Results 1–20 of 271 for speaker:Lord Carlisle of Bucklow

HM Prison Rochester (17 Apr 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, can the Minister say whether it is still the view of the Government that prison works?

The Queen Mother: 100th Birthday Celebrations (17 May 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, should the BBC stand by its present intention not to cover this event, will the Minister undertake to remind the BBC that many of us who have, throughout our time in politics, supported the principle that the BBC should be funded by a licence fee on the basis that the BBC is a national body may now have reason to consider changing our support?

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (22 May 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: One of the advantages of Committee stage when one has not taken part in the Second Reading is that one has had an opportunity to read the speeches made on that occasion. All I can say is that, having read the speeches of my noble friend Lord Windlesham, the right reverend Prelate the Bishop of Lincoln, and the noble Baroness, Lady Kennedy of The Shaws, I agree with every word that each has...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (27 Jun 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, in Committee I expressed my total opposition to the clause and do not renege from that. Its effect is to impose the removal of benefit on an allegation of breach, rather than on the finding of the court--which principle is novel and unacceptable. I read with great care the Minister's reply in Committee but remain unconvinced by her arguments. She said that the Government are merely...

Football Hooliganism (4 Jul 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, I accept entirely everything said by my noble friend Lord Windlesham in relation to the seriousness of football hooliganism. However, do I understand the Minister to suggest that this new power will enable a police officer at an airport to remove the passport of an individual who has no previous convictions of any kind, and prevent him travelling merely on a "suspicion" (to use the...

As an Amendment to Commons Amendment No. 136 (18 Jul 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, when the Minister introduced the amendment, she referred to the history of discussions about grammar schools over the past 25 years. As someone who had a part in that history, perhaps I may say that I notice and accept that on the face of it the Labour Party appears substantially to have changed its position. Perhaps I may remind her that in 1979 the purpose of the first Bill...

Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill (31 Oct 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, I support those who have spoken to the amendment. As the noble Lord, Lord Dholakia, said, sentencing and punishment will not achieve their aim unless they are directed at rehabilitating the offender so that he is less likely to re-offend. I realise that the words "the reduction of re-offending" are on the face of the Bill, but I cannot see the argument against including as one of...

Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill (31 Oct 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, I, too, support the amendment. Like the noble Lord, Lord Harris, I have been a Home Office Minister. I cannot understand why the Home Secretary is so keen to have the power to appoint and impose chief probation officers. In Committee the Minister said, and repeated regularly, that the whole purpose of the Bill is to have a national probation service locally delivered, presumably by...

Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill (31 Oct 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, surely the argument against the possibility of such a merger is that the tasks of the Chief Inspector of Prisons and of the Chief Inspector of Probation are, by their very nature, different. I accept that the criminal justice system must be considered as a whole, but the duty of the Chief Inspector of Probation is to deal with those services that provide for the punishment and...

Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill (31 Oct 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, I realise that the hour is getting late. But, like the noble Earl, Lord Russell, there is a fundamental principle behind the amendments proposed by my noble friend Lady Blatch, and I am delighted to see that the Attorney-General has been good enough to attend to reply to this debate. I did not take part in the Committee stage and therefore I want to set out, I hope briefly, what I...

Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill (31 Oct 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, am I right in thinking that the 1991 Act implemented the proposals of the committee, which I had the honour of chairing, for reforming the parole system and provided for the release of those serving sentences of four years or less at the 50 per cent stage?

Criminal Justice and Court Services Bill (31 Oct 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, perhaps I may speak once more before the noble and learned Lord the Attorney-General sits down. Of course I had nothing to do with the framing of the 1991 Act, nor did I take part in the discussions on it; but I accept that I was responsible for the review of parole which led to it. However, there may be a difference in what he is saying and I should like to look again at the Act....

Sexual Offences (Amendment) Bill (13 Nov 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: Is the noble and learned Lord really saying as the logic of his argument that one should equate vaginal intercourse with anal intercourse? Many would not accept that.

Sodomy: Scotland (13 Nov 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: I am sure the noble and learned Lord will agree that having seen and read many reports, and through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board when we have been compensating the victims of those who have been abused in institutions, one is shaken by the effect that it has had on the whole of their lives. As the noble and learned Lord said, they come out badly scarred.

Sodomy: Scotland (13 Nov 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: I apologise to the noble and learned Lord because I entered the Chamber in the middle of his remarks. Over the past 12 months and more, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board has seen many of these cases. They are, as the noble and learned Lord stated, disturbing. I agree with him that the most serious point of all is that the young people are abused in a home where they have been required...

Sodomy: Scotland (13 Nov 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: I rise with the intention of being helpful but I doubt whether I shall succeed. If the argument is that we cannot proceed with further amendments which add a fifth condition because the amendment which would allow that has been defeated, these matters could be aired on the Question whether the clause shall stand part of the Bill and the Government would have an opportunity to consider them...

Sodomy: Scotland (13 Nov 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My understanding--and I thought that the learned Attorney-General agreed with me--is that on the issue of clause stand part you are entitled to discuss not only what is in it but other matters relevant to it. I see the learned Clerk nodding. It seems to me, therefore, that although one cannot at this moment move any of the particular amendments that refer to a fifth condition, it is possible...

Sodomy: Scotland (13 Nov 2000)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: Despite the lateness of the hour, I wonder whether I might take up a little of the Committee's time to discuss Clause 4. My understanding of the position--I should be grateful for the agreement of the Attorney-General when he comes to reply--is that we have voted to retain 18 as the age below which buggery will be a criminal offence, but we have accepted those clauses of the Bill which...

Alterations to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme (27 Mar 2001)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, I start by declaring an interest as someone who, for the past 10 years, was the part-time chairman of the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board until its demise in April last year and who, since that date has, as the Minister said, accepted to sit on the board of the new authority for the purpose of clearing up those cases which the board had not dealt with but which still have to be...

Swinfen Hall Young Offender Institution (30 Apr 2001)

Lord Carlisle of Bucklow: My Lords, does the Minister agree that Sir David's report on Swinfen Hall shows his willingness to be critical when prisons are bad and to praise when they are good? Is it not another example of what an excellent Chief Inspector of Prisons he has been? Has a decision been made about his future?


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.