-Cooke: Is it not wrong that the railways, including the Transport Commission, should be tearing up rails in the Isle of Wight and elsewhere which might well be needed over the next six months or more?


Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.