Results 1–20 of 452 for speaker:Mr Peter Doig

Orders of the Day — Fluorine Pollution (18 Jan 1979)

Mr Peter Doig: May I make a short point? There is a brain-washing campaign going on concerning toothpaste which contains fluoride. One may buy toothpaste but it is very difficult to know whether it contains fluoride. Can the Government do something, first, to stop this brainwashing campaign? Secondly, could they make it compulsory for those who sell toothpaste to say which toothpastes do not contain...

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Edinburgh (19 Apr 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: asked the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will pay an official visit to Edinburgh.

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Edinburgh (19 Apr 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: Will my right hon. Friend visit the hydro-electric board offices and look at its accounts, since it has substantially increased its charges in each of the last three years? Is the Minister aware that many of my constituents are having great difficulty in paying these high accounts, and in some cases have had to cut off their heating systems?

Earnings-Related Supplement (Benefit Ceiling Rule) (27 Feb 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: In this short Adjournment debate I should like to draw attention to the effects of the benefit ceiling rule, particularly as it affects many people who are in receipt of earnings-related supplement. I should like to deal first with how it has affected Mr William Gillan of Dundee. Mr. Gillan was paid off in the autumn of 1977—not an unusual occurrence for building trade workers. He was...

Orders of the Day — Scotland Bill: Scottish Consolidated Fund and Loans Fund (10 Jan 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: I shall make one or two quick points, because I know that a number of hon. Members are anxious to speak in the debate. The hon. Member for Inverness (Mr. Johnston) spoke about the power to impose different rates of tax. If this power were to exist, what would happen? Let us suppose, for example, that there were to be a different rate of tax on whisky in Scotland from that in England. If...

Orders of the Day — Scotland Bill: Scottish Consolidated Fund and Loans Fund (10 Jan 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: That is what we find when we go into the details. We shall eventually be forced back to a fixed formula, such as the eleven-eightieths that we had in the past, and if any change is to be made the argument will have to be supported with facts, whether it relates to the number of pensioners, the number of schoolchildren, the number of people requiring supplementary benefit or whatever it may...

Orders of the Day — Scotland Bill: Scottish Consolidated Fund and Loans Fund (10 Jan 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: What would be the effect? The 5 million people in Scotland would have to pay far more pensioners than they are now paying, and that would mean a lower standard of living for the rest of the Scottish people. Would hon. Members still be saying "Hear, hear"? The people who voted for them would not. We come back to the details of the matter, and the more one gets back to the details, the more one...

Orders of the Day — Scotland Bill: Scottish Consolidated Fund and Loans Fund (10 Jan 1978)

Mr Peter Doig: That is absolutely true. The unfortunate thing is that the Bill could pass simply because the only people who really know about it are the political parties. Each of the political parties for different reasons does not want it in reality. They want it to come about only for political reasons. My party does not really want it. The Conservative Party did not want it but panicked because it...

Orders of the Day — Crime (7 Nov 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: The public are rapidly losing faith in law and order in this country. I find in my constituency that an increasing number of people are too frightened to go out in the evenings, particularly women, and that men are frightened to take their families to football matches or anywhere that there is a large congregation of people. Some people are even frightened to stay in their own homes. This is...

Orders of the Day — Crime (7 Nov 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: My hon. Friends may laugh, but I believe that if people indiscriminately throw bombs the court should have the power to say that half a dozen bombers should be put together in a room and a bomb dropped on them. If a person poisons another he should be liable to be poisoned also. I am not saying that it should be compulsory; I am saying that the courts should have the power to impose such a...

Orders of the Day — Crime (7 Nov 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I should be quite satisfied if we did not measure it exacting grain by grain but simply used the same methods to an approximate degree. The public and I are convinced that if people knew that they were liable to receive from a court the same treatment that they had meted out to others it would be a deterrent. A prison sentence is not a deterrent and that is why crime is increasing. We must...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I fully agree with the hon. Member for Bury St. Edmunds (Mr. Griffiths) that it is scandalous that pickets at Grunwick's should be attacking policemen who are there to uphold and enforce law and order, but I thought it strange that he made no mention of a certain Mr. Ward, who was equally denying the right of his workers to join a union if they desired. The hon. Gentleman put all the...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I am amazed that the hon. Member for Birmingham, Stechford (Mr. MacKay) can really believe that when we merely had men on the beat they detected every crime that was ever committed. Nothing could be further from the truth. Very often it was difficult to find the man on the beat. The most common complaint was that one could never find a policeman when one wanted him. That is true even today....

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: It is a change that I would make willingly. Also, I do not think it is necessary to insist that every person becomes a witness. I return to the example that I gave earlier about the man in Dundee. When we telephoned the police and they arrested the man, we did not have to become witnesses in the court. There are a great many people who would be—to use an unpopular phrase—police,...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I read in a magazine about a proposal by the Howard League for Penal Reform to the effect that people should not be kept in prison beyond a certain number of years for fear that they might become "cabbages" and be of no use to anybody. What shall we finally end up with? Are we to give such people a gift of £2,000 to prevent them wanting to go off and steal a sum of that kind? Everybody knows...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I am not particularly interested in that form of crime. I am interested in the plight of constituents who go about in fear of their lives inside or outside their homes. They are liable to be beaten up in their homes and to have their valuables stolen. If they go outside their homes, they are also liable to be beaten up and robbed. That is what I am concerned about rather than the subject of...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I am astonished that my hon. Friend should take the example of a man who has been nothing but a criminal all his life. That is the man he is concerned about. It has never yet been proved that that man did not commit the murder. It has been proved to the satisfaction of an appeal court, but it has never been proved in any other court. The Secretary of State pardoned him, and that was fair...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: I am afraid I shall not be sidetracked into that area.

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: It may be less than the death penalty, but if it provided an effective deterrent and the crime was serious enough there might be a case for taking somebody's arm instead of taking somebody's life. Again, this is for the judge to decide in the circumstances. [An HON. MEMBER: "It is a Committee point."] Some hon. Members may think that it is a huge joke, but they are concerned about the man who...

Crime (Prevention) (12 Jul 1977)

Mr Peter Doig: An average of one person every two years was executed.


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