Results 41–60 of 284 for speaker:Lord Newton of Braintree

Welfare Reform Bill: Third Reading (31 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I wonder whether I might intervene briefly. I am in a slightly awkward position, and it may not surprise the House to know that I have been approached by all parties to this argument, either to say something on their side or to shut up. I am going to make a slightly ambivalent speech which will leave a lot depending on the Minister. I fully support the concerns that have been...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (6th Day) (30 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, given that this is Committee, perhaps I may intervene again. I forgot to say, because I stood up in some haste, that the numbers point is interesting, as a consequence of what I call the slow burn, where a lot of cases that are appearing now relate to injury caused many years ago. My understanding is that cancer is one of the few whose incidence is, if anything, increasing rather...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (6th Day) (30 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I wonder whether I might come in briefly, not least because of the reference to the later amendment of the noble Lords, Lord Alton and Lord Wigley, and others that is acknowledged to be related to asbestosis, which in effect is raised by one of the amendments in this group. I hope that the noble Lord, Lord Alton, will understand. I had indicated that I might speak in support of his...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (6th Day) (30 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: As a non-lawyer trespassing with great trepidation into this lawyers' paradise territory I am prepared to accept that, but to a layman "physical or psychological injury" as a definition of any serious kind would cover pretty well anything. If I am told I am wrong then I will accept that, but at the moment I think it is in doubt. Having made that point, which will indicate that were there to...

Welfare Reform Bill: Report (6th Day) (25 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, if anyone wondered why I moved from my earlier position, they would have guessed that it was to stand shoulder to shoulder with my noble and learned friend Lord Mackay. He and I were in cahoots over the attempts to tackle this problem 20 years ago. We were in cahoots with what was said in Committee on this matter, and I have made it clear that I intend to remain in cahoots with him...

Welfare Reform Bill: Report (6th Day) (25 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I can hope only that my noble friends on the Front Bench have already realised that Newton on Wednesday will not necessarily be the same as Newton on Monday. After Monday, I am amazed that the noble Baroness, Lady Lister, is still prepared to accord me hero status. I give her full credit for that. I do not know whether she regards me as adequate cavalry in substitute for the noble...

Welfare Reform Bill: Report (6th Day) (25 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I just want one penn'orth. I completely support these amendments, but they give me the opportunity which I missed earlier in these proceedings to record on the Floor of the House that the single silliest thing in this whole affair is the determination of the Department for Communities and Local Government to have separate council tax benefit systems in every corner of the country....

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill — Committee (5th Day) (Continued) (24 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, since this seems to be a harry-the-Minister moment and I need to make up for yesterday, can I put a couple of questions to my noble and learned friend that I would like him to think about while he is waiting? First, in my considerable experience of tribunals generally, employment tribunals have always really thought that they should be courts. They behaved much more like courts than...

Welfare Reform Bill — Report (5th Day) (23 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I had not intended to speak again, having had my say earlier, and will not repeat what I said, although I cleave to the view that this is not a sensible way to deal with these problems; they should be dealt with in secondary legislation. In that, I embrace the comments made by the noble and learned Baroness, Lady Butler-Sloss, about people taking in other people's children and the...

Welfare Reform Bill — Report (5th Day) (23 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: I meant to say at the beginning, but I do not think I did, that if anyone can be held responsible for the continued existence of child benefit in this country, it is me. In the late 1980s, it had not been uprated for two or three years. I became Secretary of State for Social Security. I fought tooth and nail to reintroduce the upgrading of child benefit. I had a lot of battles with a lot of...

Welfare Reform Bill — Report (5th Day) (23 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: The issue is at what level the benefit cap should be set, and whether to set a different level that automatically puts people with children, depending on the number, in a position in which fewer of them can afford to take jobs at the rates they are likely to be able to command. It is a matter of judgment not of fact. It is an issue that cannot be evaded, but it has been evaded in a lot of the...

Welfare Reform Bill — Report (5th Day) (23 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: Irresistibly, in view of what my noble friend Lord Fowler has said, I find it necessary to make what I hope will be a brief intervention. This is a rather grandiose claim but I am going to make it: probably I alone, but certainly I and my noble friend together, have more experience of social security and its reform than any other people in history, let alone currently present in your...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (4th Day) (18 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: Perhaps I may briefly intervene, having been frightened off by the fact that no one else, other than lawyers, has dared to speak this afternoon-it is just the Minister and I who share this disadvantage, disability or whatever it is. On a number of occasions I have declared an interest as chair of a mental health trust, which is no longer the case because it merged with another one on New...

Welfare Reform Bill: Report (4th Day) (17 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, for the second time today I feel that I need to say something, however brief, because of my history. Just as I engaged in badinage earlier with the noble Baroness, Lady Lister, about the Social Fund, I now have to declare to the House-possibly as a proud boast-that as a Minister I was responsible for introducing the disability living allowance in the early 1990s. I was given huge...

Welfare Reform Bill: Report (4th Day) (17 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I speak as a heretic who is even now probably having his burning at the stake prepared by the Secretary of State for Local Government, my right honourable friend Eric Pickles, because I believe in ring-fencing. I have always thought it daft that Governments make available for a specific purpose money that is then spent by other people on something else. The Government get the blame...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (3rd Day) (16 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: There is something that the noble Lord has not mentioned, which could be an important factor, bearing in mind his reference just now to children left helpless and some of his earlier cases studies relating to single-parent families. I cannot remember the figure but there is a huge cost for every child taken into care. I would like the Minister to tell us the cost of each child taken into care...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (3rd Day) (16 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I intervene briefly not to support every last dot and comma of the amendment-not least because I have not heard what the Minister has to say about cost, which we cannot completely ignore-but to indicate my general sympathy with the concerns that have been expressed by the noble Baroness and echoed by the noble Lord, Lord Wigley. I indicated earlier my concern about the Bill...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (3rd Day) (16 Jan 2012)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I rise in the hope of commanding your Lordships' attention for two reasons. First, my name is on one of the amendments in this group in the name of my noble friend Lady Eaton. Secondly, since I was unable to be here last week, I want the Front Bench to know that I am back. I have listened with care to the speeches that have been made, and obviously I express my support in particular...

Health and Social Care Bill: Committee (15th Day) (21 Dec 2011)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I intervene briefly and in a way that my noble friend may find somewhat unexpected. Can I just express some concern-although I have a lot of sympathy with many of the things that they say-about the number of ex-Ministers who seek to throw overboard, in a very short space of time and in a particularly short-term context, the policies that have been maintained by successive...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill: Committee (1st Day) (20 Dec 2011)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I shall intervene briefly. My remarks, such as they are-I hope they will not be long-apply also to quite a number of other amendments for which I shall not be able to stay, some of them in the name of the noble Lord, Lord Bach. At Second Reading, I indicated that I have a lot of sympathy with many of these concerns, not least those in the field of welfare, for exactly the reason...


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