Results 1–20 of 1420 for speaker:Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (24 Apr 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: Listening to the right hon. and gallant Gentleman addressing the Committee with his usual vigour, I found it difficult to realise that to-morrow it will be exactly 25 years since I had to follow him in another sphere and another capacity. In those days he was an inspiring leader for all of us, and I would, if I may, say to him, across the interval of a quarter of a century, what a pleasure it...

Orders of the Day — Amendment of Law. (24 Apr 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: Might I ask the hon. Member—because this is a matter which might interest his constituents—whether he regards the complete defeat of the enemy in war as an act of vengeance; or does he wish the war to cease now, with an inconclusive peace?

Ways and Means.: Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury. (12 Nov 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: May I express my pleasure on hearing, after a long interval, the hon. and gallant Member for West Leeds (Captain V. Adams)? It is some time since he and I attended a Debate together, and I welcome the fact that apparently Saul has not only taken the road to Damascus, but has donned the King's uniform in the process. The hon. and gallant Member takes the rather extraordinary view that not only...

Ways and Means.: Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury. (12 Nov 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: As Chief Whip of the Government he was responsible for the agreement in endeavouring to persuade Government supporters to vote for the Government which they were elected to support. I do not think that justifies his exile to the Suez Canal or any other place.

Ways and Means.: Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury. (12 Nov 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: I listened without interrupting the hon. and gallant Member, and under some provocation. As I promised to detain the House for only some three minutes, I wonder if he would be good enough to allow me to address myself to one particular section of the speech he has just made. He said that he hoped the Patronage Secretary was pleased with the devastation of the capital in the East End and in...

Ways and Means.: Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury. (12 Nov 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: I am afraid that military training has caused the hon. and gallant Member to think that the parade ground allows only one voice to be heard; but the hon. and gallant Member has not been long enough in the Army to appreciate discipline himself. I remember very well the Adjournment Debate in 1932, when the present Prime Minister gave voice to some extremely sceptical remarks regarding the...

Ways and Means.: Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury. (12 Nov 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: I am very glad to know that; but, at least, he will admit making speeches in this House advocating a reduction of armaments.

Ways and Means.: Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury. (12 Nov 1940)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: It may have been an error into which all of us have fallen; I certainly did not. I took the line in that Debate, and in other Debates, in support of the present Prime Minister for a programme of naval reconstruction. It ill becomes one who adopted pacifism during those years to accuse a right hon. Gentleman or any other Member in this House of responsibility for that devastation. I hope the...

Orders of the Day — Ways and Means. (9 Apr 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: I did not have the good fortune to hear the Chancellor make his Budget Statement, but I read the report as soon as I could, and if the speech sounded as well as it read hon. Members must have had two hours of lucid exposition of a very complicated Budget. The Chancellor paid what have become the usual annual tributes to the taxpayers, direct and indirect, for the cheerful and determined...

Service Pay and Dependants' Allowances. (16 Oct 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: Did the hon. and gallant Gentleman also notice that the Trades Union Congress advocated an increase of the basic rate to 3s. per day?

Service Pay and Dependants' Allowances. (16 Oct 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: Naturally, this Debate has centred chiefly upon the effect of these proposals on the Army. I obtained special leave to attend this Debate, as one who took no part in the recent campaign for increased allowances for officers, not because I had no sympathy with it, but because I thought that the case of an increase for the rank and file was considerably more urgent. I am gravely disappointed...

Service Pay and Dependants' Allowances. (16 Oct 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: I believe, in all seriousness, that these young men believe the issue to be so vital that even if you cut their pay in half they would still give of their best without thinking of pounds, shillings and pence. But this fact alone—and it is this observation that I want to impress upon the Minister—the fact of their willing service and their splendid sacrifice to achieve victory, come what...

Service Pay and Dependants' Allowances. (16 Oct 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: No doubt the Minister will have in mind that single young men are capable of having dependants.

Orders of the Day — Service Pay and Dependants' Allowances. (17 Dec 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: When the hon. Member for Batley (Mr. H. Beaumont) delivered his maiden speech in this House, I was guilty of the impropriety of an interruption, not realising that it was the first occasion on which he was addressing us. That makes it the greater pleasure to congratulate him on the admirable manner in which he has put his case before the House to-day. The hon. Member confined himself to the...

Orders of the Day — Service Pay and Dependants' Allowances. (17 Dec 1941)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: I will listen to the speech of the hon. Member for Burslem when it comes. I have a feeling that the reason why the Service demands get side-tracked for so long—it is about two months since this matter was raised—is because these men are not vocal and because they have no trade union. But they have the House of Commons, and those of us who happen to be serving in this war would be lacking...

Motion of Confidence in His Majesty's Government. (28 Jan 1942)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: On the Monday when the House was hurriedly summoned on account of the Japanese blow in the Pacific, I remember saying to a friend that the critics would now take on a new lease of life, and that probably in a few weeks we should have a showdown in the House of Commons regarding the Government's conduct of the war, in view of the likelihood of Japan running amok in the early stages of the war....

Orders of the Day — Mercantile Marine. (19 Mar 1942)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: For many years I have followed with great interest the career of the hon. Member who is now Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of War Transport. I should like, if I may, to take this opportunity to congratulate him on his well-earned promotion. The hon. Member has, for many years, built up for himself a great reputation as an internationalist, and I am convinced, therefore, that he will...

Orders of the Day — Mercantile Marine. (19 Mar 1942)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: It is a circular which has been sent to me and I thought it was sent to all hon. Members. It is sent by the National Maritime Board, and signed by D. M. Robinson, Clerk-in-charge. Included with it is a letter to the Press, signed by a number of gentlemen, the President of the Shipping Federation, the Employers' Association of Liverpool, the Marine Engineers' Association, the Officers...

Orders of the Day — Mercantile Marine. (19 Mar 1942)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: There is also a large number of Commanders R.N.R. drawn straight from the Merchant Service.

Orders of the Day — Mercantile Marine. (19 Mar 1942)

Lieut-Commander Joseph Braithwaite: Can the hon. Gentleman tell the House how many of the beneficent reforms he has outlined were brought about on the initiative of the National Maritime Board? Is it not the case that great pressure had to be put upon them to initiate them?


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