Results 1–20 of 2216 for speaker:Dr Rhodes Boyson

European Union (12 Dec 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: On 21 May 1992, I spoke on Second Reading of the European Communities (Amendment) Bill. I voted for Second Reading and against Third Reading. At that time I was worried about the agricultural policy, the single currency and all regulations from Europe. I am still worried about the single currency, and I am now worried about over-regulation, the opt-outs and how we should proceed. The...

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements ( 5 Dec 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: Is my right hon. Friend aware that there is great rejoicing today in the knowledge that A-level standards will be retained and strengthened? Does he agree that that is one of many reforms introduced by the Government for the benefit of British education?

Orders of the Day — Education Bill (11 Nov 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: The Labour party believes that they should be compulsory. It is the party of compulsion.

Orders of the Day — Social Policy (25 Oct 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I welcome the Gracious Speech and want to give my views on three issues—two of them concerned with social security and one with education, on which I shall speak at greater length. The same social security issues arise time and again because human nature remains consistent. One may try to solve problems but 10, 20 or 30 years later, they arise again. Social problems that were covered by...

Orders of the Day — Social Policy (25 Oct 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: If the hon. Gentleman is under threat of deselection, most Conservative Members will hire a coach, go to his constituency and temporarily wear red roses to help him gain re-election to the House.

Orders of the Day — Social Policy (25 Oct 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I thank my hon. Friend for that comment. There is selection in many spheres. The tone-deaf are not encouraged to take up music. I am slightly tone-deaf, and in church my wife always tells me to shut up if suddenly I feel an urge to sing at the top of my voice. Perhaps in church I should be selected to be placed with others who cannot sing in tune. In music, someone who has a part 1...

Orders of the Day — Social Policy (25 Oct 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I will give way.

Orders of the Day — Social Policy (25 Oct 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I agree that parental involvement is vital but in addition children must be taught at the level of their ability. I will explain why I am speaking on this subject now. I know that the Liberal Democrats have many narrow objections—that is probably why the country does not like them—but the debate on the Queen's Speech should be a wide one. It should not deal only with bits and pieces—we...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: The hon. Member for Blackburn (Mr. Straw) is also a supporter of Blackburn Rovers. My father burned the results because that year the team was knocked out of the cup at an early stage.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I welcome the opportunity to speak on the education policy of the Conservative and Labour parties. It was in Islington—and under Labour—that I saw education break down as I had never seen it break down before. When I arrived in Islington as the head of Highbury Grove school, I was still a member of the Labour party, but what I saw there drove me out as a refugee to the Conservative...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: Indeed. I am so excited, but I must control myself. Highbury Grove was the most over-subscribed school in London at that time, and it was the working class parents and their children who kept up standards. It certainly taught me a lesson about where I stood politically. From time to time, we see a movement towards common sense in the Labour party, and we drink to it. If the Opposition paid...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: My hon. Friend has remembered the advice that I gave him. I advised parents to stand outside the school gates to see how quickly the children went in the morning and how slowly they came out at the end of the day—or vice versa—and, if the staff came out so fast at 4 o'clock that they knocked the children down, to go home, as nothing could be done with that school. It is the best test of...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: My hon. Friend, who also taught in the east end of London and whom I first met on my second day in London—obviously, he has influenced me in relation to the Conservative party—mentioned setting, but I have said enough about that.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: If the hon. Gentleman is offering to show me a school that is totally setted, I shall give way. If not, I shall not. I am waiting for such an offer from anywhere in the world, and I shall accept it.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: That means that every school will organise itself and that there will be no interference from socialist authorities such as Islington. Am I right in that? Will schools in Islington be able to organise themselves in exactly the way they want without any interference from the local authority?

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I feel that policy is being made as we speak and that we are in the centre of the world. However, I shall move on, as I wish to make two more points. My second point relates to grammar schools. Apparently they will be allowed to remain.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: No. I am godfather to my hon. Friend's son, so I shall restrain my hon. Friend. There are currently 161 grammar schools and they will be allowed to continue, provided they receive an affirmative vote. Perhaps the rest of the country should be brought in on that. Why cannot the rest of the country be allowed to decide whether to bring back grammar schools? However, it is a step in the right...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: I shall not let the hon. Gentleman in again because I am about to sit down. I shall get my own back at the end of the debate.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Standards in Education (11 Jun 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: It is the Labour party's fault.

Opposition Day: Council Tax ( 1 Apr 1996)

Dr Rhodes Boyson: Local government is always important. I believe that a healthy local government administration throughout the country is part of the spread of liberties and power. I remember when we had much smaller local authorities than we have now. My first local authority, in Lancashire, covered only 13,000 people and was very well run. In the reorganisations of 20 or 30 years ago, it was brought into a...


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