Results 101–120 of 3194 for speaker:Lord Kingsland

Prisoners: Early Release — Question (20 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, when my noble and learned friend Lord Mayhew posed his question to the Minister, the Minister responded by saying that the temporary scheme would be finished "when headroom allows". Will the Minister inform the House, as accurately as he can, what he means by the expression "when headroom allows"?

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I am most grateful to all noble Lords who have participated in this debate and to the Minister for his full reply. For clarification, is he saying that although he is not inclined to include my Amendment 28 in Clause 2, nevertheless we can read it as if the amendment were included?

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: It is a point of substance.

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: Has the Minister received the best evidence available from his advisers?

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I would have expected nothing less from him. It follows from what he says that I shall return to this matter on Report, because, with great respect to him, he has not met my fundamental argument, which is that in each case where the MMO exercises its judgment, its starting point must be the best available scientific evidence. I accept that there may be different views about what is the best...

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: That is a different argument from the one that the Minister deployed previously. I understood him to say that the expression "the best available scientific evidence" is insufficiently precise.

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: That is precisely its intention. Its whole intention is to say that this consideration is above all other considerations; because the fundamental question is what impact certain human activities will have on the biodiversity of a particular slice of the ocean. The starting point for the MMO must be to decide what the scientific situation and the state of biodiversity are. How endangered are...

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I apologise to the Minister for intervening at this stage and breaking up the flow of his eloquence, but he has kindly given way. The reason why I believe it crucial to have this expression in the duties in Clause 2 is that the scientific obligations on the MMO are of a different order of magnitude from the obligations that it has in relation to all the human activities that may or may not...

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: This group of amendments takes us back to our earlier debate about the relationship of science to the organisation. I should start by declaring an interest: for the past seven years, I have been chairman of the board of trustees of the Plymouth Marine Laboratory. Until 2002, it was a Government-owned institution. I hasten to add that I am not a marine scientist, so I do not need to debate...

Committee (1st Day)(Continued) (12 Jan 2009)

Lord Kingsland: It would be wrong for me to anticipate my amendments, which will follow shortly. Perhaps I may just draw the attention of the noble Lord, Lord Oxburgh, to them, and hope that he will speak to them with equal warmth when the time comes.

Queen's Speech — Debate (4th Day) (9 Dec 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, as the noble Lord, Lord Williamson of Horton, observed, the subject matter on the gracious Speech today is extremely wide. Indeed, I suggest that his insight is a powerful candidate for being the understatement of the day. I apologise to noble Lords in advance for not responding to their speeches where they covered matters that were spoken to by my noble friend Lady Neville-Jones in...

Queen's Speech — Debate (4th Day) (9 Dec 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, in those areas that I have mentioned to your Lordships' House I can certainly guarantee that. The other absent matter, which those of us who featured in the consideration of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill earlier in the year will intimately and vividly recall, is the follow-through of the constructive work on the rehabilitation of offenders. Powerful speeches have been...

Queen's Speech — Debate (4th Day) (9 Dec 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, it is a matter for the judiciary to decide what particular sentences anyone gets. I would be totally opposed to the permanent continuation of any kind of prison regime that meant that certain prisoners could stay in prison indefinitely because, for one reason or another, they had been sent to prison at a time when a judge thought that they were a danger to society. However, it is a...

Queen's Speech — Debate (4th Day) (9 Dec 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, this is a matter that we might take up beyond the confines of the Chamber. My view is that, whatever you are inside for, you are basically entitled to the same opportunities; so that when you get out you do not reoffend. That is the fundamental principle to which we should stick. I am delighted to say that there is no Bill to accumulate data in a central database. In a speech to the...

Constitution: Executive, Judiciary and Parliament (Constitution Committee Report) (18 Nov 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, first, I should like to thank my noble friend Lord Goodlad for his excellent report and his opening speech. Equally, I congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Pannick, on his memorable maiden speech and echo everything that has been said about it by other noble Lords. The noble Lord, Lord Pannick, is a practising barrister of colossal distinction and a journalist of wit and perspicacity....

Counter-Terrorism Bill (11 Nov 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, I thank the Minister once again for his very careful and thorough reply. I do not really understand his point as to its timing being unhelpful. The principle of a fair hearing has been established in R v MB. What a fair hearing is in the circumstances of any particular case is a matter for other courts to decide. The amendment does not seek to stipulate, in any particular...

Counter-Terrorism Bill (11 Nov 2008)

Lord Kingsland: moved Amendment No. 48D: After Clause 80, insert the following new Clause— "Control orders: right to fair hearing (1) The Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 (c. 2) is amended as follows. (2) At the end of section 3(13) (supervision by court of making of non-derogating control orders) insert "except where to do so would be incompatible with the right of the controlled person to a fair...

Counter-Terrorism Bill (11 Nov 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, I now turn to the question of whether the terms of Section 3 of the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005, its Schedule and the rules of court made under them are sufficient to provide a potential controllee with a fair hearing before an order is made, as required by Article 6(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights. The Appellate Committee of your Lordships' House decided, in the...

Counter-Terrorism Bill (11 Nov 2008)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, I am most grateful to the Minister for giving such detailed consideration to the two amendments that we tabled. I am somewhat puzzled that he thinks that our drafts are in some way inconsistent with the judgment of the case of R v E. I have just glanced at paragraph 69 of the 10th report of the Joint Committee on Human Rights for the Session 2007-08. It states: "The Secretary of...

Counter-Terrorism Bill (11 Nov 2008)

Lord Kingsland: moved Amendment No. 48B: After Clause 80, insert the following new Clause— "Control orders: pre-conditions (1) Section 2 to the Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 (c. 2) (making of non-derogating control orders) is amended as follows. (2) After subsection (1)(b) at the end insert "; and (c) unless section 3(1)(b) below applies, the DPP has certified that there is no reasonable prospect of...


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