Results 21–40 of 253 for speaker:Lord Cameron of Dillington

Planning Bill (8 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I am grateful for all the contributions to the debate, both in support and otherwise. I am also grateful to the noble Baroness, Lady Carnegy, for making an interesting intervention. The point of the amendment was to probe to what extent the Government wish to have an open process that is seen to be at arm's length from the Executive. I felt that the Minister acknowledged that, although there...

Planning Bill (14 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I rise to speak to the stand-part debate on Clause 12. I start by repeating my mantra that these national policy statements are hugely important. They are a big step forward and are different from anything that has gone before. If they properly pass all the tests of democracy, they will be the key to making the IPC an effective and respected body. They will make the Bill work. National policy...

Planning Bill (14 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: My Amendment No. 72 would merely place in the Bill the requirement for a local consultee, which in my view it would be inconceivable to leave out of any genuine consultation process. I suspect that the omission of parish councils stems from the usual city-based, departmental process, where the parish councils often do not mean a lot to the people involved—an absence of rural proofing, one...

Planning Bill (14 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: Clause 9 is at the heart of the Bill—or at least those parts of it that seek to speed up infrastructure projects. The national policy statements really make it work and allow the IPC to proceed to do its business with due democratic authority. It is right that national policy statements should be decided at national parliamentary level, which, as I said earlier, is a new development for our...

Planning Bill (14 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: Amendments Nos. 98, 99 and 105 concern the 12-week notice for judicial review. On the one side this Bill is about speeding up the processes, while on the other side it is about the normal civil procedure for filing for judicial review, which provides a maximum time limit of 12 weeks—although the Civil Procedure Rules state that that can be shortened by specific enactments, which is what we...

Planning Bill (16 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I wish to speak to various amendments in this group. I, too, support the noble Lord, Lord Judd, in his appeal to include national park authorities as local authorities. In a way, they themselves are national infrastructure projects of huge importance. It is correct that, as great contributors to the quality of life in this nation, they should be consulted on projects. My Amendments Nos. 189...

Planning Bill (16 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I put my name to Amendment No. 211. I shall not back it up with such complicated urban examples as the noble Earl has given us about leaseholders and so on down the line. I was merely thinking about someone on holiday or about to go on a Christmas break, or a simple farmer or landowner who might be harvesting or lambing. I know several farmers who do not answer their mail during the lambing...

Planning Bill (16 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: Before the amendment is withdrawn, will the Minister reply, or undertake to reply, to my request about the costs of applications generally? Will he write to me on that?

Planning Bill (16 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I shall speak to two amendments in this group. On Amendment No. 216, I am probably fighting a managed retreat, but I think that I have a good defensive position. The Minister has already ably stated why she rejected my earlier amendment that attempted to direct the applicant during the consultation process. I am happy to accept those arguments, but she did say—probably pre-empting my...

Planning Bill (16 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I know that the process is long, but he will not know the details of the application until he gets the notice. I hope that a proposal will be changed throughout the process as a result of the consultation, but the person will not know the details and will be holding fire. He will not be in a position to submit his case.

Planning Bill (20 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I suppose both proposals, but probably more so the Question whether the clause should stand part. I have a problem with the clause from both ends, as it were. Who are the RPBs—or, rather, who will they be? In the debate in the other place, the Minister repeatedly referred to regional assemblies, seemingly without realising that the Government had already decided to abolish them. So my first...

Planning Bill (20 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: The Minister mentioned regional assemblies five or six times. As I understand it, they will cease to exist next year. If they have delegated their powers, who will then get them back?

Planning Bill (20 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I rise to speak to my Amendment No. 417A, mentioned by the noble Baroness, Lady Hamwee. I thank the Minister for tabling her two clarifying amendments to Clause 183. As I represent rural interests, I hope that she will not mind if I probe a bit more. These generally permitted development order rights are important to small farmers, particularly in the western half of the country where I come...

Planning Bill (20 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I am probably very naïve about parliamentary speak, but so that I am totally clear, did the Minister say, in connection with my amendment, that, subject to public consultation, it is not currently the Government's intention that these permitted development rights should be withdrawn?

Planning Bill (20 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I, too, oppose the Question that Clause 190 stand part of the Bill and point out that I have not seen the letter. I gather that this proposal was first aired through government consultation on the planning White Paper in 2007 when 81 per cent of businesses and 60 per cent of professionals and academics viewed the proposal negatively. However, the Government seem to be pursuing it in this...

Planning Bill (23 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: I have only one series of major amendments today that deal with CIL, but I indicated at Second Reading that I have a series of questions which I will attach to other noble Lords' amendments throughout the day. My question has already been asked by other noble Lords, but perhaps I may put it in a rather different way and attach it to Amendment No. 435G in the name of the noble Earl, Lord...

Planning Bill (23 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: There are some quite serious issues in this group of amendments. I refer to government Amendment No. 438C, which refers to what the charging authority must have regard to, and to government Amendment No. 438J, which allows it to charge a nil rate. I refer also to Amendment No. 438H, tabled by the noble Earl, Lord Caithness, considering the economic impacts of the levy. Earlier, the noble...

Planning Bill (23 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: moved Amendment No. 436BC: Clause 200, page 123, line 32, at beginning insert "Except as provided in section (Charities relief),"

Planning Bill (23 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: There are three amendments in this group, in the name of myself and others, that provide for a comprehensive exemption in the Bill for registered charities. I speak on behalf of the Charity Tax Group, the Churches' Legislation Advisory Service and the Charities' Property Association, of the latter of which I am currently chairman. I also speak in response to numerous letters that I have...

Planning Bill (23 Oct 2008)

Lord Cameron of Dillington: Bad neighbour projects.


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