Results 121–140 of 3194 for speaker:Lord Kingsland

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: moved Amendment No. 4: Clause 1, page 2, line 28, leave out "or (b)"

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: The amendment raises intensive fostering, which is not to be confused with the normal fostering obligations that lie on a local authority for general welfare purposes. The evidence we have so far suggests that intensive fostering has great potential to keep a child out of custody, but does that only when it is properly implemented. The Government have pilot projects in, I think, three...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: I am grateful to the Minister, and rather intrigued by his last remark that the scheme will not fail through lack of resources. Is there a glimmer of hope that, where a local authority consistently refuses to provide resources for intensive fostering in its area, it might either be leant on or assisted by the criminal justice regime? Is it fair to say that the Government are considering this...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: Taking a child away from its family is a very serious matter. Everybody here is aware that this is—perhaps "draconian" is the wrong word, but it is a far-reaching arrow in the quiver of possibilities. Nevertheless, in certain circumstances, it can have extremely beneficial effects. Therefore, we applaud the Government's pilot projects and hope that, if the initial findings are verified with...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: As the noble Baroness, Lady Stern, said, custody is expensive and damaging, and in any case, it is largely ineffective. The JCHR wants statutory protection for government policy that custody should be the last resort. We have two amendments that seek to achieve that objective. I have a question for the noble Baroness, Lady Linklater of Butterstone. What if an offender commits a first offence...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: It may well. I simply put the question; I did not know what was the answer. The noble Earl appears to have given me, as he so often does, a completely armour-plated, ocean-going explanation.

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: So we can be reassured that the amendments are not contaminated by the matter that I raised. I emphasise again that, in my view, the key to all this is trust: trust the individual who is trying the case; trust him to get it right. Do not require him to end up awarding a custodial sentence in inappropriate circumstances.

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: Since 2 October 2006, defendants appearing before magistrates' courts and youth courts have been required to pass the financial eligibility test to qualify for publicly funded representation. However, since 1 November 2007, all defendants under the age of 18 are passported through the means test. In the debate in another place held on the sixth day in Committee, the Minister, Mr Hanson,...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: The British Crime Survey states that alcohol is a factor in no less than 47 per cent of violent crime. That breaks down to 45 per cent of incidents of domestic violence, 58 per cent of incidents of stranger violence and 51 per cent of incidents of acquaintance violence. It is central to violent offending. All that the amendments of the noble Lord, Lord Avebury, are seeking to do is to put the...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: The Government will not be surprised to hear that I share the concerns of my noble friend Lord Onslow. If nearly 50 per cent of all violent crime is fuelled by alcohol, then at best the Government's reaction to this amendment is complacent; at worst it is inexplicable.

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: moved Amendment No. 29: Schedule 2, page 168, line 21, leave out paragraphs 3 and 4

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: National standards for breach proceedings require the responsible officers to issue warnings for unreasonable instances of non-compliance and to initiate breach proceedings where there are three unreasonable failures within a 12-month period. Currently, there is discretion to depart from this in exceptional cases and with the authorisation of the youth offending team manager. The Bill removes...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (5 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: I thank all noble Lords who have participated in the debate. The Minister said that the new provision reflected national standards, but I thought that the current situation was a reflection of national standards. I am very much in debt to the noble Baroness, Lady Falkner, for two reasons. First, she felicitously explained that the community order system does not work at present for reasons...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: moved Amendment No. 32: Schedule 2, page 170, line 17, leave out from "ways" to end of line 18

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: I shall speak also to Amendment No. 39. Under current provisions, courts can choose to leave a youth rehabilitation order unamended after a breach. For instance, a young person on a standard six-month supervision order might have kept more than 90 per cent of his or her appointments but still qualify for breach action. Breach proceedings may often be brought where the young person's...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: I am most grateful to the Minister for his reply, and to all noble Lords who spoke in this short and very revealing debate. These amendments have not only occurred to the Opposition. Rather, their underlying views are extremely powerfully advocated by the Standing Committee for Youth Justice. I am a little unclear, given the Minister's response, about exactly what motivation lies behind the...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: I asked the noble Lord whether the situation had changed as a result of your clause, in the context of the other clauses to which he had rightly drawn the attention of the Committee. The noble Lord said that the situation had changed. If so, my amendment retains its force. I can modestly say that it has received considerable support in the Committee. We have probably reached the stage where—

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: That is a bold thing for the Minister to say. In all the circumstances, I beg leave to withdraw the amendment. The Minister will not be surprised to hear that this is one of our amendments that will be coming back on Report.

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: It will not surprise the Committee to hear that we are also extremely sympathetic to the amendments tabled by my noble friend, by the noble Lord, Lord Judd, and by the noble Baroness, Lady Stern. The noble Lord, Lord Judd, made some particularly telling observations about allegations of softness from both the Government and the press. The noble Baroness, Lady Stern, developed the notion of...

Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill (6 Feb 2008)

Lord Kingsland: I am most grateful to the noble Lord for giving way. That would place the noble Lord, would it not, precisely in the position outlined by the noble Lord, Lord Judd, in his previous intervention?


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.