Results 1201–1220 of 1229 for speaker:Lord Clinton-Davis

Hijacks: Airport Contingency Plans (6 Jun 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, does the Minister agree that it is absolute nonsense for the Government to declare that a particular airfield, aerodrome or airport is to be used for hijacked aircraft? Would not terrorists regard that information as most useful? Should not the Government continue to utilise the airports which are most convenient for planes which are hijacked rather than designate a specific airport?

Transport Bill (5 Jun 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I apologise to the noble Lord who has just spoken. He did not refer to air traffic safety and my remarks are concerned exclusively with that matter. I hope that I make sufficient declaration of my interests if I say that I am President of the British Airline Pilots Association and am a former aviation Minister and member of the European Commission with responsibility for transport...

Transport Bill (5 Jun 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, before the shadow Minister completes his remarks in relation to privatisation, will he indicate whether any of the trade unions concerned support his idea?

Transport Bill (5 Jun 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, before the Minister develops his argument in another direction, perhaps he will deal with this. His officials have met the representatives of the three trade unions concerned. They remain dissatisfied with the provision of safety. They are not compelled by the Government's argument. If the three trade unions concerned are not satisfied, will the Minister take the opportunity to meet...

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I shall not spend much time on this matter, or enter the argument about sarcasm. It is impossible for noble Lords to say that they have no opinion as to whether the United Kingdom should remain in the European Union.

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: The amendment refers to people giving their opinion as to whether the United Kingdom should stay in or leave the European Union. That being so, it is palpably absurd to rule out everyone who has spoken in the debate. I believe that the whole argument is absurd.

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: The noble Earl should read the amendment he has tabled. It provides that two members shall be nominated by the Chancellor of the Exchequer as persons having no opinion as to whether the United Kingdom should stay in or leave the EU. I know of no such eunuchs. Perhaps they exist somewhere but they do not exist in this Chamber as regards this debate.

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I shall not give way again because the quality of the interventions do not add to the debate. The fact of the matter is that no one who has spoken in the debate so far has revealed an intention to have no views on the matter. It is quite absurd. The Chancellor of the Exchequer cannot agree the amendment because then no one would believe the Chancellor of the Exchequer for one moment in the...

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: But qualified majority voting did not come into operation until 1987--I cannot remember when in 1987--but the ideas put forward by the Commission operated before 1987. Afterwards the Government had every opportunity--which they chose to ignore--to put forward proposals which would be subject to qualified majority voting. They chose not to do so.

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: Will the noble Lord give way? How can he suggest that no one has any views about withdrawal or entry into the Common Market? How does he suggest that noble Lords should be adjudged about that? Let us say that subsequently they form a view in favour of or against the issues of the Common Market and they shift their opinion. Does he then disqualify them or entertain them?

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I have not made a speech in this place since I had a stroke on 3rd December, and I reserve anything I have to say to matters which are serious. This is no exception. This is a silly Bill. First, this Bill has no application at all. We heard from the noble Lord, Lord Pearson, and from my noble friend Lord Bruce, who said that he has been interested in this issue since 1963. Well, my noble...

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: No, she does not. She merely wishes to introduce the beverage of water to her diet. No one, for one moment, wishes to prevent her from doing so. The European Union has many features--

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I thought that I had spoken to the amendment. I had to introduce my remarks in that way because I think that the amendment is flippant. As far as concerns the amendment, we are entitled to know, "the impact costs and other public expenditure", of not going into the European Union, but we have not heard a word about that from my noble friend this afternoon. We are entitled to know what that...

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I was responsible for the costs of water. No one could have prevented the House of Lords or the House of Commons from making a protest about the costs of water. However, they chose not to do so. The reason the government of the day advanced against the proposals made with regard to water had nothing whatsoever to do with costs. That being the case, why is the noble Baroness so much opposed to...

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: There was no official whip in the House of Commons, so at that time I voted against the entry into the Common Market because that was my view. I was wrong. The House of Commons considered the matter in the light of numerous amendments to the Bill and in the light of the consideration that was given to it at the time, at Second Reading, in Committee and in all the other stages. So, with great...

European Union (Implications of Withdrawal) Bill [H.L.] (12 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: Perhaps I may--

Rover (9 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, does the Minister agree, first, that the noble Lord, Lord Mackay of Ardbrecknish, is far more amenable to reason than his counterpart in the other place who expressed indifference to the idea that Rover should be saved in this way, albeit temporarily? Secondly, does my noble friend agree that Rover-Phoenix requires considerable support from either a British or foreign car...

Zimbabwe (3 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, is it not extremely important to obtain the support of all people--that is to say, those in the Commonwealth and in the United States, as well as those in the EU? From the point of view of President Mugabe, is it not also extremely important for him to understand that the world is horrified by what has happened in Zimbabwe? Further, is it not equally wrong for my noble friend to...

Demonstrations in Central London (2 May 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I have tremendous regard for my noble friend Lord Mishcon because he was my tutor. But is not the Minister concerned at his suggestion that there should be a separate entitlement to trial for those people? Should not the persons concerned be treated as equal before the law? That being so, is it not better for existing magistrates to determine whether or not they should be tried?...

Federal Europe: Party Policies (12 Apr 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether they have received any representations from the newly-formed Conservatives Against a Federal Europe (CAFE) and, if so, what has been their response.


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