Results 1–20 of 3236 for speaker:Mr Nicholas Budgen

Business of the House ( 6 Mar 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Has my right hon. Friend seen the results of a recent MORI poll, commissioned by Zee television, an Asian network, which show that 62 per cent. of the Asian residents of this country who were polled by MORI held the view that the current immigration and asylum regulations were too lenient? Does not my right hon. Friend agree that we owe it to the whole nation—including the Asian community,...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements ( 4 Mar 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Will my right hon. Friend agree that one of the great successes of the past 18 years has been the strict control of immigration, which has much reduced racial tension in this country? Will he condemn the proposals, even by new Labour, to abolish the primary purpose rule and to grant immigration rights to the extended family? Does he agree that that will increase racial tension and create...

Firearms (Amendment) Bill: Having Small-Calibre Pistol Outside Premises of Licensed Pistol Club (18 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: One of the great advantages of disassembly is that it would considerably reduce the compensation bill. If, at some later stage, we finish up discovering that the European Court of Human Rights—particularly once the convention is incorporated into our domestic law, perhaps under a Labour Government—requires us to pay £500 million, which is eight times the cost of Britannia, for this...

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental (18 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does the hon. Gentleman agree that one of the advantages of the hereditary peerage is that hereditary peers are not full-time professional politicians, as are, unfortunately, the bulk of the present Members of this House? Hereditary peers probably know a great deal more about the practicalities of using weapons than do any of us, and their view is likely to be helpful to the protection of...

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental (18 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: I agree with every word that passed the lips of the hon. Member for Stockton, North (Mr. Cook). This is a bad Bill, which has been badly considered. At least some of my hon. Friends will be concerned about the wider problem of creating an unnecessary confrontation between this House and the House of Lords. We who are anxious to preserve our constitution and its checks and balances should...

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental (18 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: I would try to be as sympathetic as I possibly could, and I would explain to them that I understood entirely their wish to have the use of all guns banned; but I would say that people who engaged in the lawful and honourable activity of target shooting were entitled to continue to do that. I would say at the end of the conversation, as quietly and as carefully as I could, that as a matter of...

Orders of the Day — Firearms (Amendment) Bill (Allocation of Time): Supplemental (18 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: I am grateful to my hon. Friend. I was trying to put my point as moderately as possible. When I mentioned figures, I wanted to quote the lower end of the scale. I hope that their Lordships will recognise that, whether it is 50,000 or 100,000, it is not a fashionable section of the community. I hope that they will consider how they would feel if that many game shooters were being prevented...

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does the right hon. Gentleman agree that one of the most disagreeable features of modern politics is the way in which new Labour has tried to become more authoritarian than the Tory party? Its policy appears to be that, if the Tories are in favour of kicking a beggar once, new Labour is in favour of kicking a beggar twice. As a result, the official Opposition have not done their job on the...

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does the right hon. Gentleman concede that the bugging done in the past by the police was not illegal? The police have, very honourably, come to the Government and said that they think that what they are doing could be subject to criticism in the future, and that they would like a proper statutory framework for those activities. Is it not most unfortunate that the Government are not giving...

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does my right hon. and learned Friend agree that, particularly in our constitution, there can never be an absolute guide on what is a constitutional question? When there is uncertainty, it is necessary to examine the political background. The Labour party has abandoned the proper adversarial role of the Opposition. As a result, there has not been adequate discussion about prior authorisation....

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does my right hon. and learned Friend concede that it is obvious that the House is deeply concerned about the details of prior authorisation? This is the first time the House has been able to express its views on the details. Since the measure must carry the confidence of the whole country, on reflection would it not be better to have a debate on the Floor of the House rather than to have...

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does the right hon. Gentleman agree that, in view of the widespread misunderstanding, it would be very much better—to restore public confidence—if these issues, particularly that of prior authorisation, were debated on the Floor of the House rather than tucked away in semi-privacy upstairs?

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Will the right hon. Gentleman give way?

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Does the right hon. Gentleman agree that the use of a code of practice is unsatisfactory, particularly when the House does not have access to it? It would be much better if the code were incorporated in the statute, which would require either the House or the Standing Committee to consider it a great deal more carefully.

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: On a point of order, Mr. Deputy Speaker.

Police Bill [Lords] (12 Feb 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: On a point of order, Mr. Deputy Speaker. Will the Home Secretary confirm that he is proposing to lay the code of practice before the House in the form of a statutory instrument, and that the House will have no opportunity to amend it or consider it in detail? Will he confirm that it will be either passed or rejected after a debate in general terms lasting an hour and a half?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (14 Jan 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: The hon. Member for Alyn and Deeside (Mr. Jones) is, of course, entirely justified in this general debate in referring to what he believes to be a grave omission from the Finance Bill. I wish to start by saying how much I enjoyed the maiden speech of the hon. Member for Barnsley, East (Mr. Ennis). I enjoyed his wit, his attachment to his constituency and his elegant and amusing reference to...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (14 Jan 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: I will come to that subject as I am nearly as preoccupied by it as my hon. Friend is. I will make the domestic point first. The Labour party says that it will not raise taxation generally and that it will be able to stick to that. I think that will be difficult. Clever young men in Tory central office have added up the commitments made by Labour for increased expenditure and they amount to...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (14 Jan 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: Will the hon. Gentleman give way?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (14 Jan 1997)

Mr Nicholas Budgen: The hon. Gentleman talks about the need for stability in interest rates, so will he explain whether the Labour party is against any increase in interest rates between now and, say, 1 May?


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.