Results 1–20 of 99 for speaker:Mr Thomas Warner

Orders of the Day — ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE BILL [Lords]. (27 Jul 1923)

Mr Thomas Warner: We have been listening attentively in this Debate to the words of lawyers, and I have come to the conclusion that juries are very much to be pitied, because it is very difficult for the ordinary layman to realise what the facts of the case are when they are put in perfectly legal form. One thing, however, has come out very clearly, and that is that we are not going to get the same amount of...

Class Ii.: Colonial Office. (25 Jul 1923)

Mr Thomas Warner: What is to be the cost of the new cable?:

Orders of the Day — Public Works Loans Bill. (6 Jul 1923)

Mr Thomas Warner: The price at which you buy it?

Orders of the Day — RAILWAYS (AUTHORISATION OF WORKS) BILL [Lords]. (6 Jul 1923)

Mr Thomas Warner: For each year?

Orders of the Day — RAILWAYS (AUTHORISATION OF WORKS) BILL [Lords]. (6 Jul 1923)

Mr Thomas Warner: All that has been said by the hon. Member who has just sat down as to the origin of this Clause is absolutely correct. I have the greatest fear as to the enormous powers given to the great railway companies. This House must keep control over them, and the Minister must have very close control over them as well. Sir Eric Geddes urged that the Minister should keep a watch on the railway...

Orders of the Day — RAILWAYS (AUTHORISATION OF WORKS) BILL [Lords]. (6 Jul 1923)

Mr Thomas Warner: If my words be not possible would the Parliamentary Secretary offer us some equivalent, so as to give this House power to stop these Orders should it not approve them?

Oral Answers to Questions — Peace Treaties.: Government Printing (Harrow Works). (30 Nov 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: Is it proposed to keep on these Harrow printing works?

Oral Answers to Questions — Peace Treaties.: Rent Restrictions Act. (30 Nov 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: (by Private Notice) asked the Prime Minister what decision the Government have come to in regard to the House of Lords decision on the Rent Restrictions Act?

Oral Answers to Questions — Peace Treaties.: Rent Restrictions Act. (30 Nov 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: Will the Cabinet Committee inquire into the whole of the circumstances, not only to what extent misunderstandings have happened in Scotland, but the question and difficulties of landlords and small occupiers?

Constabulary (Ireland) Bill.: New Clause. — (Provisions as to disturb ance allowance, etc.) (1 Aug 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: The Noble Lord has put his point in a very intricate manner. If it be true that it would be to the benefit of these men that they should have a statutory claim, then it certainly amounts to a charge on the public, and, therefore, it is absolutely a breach of privilege.

Constabulary (Ireland) Bill.: New Clause. — (Provisions as to disturb ance allowance, etc.) (1 Aug 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: But the Noble Lord said it could be brought in in another place. It is not a sound proposition that the Lords in another place should be able to put charges into the Bill. The point is distinctly this. If it is to be of any benefit at all, whether a benefit in money or by claiming a thing as a right instead of by grace, then I submit it is a breach of privilege to put it in in this way.

Orders of the Day — ALLOTMENTS BILL [Lords].: New Clause. — (Travelling facilities for occupiers of allotment gardens.) (28 Jul 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: I think there are very strong objections to this Clause, whether it be the existing law or not. First, it is an encouragement to local authorities to spend money in a surreptitious way, practically putting something on the rates without people knowing it; and, secondly, the very thing which the Mover suggested as an advantage—

Orders of the Day — ALLOTMENTS BILL [Lords].: New Clause. — (Travelling facilities for occupiers of allotment gardens.) (28 Jul 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: I hope no circular will be sent out. If it be the law as suggested, let the authorities put it in force if they choose, but do not encourage and urge them to spend money in this way—a way which many allotment holders think would be very undesirable.

Orders of the Day — ALLOTMENTS BILL [Lords].: Clause 16. — (Limitation on Expenditure on allotments and rents to he charged.) (28 Jul 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: Does my right hon. Friend, who has moved this Amendment, really want to increase allotments in the country? If he does, surely this Amendment is the very way to stop them. It seems to me that all through the Debate, he has been trying to discourage allotments, and this Amendment is distinctly trying to discourage local authorities from putting this Bill into force. If the local authority make...

MERCHANDISE MARKS BILL [Lords]. (5 Jul 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: This Bill is a very extraordinary Bill. I regret very much that I was not here earlier to hear the explanation of it. As it stands, it is quite clear, as the last speaker has said, that it will be a great detriment to the trade of the country. I do not think it is in a form to go to a Committee, nor do I think it is possible that the Government could have realised what is the meaning of such...

Orders of the Day — Class Ii.: Home Office. (29 Jun 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: On a point of Order. Is it right that the right hon. Member should accuse Members who have been sitting here for a long time, of not listening to the Debate? Is it not only out of order, but very improper?

Orders of the Day — Class Ii.: Home Office. (29 Jun 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: I do not think it fair that this Debate should conclude without any hon. Member having spoken in support of the Home Secretary. Many of us on this side of the House thoroughly support him. We must put aside all question of the enormous good which this police force might do, because that is not a fair position to take up. At the present moment we have to give up a great many things which might...

Orders of the Day — Class Ii.: Home Office. (29 Jun 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: They are not absolutely necessary.

Supply. (29 Jun 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: The answer to the hon. Member for the Forest of Dean (Mr. Wignall) as to London 'buses was not satisfactory. It was suggested that the regulations allowing people to stand were continued in force because there were more 'buses to be put on the streets. If more 'buses were put on the streets, instead of adding to the congestion they would decrease it. The more 'buses there are the fewer...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill.: Clause 6. — (Excise duties on sugar and molasses made from home-grown materials to cease.) (20 Jun 1922)

Mr Thomas Warner: I think somebody at this time, some supporter of the Government., ought to get up and make a protest. Last night I came into the House with the intention of supporting the Government, but a Protectionist speech by the Solicitor-General sent me out of the House. This afternoon I come here and I hear what is advocated by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the ground of the protection of a small...


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