Results 81–100 of 3194 for speaker:Lord Kingsland

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (23 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: Amendments 92 and 95, like the other amendments in this group, concern the action that ought to be taken to prevent other deaths. At present, the Bill leaves it at the discretion of the coroner to decide whether to inform a person in a position of power of any action which he feels might eliminate, or at least reduce, the chances of other deaths, other deaths which might occur in a similar...

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (23 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: Perhaps I may return to paragraph 6(1) of Schedule 4, a matter to which the noble and learned Baroness, Lady Butler-Sloss, also addressed herself. I simply want to understand exactly what the Minister is saying. Here we have a situation where a senior coroner has been conducting an investigation. That investigation gives rise to a concern that there are circumstances that create a risk of...

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (23 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I am extremely grateful to the Minister for that response.

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (23 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I rise simply to say that we support the amendments.

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (4th Day) (Continued) (30 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I share the views expressed by the noble and learned Lord about the legislative exercise in which the Government are currently engaged. We are, in effect, being asked to consider the partial defences in a vacuum. Until we know what they will be measured against—what the Government will say about the component parts of the crime of murder—we are not in a position to reach any conclusions...

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (4th Day) (Continued) (30 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I know that your Lordships will agree when I say that the Committee owes a great debt to the noble and learned Lord, Lord Lloyd, not only for the terms of his amendment but for the quality of the debate in your Lordships' House that it has engendered. In promoting his amendment, the noble and learned Lord exhibited the intellect of a former Lord of Appeal in Ordinary, together with the...

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (4th Day) (Continued) (30 Jun 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My remarks will, I trust, harmonise with those already expressed during the debate on this line of amendments although, such was the depth and the sophistication of the speech by the noble Baroness, Lady Murphy, and indeed that by the noble Lord, Lord Alderdice, I cannot be absolutely sure. Moreover, in comparison to those speeches, what I am about to say will seem exceedingly naive. Our...

Coroners and Justice Bill: Committee (5th Day) (7 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: The encyclopaedic exegesis of the law of provocation by the noble Lord, Lord Thomas, has lifted a heavy burden from my shoulders and enabled me to be uncharacteristically brief. Despite the fact that we have a large number of amendments to this clause, our amendments on loss of control as a partial defence to murder are designed to make the defence easier to apply. These amendments are a...

Coroners and Justice Bill: Committee (5th Day) (7 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My noble friend raises an important question that has been testing the courts, as my noble friend well knows, since the passing of Section 3 of the Homicide Act 1957. Indeed, that is one of the reasons why the Government have introduced the clauses in this Bill. In my view, the test must always be measured against the reasonable man, despite the fact that it seems nonsense to my noble friend....

Coroners and Justice Bill: Committee (5th Day) (7 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I wholly endorse what the noble Lord, Lord Thomas of Gresford, has said, and I await the response of the noble and learned Baroness, Lady Scotland.

Coroners and Justice Bill — Committee (5th Day) (Continued) (7 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: I, too, thank and congratulate the Government for the statement made this afternoon, and the signatories of the amendment for provoking it. The date of 1 January 1991 is eminently sensible and defensible, for all the reasons that the noble Lord, Lord Hannay, gave to your Lordships. I suspect that, when the Minister sits down, the outstanding issue will be the grey area between "residence"...

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, I am most grateful to the noble Lord for giving way. I can assure him that the Opposition have not been nobbled in the way that he suggests.

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, once again, the noble Lord is very kind in giving way. The fundamental difficulty about the Bill is that it tries to do two separate things, one of which is wholly laudable and that is to deal with the immediate problem of expenses and how they are dealt with. The other is the quite separate question of financial interests; an extremely complicated matter involving the privileges of...

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, my noble and learned friend Lord Mayhew of Twysden, with his characteristic felicity of expression, referred to the deft footwork of the noble Baroness in her opening speech. How right he was. Indeed, it reminded me of a phrase in that memorable wartime song, "A nightingale sang in Berkeley Square": "the nimble tread of the feet of Fred Astaire". My noble friend Lord MacGregor set a...

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, the noble Earl can ask as much as he likes. I have found, when I have responded to similar questions from him in previous debates, that I have rarely satisfied him. However, I will put the questions to the noble Baroness at a later stage in my remarks. I hope that that will suffice. I will say something about constitutional issues. The best way to do this is to draw your Lordships'...

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, we have tabled an amendment to the effect that the word "recommend" should be replaced by the word "report". The Government have indicated that they are considering it. I had not understood that they had accepted it.

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, if that is an undertaking—

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, we are in danger of getting into a Committee debate here, so I will reply to the noble Lord as succinctly as I can. My understanding is that the investigation process is plainly judicially reviewable, and if it falls below the standards of the Human Rights convention, a court will say so and the procedures will have to change.

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, I completely agree with the noble Lord. The issue is whether Section 6 is human rights compliant. I was addressing a different issue: what happens if IPSA makes a recommendation to the Committee on Standards and Privileges with respect to the possibility of the court judicially reviewing the committee? Now that the noble Baroness has underlined that she has made that concession, I...

Parliamentary Standards Bill: Second Reading (8 Jul 2009)

Lord Kingsland: My Lords, it is now possible to do that, and indeed I believe that to be the more desirable approach.


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