Results 1141–1160 of 1229 for speaker:Lord Clinton-Davis

Barristers' Fees (8 Nov 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether any drain of talent from family and criminal work at the Bar is likely following the Lord Chancellor's proposals for criminal and family legal aid.

Barristers' Fees (8 Nov 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I thank the noble and learned Lord the Lord Chancellor for that reply. Is he aware that solicitors have shown a commendable concern, equal to that of barristers, for the efficacy of the Legal Aid Fund? In view of the fact that the noble and learned Lord is to meet them either separately or together--preferably together--will he ensure that he represents fully in the discussions...

Flooding and Flood Defence (6 Nov 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, first, will the Minister indicate whether the ABI has fallen down on its duties towards insured people? When did the noble Baroness or her fellow Ministers discuss the matter with the ABI? What has been its response? Secondly, what happens to tenants or sub-tenants who are not insured? They would not be covered by the ABI. Have the Government any plans in respect of those people?

Transport Bill (2 Nov 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I compliment my noble friend for having listened to the representations that have been made. In no way do I cast any aspersions upon the noble Lord who has been a friend of mine for many years. However, my noble friend has learned a superb lesson in regard to listening to the concerns of this House. We have had the experience not only of the theories, but of the day-to-day practical...

Transport Bill (30 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, is the Minister aware that local authorities may undertake a review in any event in light of any unfair provision and that other parties may give a clear indication if a scheme is not working out? The amendment adds nothing to existing practice among individual local authorities.

Transport Bill (30 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, the Opposition are entirely wrong. If the driver is self-employed it follows that he will be liable. If the driver is employed by someone else it follows that that person will be responsible for the fine. It may be that that person will, if he is not lacking in responsibility, take the appropriate moves against the employee. The Government are entirely right about that and the...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I entirely accept the arguments put forward by the noble Lord, Lord Hoyle. If my noble friend adduces the argument that this proposal has been put forward without adequate consideration--although I am not sure that he will-- I assert that that would be entirely wrong. The lawyers who have advised those who have tabled the amendment have said specifically that the proposal is...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, will my noble friend give way? There are ample examples of employee representatives, or people advanced by their trade union, who are already directors. Is he saying that they are always beset by problems of conflict of interest?

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I support the amendment on behalf of myself as president of BALPA. I do not speak on behalf of BALPA but on behalf of myself. As my noble friend Lord Brett said, there is an advantage in ensuring a proper reflection of the point of view of employees. The amendment does not state that the employee must be a representative of a particular union; it involves the idea that the employees...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, before the noble Lord sits down I want to ask him a question. He has argued only that the Government should do nothing precipitate at this stage. Has he considered the alternative to what the Government are suggesting because he has not mentioned one word about it? He has argued only that there should be a delay. What are the Conservative Party arguing for? It is not for delay but...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I follow my noble friend Lord Shore because I have been invited to repeat what I said in my intervention. It was, frankly, that I do not trust the Tories and I never have. And I do not trust them on this issue in particular. The Tories entertain a belief that they will win the next election. They had better disabuse their minds of that, particularly in the light of today's opinion...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I am obliged to the noble Lord for giving way. Is he saying that British or any other airlines have opposed the Canadian experiment? The logic of that would be that together they would have announced some kind of demarche against the Canadian experiment, but, so far as I know, they have not done so.

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, perhaps I should have made this point myself. Perhaps my noble friend will explain why a former Labour government of approximately five years and three months did not take any action in this regard. Is it not a fact that that Labour government considered that NATS performed well? Is there any evidence that NATS has failed to perform up to standard in the 20 years since that Labour...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, I speak on behalf of the British Airline Pilots Association, of which I am the president. I have made full disclosure to the House. Any statement that I make in relation to other amendments are dependent on that. At the very outset my noble friend Lord Brett said that he had visited Canada and seen for himself the operation of the scheme. He is right or wrong. It is incumbent on the...

Transport Bill (26 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, as one of those who raised the issue in this place, I, too, am obliged to the Minister for referring to me and to the noble Lord, Lord Hoyle. However, as the Minister knows, I wish that the Government had come to another conclusion. But having regard to what are the parameters of the Government's thoughts on the matter, I accept that the noble Lord has done all that he can in...

The Hatfield Derailment (19 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, does my noble friend agree that at the moment there are too many instances of bad quality track and that something urgently needs to be done so that the confidence of the travelling public can be addressed properly? Is he also aware that large capital gains have been made by those in charge of the railway system, which does not sit well with what has happened tragically in the past...

Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Bill (18 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I support the noble Lord, Lord Hayhoe, in one respect. I believe that the Minister should give more careful thought to this matter. I do not know whether this is the right kind of amendment, but I have come to this debate with an open mind and have listened carefully to my noble friend Lord Shore. He was my first Secretary of State, but that is no reason for supporting him today. As one who...

Hatfield Rail Accident (18 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: My Lords, as one who had responsibility in this area in opposition, perhaps I may say that I agree 100 per cent with the statement made by my noble and learned friend Lord Williams of Mostyn. I think it much better that we pause and consider what has happened at the earliest opportunity--tomorrow. I am sad that the noble Lord the Leader of the Opposition has taken the view that he has. I hope...

Freedom of Information Bill (17 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I support in principle the points set out in Amendment No. 24. It is too easy for a public authority to say that the documents have been destroyed. I do not know whether that can be dealt with by way of instruction to public authorities rather than by way of the suggested new clause. I may be wrong, but it seems to me that an indication by my noble and learned friend Lord Falconer about the...

Freedom of Information Bill (17 Oct 2000)

Lord Clinton-Davis: I do not know why some noble Lords insist on the amendments in the light of what they have said. It is important that we test whether the Bill is ambiguous or less open than we would like. The only way to do that is by looking at the information set out in the Bill, not by looking at the general information that noble Lords have mentioned. The noble Lord, Lord Hunt, did not welcome that. I...


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