Results 1–20 of 93 for speaker:Lord Alexander of Weedon

Written Answers — House of Lords: Katharine Gun (10 Mar 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: asked Her Majesty's Government: For what reasons they considered that the defence of "necessity" in the Katharine Gun case was sufficiently strong to lead them to abandon the prosecution.

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (8 Mar 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am very glad to follow the noble Lord, Lord Clinton-Davis, whose contributions to our work I always greatly admire. He seems to me to exemplify what the playwright, Robert Bolt, once said, that it is very important to be passionate in defence of moderation. I strongly support the concept of an independent judicial appointments commission, as does Justice, the all-party law reform...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (8 Mar 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, the noble Lord anticipates my next point and perhaps gives me the opportunity of an extra minute. I was just coming to the view that I supported a Select Committee. I want to make it plain that I do not support a Select Committee with any view to killing this Bill. I believe that it is possible—I will be corrected if I am wrong—for the House to give instruction to a Select...

Constitutional Reform Bill [HL] (8 Mar 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I speak as someone who does not want to become a party to any confrontation but who is trying to achieve decent legislation in decent form, and I address the noble Lord, who, as a government Chief Whip, was a very fine supporter of this House. Can he give his view on whether the Bill should have been subject to pre-legislative scrutiny before it was introduced?

Supreme Court and Judicial Reforms (12 Feb 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am grateful to the noble and learned Lord. He said a moment ago that he thought he would never get near having a proper building and a proper resource budget until legislation had established the court. Is the implication that he has absolutely no promise from the Treasury at the moment that he will get the necessary budget?

Supreme Court and Judicial Reforms (12 Feb 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, it is my pleasure and honour, on behalf of the whole House, to congratulate the noble and learned Lord, Lord Cullen of Whitekirk, on his very remarkable maiden speech. He has a very fine record as a lawyer and a judge and perhaps an unrivalled record in the conduct of public inquiries. Over the years, he has conducted an inquiry into the Piper Alpha disaster, the Dunblane shooting...

Hutton Inquiry (4 Feb 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am grateful to the noble and learned Lord for giving way. In view of all the doubts that have been expressed about the legality of the war, would it not be much better if we did not have to rely on a summary view given by the Attorney-General, but that the window was opened to his full advice so that those of us—and there are many—who think that the war was unlawful in...

Hutton Inquiry (4 Feb 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, like the noble and gallant Lord, Lord Bramall, one of my predecessors as president of the MCC, I am not in favour of challenging the decision of the umpire, whether with or without the aid of an action replay. The task of a judge at a public inquiry is lonely and difficult. The noble and learned Lord, Lord Hutton, conducted his hearings splendidly and sensitively. In considering his...

Hutton Inquiry (4 Feb 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am grateful to my noble friend. I find that extremely encouraging. There is so much lack of confidence among international lawyers on the legality of the war that it is crucial that that full advice should be seen. The clamour for a full inquiry was growing before President Bush gave Mr Blair no option but to follow his lead once again. The substantial plus of this war has been...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Law Officers' Advice: Disclosure (12 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether they agree with the view of Lord Palmerston expressed in 1865 that there are many occasions when it is proper and for the convenience of the House that the opinions of the Attorney-General should be made known.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Law Officers' Advice: Disclosure (12 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: asked Her Majesty's Government: On which occasions since 1865 the advice of the Attorney-General has been publicly disclosed.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Law Officers' Advice: Disclosure (12 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: asked Her Majesty's Government: What was the reason for publishing the summary of the views of the Attorney-General on the legality of the war against Iraq; and why they have since consistently declined requests for information as to whether the Attorney-General gave any fuller advice on the legality of the war.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Law Officers' Advice: Disclosure (12 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether, in the light of the views expressed by international lawyers and Kofi Annan that the invasion of Iraq was contrary to international law, they will now publish the full advice of the Attorney-General so that his reasons may be open to public scrutiny.

Single Transferable Vote (5 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am grateful to the noble Lord for giving way. Since he trails his coat about the excellence of the Government's record on proportional representation, does he agree that the 1997 manifesto promised a referendum on the outcome of what became the Jenkins commission? If so, can he say why such a referendum has never been held?

Single Transferable Vote (5 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am grateful to the noble Earl, Lord Russell, for introducing this debate, not least because it gives me an opportunity to pay tribute to the unfailing contribution that he makes to the work of this House. He combines an unrivalled knowledge of history with an acute sensitivity to contemporary events that enrich our work. It is typical of that sense of purpose that he has raised...

Single Transferable Vote (5 Jan 2004)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I am very conscious of that because the noble Earl and I are very much on the same side in this debate. We have slightly different views on the preferable means of improving the system but whether or not it brands me as an inadequate Conservative, I am fully supportive of changes to the electoral system. However, even our modest proposal found no favour with the Government. Did we...

Science and Technology (3 Dec 2003)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I take the debate back to Iraq. After 11th September 2001, the United States had the most widespread sympathy and support in the struggle against terrorism. However, what has now become pellucidly clear is that it instantly made up its mind—I believe, unwisely—to pursue Iraq. Any doubts on that have recently been dissolved in a splendid book by General Wesley Clark, the Supreme...

Criminal Justice Bill (4 Nov 2003)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I add a word of support for the amendment. This is one of the most important points in the Bill. My noble friend Lord Kingsland suggested that many of the Government's proposals turn on their head the normal principles of criminal law. The principle that I was brought up on was governed by the particular thread that evidence should be admitted only if it was more probative than...

Criminal Justice Bill (4 Nov 2003)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I began by being attracted to the amendment tabled by the noble Lord, Lord Clinton-Davis, and to the way in which the argument was put by my noble friend Lord Carlisle of Bucklow. I still feel that I would have expected, at first sight, to find such a provision in Clause 63. As the noble and learned Lord, Lord Ackner, pointed out, there is a not dissimilar provision in Clause 64(2)....

Criminal Justice Bill (4 Nov 2003)

Lord Alexander of Weedon: My Lords, I have doubts about the breadth of the list put forward by the Government. I see very much the force of the argument that we should follow the Law Commission's representations and the principled argument developed by the right reverend Prelate, whereas we look at a list of offences which have here been categorised as serious—and they are serious—but on relatively judgmental...


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