Results 1–20 of 284 for speaker:Lord Newton of Braintree

Immigration Appeals (Family Visitor) (No. 2) Regulations 2000 (2 Nov 2000)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I rise to speak briefly in this important debate. I should like to express my thanks to the noble Lord, Lord Judd, for giving us the opportunity to discuss this subject. Perhaps I may say to the noble Baroness in passing that I share her feelings about following the noble Earl, Lord Russell, whose erudition and eloquence I have struggled to match since we first took part in debates...

Parliament and the Executive (18 Jul 2001)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I wish to intervene only briefly, because it could be said that others have already said much of what I wish to contribute to this subject. They have also written it, in the shape of the report of the Hansard Society Commission, to which so many friendly references have been made in the course of the debate--or at least, I think that all the references have been friendly. However, I...

Anti-terrorism Review (4 Mar 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, it is particularly important that the Minister moved the Motion, because, as I was going to start by saying, it would be slightly disingenuous of me to welcome the debate in view of the fact that it is virtually essential for the Government to pass the Motion. Under Section 123 of the Act, the result of our report is that the whole Act would disappear into thin air were it not...

Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (Continuance in force of sections 21 to 23) Order 2004 (11 Mar 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I am grateful to my noble friend on the Front Bench for her courtesy to me, although I should emphasise that I see as no part of that that I am now speaking formally on behalf of the Opposition as distinct from speaking in my capacity as chairman of what was a very non-partisan committee of Privy Counsellors. I saw my noble friend nodding vigorously. I am glad to see that that is...

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Bill (15 Mar 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, it will not surprise anybody looking at the list or hearing the speeches that have been made since this debate started that a mere non-lawyer rises with some diffidence to address the House against the background of what has already been said. On the other hand it is quite important, given some of the controversy that has occurred and the reports that we have seen in the press, that...

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Bill (7 Jun 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I rise to speak only briefly, reminding the House, as I did when I spoke in the original debate on the ouster clause, that I am chairman of the Council on Tribunals, which I hope may be seen as a qualifying interest, rather than a disqualifying interest in this context. Looking carefully in the direction of the Minister, I wish to express my support—and I think I can safely say...

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Bill (7 Jun 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I indicated earlier that when the Council on Tribunals looked at some of the proposals, though it concentrated on Ulster in particular, it was concerned by a number of points of detail. This is another of them. I shall not attempt to speak with the eloquence of the noble Lord, Lord Clinton-Davis, with his much wider knowledge of the operations of the legal profession, but it seems...

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Bill (7 Jun 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I am encouraged by the presence of my distinguished predecessor, the noble and learned Lord, Lord Archer of Sandwell, to intervene briefly. I wish to quote from something that the Council on Tribunals, under the noble and learned Lord's chairmanship, said on an earlier proposal of this kind in its 1999 report. Page 11 states: "We were troubled by the removal of the lay element from...

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Bill (7 Jun 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I am tempted to rise because of what the noble Countess, Lady Mar, has said. I share the view that this amendment, in its exact form, should not be on the face of the Bill. On the other hand, I want to express my support for the general thrust of some of the points the noble Lord, Lord McNally, has made, while acknowledging—with a wry smile in the direction of the Minister—that...

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Bill (7 Jun 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I will not define whether it is congratulation or sympathy, but the Minister may be able to guess.

Lords Amendment (14 Jul 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, having indicated that I very much shared the concerns underlying the exchanges that took place last week, I want to record that I think that the Minister's response is extremely positive and welcome. I express my thanks to him for that.

Human Tissue Bill (22 Jul 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I wish to mention that I am chairman of the Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Hospital Trust and simply to observe that, while that clearly gives me an interest, I would be the last to claim that it makes me an expert. I shall be very brief, for two reasons. First, the list is longer than anticipated therefore the House may welcome some brief speeches and obviously wants also to hear...

Address in Reply to Her Majesty's Most Gracious Speech (29 Nov 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I count it a singular pleasure to be the one who follows that maiden speech from the noble Lord, Lord Gould of Brookwood, which I found in equal measure to be both engaging and impressive as a declaration of his personal views. I do not think that our paths have crossed physically very much in the past, but of course there is no one in British politics whose path has not crossed...

Address in Reply to Her Majesty's Most Gracious Speech (29 Nov 2004)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, perhaps I may also add a brief word about the speech of the noble Baroness, Lady Prosser. I discovered that she and I have something in common. Her father was a greengrocer of a kind that has no doubt been swept largely aside by the supermarkets. My father was an old-style ironmonger. His was that kind of shop where a man in a brown coat can find anything in a drawer behind him,...

Prevention of Terrorism Bill (1 Mar 2005)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, as the former chairman of the Newton committee, to which some reference has been made in these proceedings, perhaps I may make a couple of preliminary points. First, although I speak from these Benches I shall, as always on these matters, seek to speak in a totally non-partisan way. Secondly, I need to make this clear, especially as at least one other member of the committee is in...

Prevention of Terrorism Bill (7 Mar 2005)

Lord Newton of Braintree: I want to speak only briefly, in the light of what I said at Second Reading, when I expressed a number of regrets, some of which have been echoed in slightly different ways during this debate. I regretted that there did not appear to have been more active consideration of alternatives to Part 4 in the wake of our report; that for the second time we were—I echoed what the noble Baroness,...

Palliative Care (7 Jul 2005)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, the House will have observed that my noble and learned friend Lord Lyell of Markyate is now here, but he has indicated to me that before addressing the House he wishes to pause and recover from his fortitude in getting here. I welcome him, and congratulate him on that fortitude, and, indeed, the noble Baroness, Lady Finlay of Llandaff, who I suspect also had some difficulty in...

Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Bill [HL] (29 Nov 2006)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, I had been going to start by declaring my rather direct and specific interest as chairman of the Council on Tribunals, but the noble and learned Lord the Lord Chancellor has very kindly already done that for me, and I am grateful to him. I certainly should declare that interest in opening my remarks. Unlike those of the noble and learned Lord the Lord Chancellor, my remarks will...

Consumers, Estate Agents and Redress Bill [HL] (30 Jan 2007)

Lord Newton of Braintree: moved Amendment No. 64A: Clause 46 , leave out Clause 46

Consumers, Estate Agents and Redress Bill [HL] (30 Jan 2007)

Lord Newton of Braintree: My Lords, although the amendment seeks to leave out Clause 46, I should say straightaway that—as I am sure the Minister's officials will have spotted—it is designed not to wreck the entire Bill but to enable me to raise again a point that I raised in Committee. For those who wish to be keen students of my earlier speech, it was reported in Hansard on 9 January at cols. 73 to 75. My point...


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